Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture Enduring Connections: Exploring Delmarva's Black History

Audio & Video

These audiovisual sources come from a variety of collections at the Nabb Research Center and primarily consist of oral history interviews, although there are some performances and events with audio. Videos are embedded from YouTube, where the Nabb Research Center's historic film and video can be found; Audio files are embedded from Internet Archive, where the Nabb Research Center's audio, historic newspapers, transcriptions, and manuscripts can be found.


1:03:06

Reeling in the Past: San Domingo, MD

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 10, 2009

African American residents of San Domingo, MD, Describe their upbringing and lives in that area of the Eastern Shore of MD. March 10, 2009.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition "Reeling in the Past" collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:07:10

African- American Tradition in Voice: Slave Spirituals & Gospel Music

August 9, 2023
Recorded October 29, 2010

An evening concert of African-American gospel music presented by the Society for the Preservation of African-American Arts Singers. October 29, 2010.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and History Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:01:34

"Putting Delmarva First": Georgetown

August 9, 2023
Recorded February 19, 2021

In this video, Don Rush of WSDL Ocean City interviews several African American residents from Salisbury about their memories of the Georgetown neighborhood.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:10:07

Reeling in the Past! Allen, Maryland

August 9, 2023
Recorded February 15, 2021

Allen, Maryland is a special kind of place, where the people have made the difference in the quality of life there and the differences in those people that have kept the communities apart, but have also kept this sleepy rural community together. Celebrate their differences and the the similarities that make Allen, Maryland, truly, a state of mind and heaven on earth.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition collection, and the "Reel in the Past!" collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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31:45

Interview with Mildred Duffey James

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 3, 2016

Dr. Ray Thompson interviews Mildred Duffey James about her life and the "South Salisbury" African-American Neighborhood.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:01:12

Unshackling History: The Underground Railroad

August 9, 2023
Recorded January 16, 2016

Anthony Cohen, founder of the Menare Foundation, gives a description of the underground railroad and its operations in connection with the Eastern Shore.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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39:48

Reeling in the Past: The One Room School

August 9, 2023
Recorded May 1, 2008

Mary Gladys Jones, Lois Shipp Wilburn, and Evelyn Peters recall their memories of their elementary school years in a single-room school and how the challenges they faced shaped their youth.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage & Traditions "Reeling in the Past" series. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:19:01

The Families of San Domingo

August 9, 2023
Recorded February 3, 2011

Rudy Stanley & Newell Quinton provide histories on the Families of San Domingo, MD.

This video is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage & Traditions DVD Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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59:51

African Americans in World War One and Local Hero Sgt. William Butler

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 10, 2010

A presentation on African American troops and workers in World War I and Sgt. William Butler, presented by Stephen Gehnrich from Salisbury University.

This video is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage & Traditions DVD Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:07:10

African-American Tradition in Voice: Slave Spirituals & Gospel Music

August 9, 2023
Recorded October 29, 2010

An evening concert of African-American gospel music presented by the Society for the Preservation of African-American Arts Singers. October 29, 2010.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and History Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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34:52

Delmarva Today: "'Round the Pond, Georgetown of Salisbury, Maryland"

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 1, 2021

In this video, Don Rush of WSDL Ocean City interviews Linda Duyer about her book "'Round the Pond, Georgetown of Salisbury, Maryland". She speaks about how she became interested in the Georgetown neighborhood, some of the early history of that area, and the influence of African American oral history in her research.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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15:11

Reeling in the Past!: Memories of Downtown Salisbury

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 1, 2021

In this video, older Salisbury, MD, residents recall their memories of when Downtown Salisbury was at its prime and still widely visited in the mid-20th Century. Speakers include Pete Cooper, Bud Barkley, Henry Hannah, Marie Waller, and George Chevalier.

This recording is part of the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage and Tradition collection, and the "Reeling in the Past!" collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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57:25

Interview with Allen C. Brown, 25 July 2019

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 25, 2019

Allen Brown began teaching, and later administration, in 1968 right after integration had taken effect in Wicomico and Salisbury. He speaks of his experience as an administrator in the early 70's with the freshly-integrated schools and the community surrounding those schools during his career. He remained as a principal at Bennett Middle School until his retirement in 2008, where he later became a member of the Wicomico Board of Education where he remains as of 2019.

This interview is part of the Maryland Humanities Teachers' Institute: Documenting School Desegregation through Oral History collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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43:41

Interview with Newell Quinton, 11 July 2018

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 11, 2018

Newell Quinton is a veteran of the US Army Signal Corps during the Vietnam War. He was raised in and currently helps preserve the San Domingo community in Wicomico County. In this interview, he describes his tour of service and the intricacies of his duties in Vietnam as well as his time in the US Army Reserves after his tour was complete.

This interview is part of the Maryland Humanities Teacher’s Institute Veterans Oral History Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:36:02

Interview with Harry Church, 27 February 2019

August 9, 2023
Recorded February 27, 2019

Harry Church, age 84 at the date of the interview speaks about growing up on Delmarva and working for the Dorchester County Board of Education. Mr. Church’s property rests on what was his great grandfather’s farm. Mr. Church’s great grandfather was a slave, fought in the Civil War and used the pay received to purchase the land. Harry Church’s family has been on Delmarva since the Civil War era.

This interview is part of the Salisbury Growth and Development Oral History Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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23:57

Interview with Randall Parker, 12 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 12, 2005

In this interview, Charles Smith and Karen Smith interview Randall Parker; a World War II veteran from San Domingo, MD. Randal Smith talks about his upbringing in the area, including his life on a farm and his education through high school. He speaks about his time in a segregated US Army unit during World War II, describing his training, his involvement in the Invasion of Normandy in 1944, and his experiences as an African American during the war. He also talks about his community of San Domingo, MD, and some of the changes he's seen in recent years.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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21:32

Interview with Bernard Purnell, 12 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 12, 2004

Bernard Purnell is an African American World War II Veteran. In the interview, he speaks of his getting drafted and his introduction to the army, as well the experience of his community in the war. He describes his experience in training and deployment overseas, followed by his return from the war and transition to civilian work in Electricity. He also describes segregation in 1940s Salisbury, MD.
This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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42:48

Interview with Andrew Turner, 27 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 27, 2005

James Turner is a long-time educator in Wicomico County, serving at WorWic Community College and Parkside high school. In this interview, he describes his upbringing in the midst of segregation as an African American and his experience with the desegregation of Salisbury, MD. He also describes his various employments including law enforcement, Principal of a night school, and being a Pastor.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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25:30

Interview with Hortense Stanley, 13 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2005

In this interview, Mrs. Hortense Stanley describes her experiences of being an African American woman before, during, and after desegregation. She describes her education in segregated schools, her children's experiences during desegregation, and her life and experiences since then.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:26:16

Interview with Kermit Cottman, 14 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 14, 2004

In this interview, Karen Scott and Margaret Dize interview Kermit Cottman about his life as an educator and his role in the Civil Rights movement. Kermit Cottman describes his upbringing on a farm in Quantico, MD, and his education around the Eastern shore in Quantico, Laurel Delaware, and Salisbury High School. He describes the growth he saw on the eastern shore in Delaware and Salisbury and the growth of opportunities for African Americans as well. He also describes his career in education in Frederick Maryland, teaching social studies and science. He also speaks about his involvement in the Civil Right's movement and his experiences with discrimination and segregation at that time.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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21:46

Interview with Maybelle Smiley and Ernestine Brown, 13 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2005

This interview was conducted by Matt Gresick and Cristel Savage with Maybelle Smiley and Ernestine Brown. In this interview, Maybelle and Ernestine describe their lives in the early 20th century in San Domingo, MD, and their experiences with race relations at that time. They describe average life at that time, and their education in segregated schools as children as well as the impact of Brown v. Board of Education on their community. They comment on their experiences of segregation and racism, such as segregated restaurants and theaters. They also comment on race relations today compared to what they experienced when they were younger.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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28:21

Interview with Elaine Ross, 13 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2005

This interview was conducted by Matt Gresick and Christel Savage with Elaine Ross. In this interview, Elaine Ross describes her upbringing in San Domingo, MD, and her experiences with racial tension and race relations on the Eastern Shore in the early 20th Century. She describes how different races were educated at the time and the impact of Brown v. Board of Education, and other aspects of segregation that were felt. She also speaks of how those relations compare today.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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43:59

Interview with Josephine Anderson, 14 May 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded May 14, 2005

This interview was coducted by Patric Diettrich with Josephine Anderson on 14 May 2005. In this interview Josephine Anderson describes her upbringing in Whaleyville MD and her career as an educator in Worcester and Wicomico counties. She describes her time at the Germantown School for African Americans including the students, average routines, and other anecdotes. She describes the changes she had seen through the years in the various schools she had taught, including desegregation and changes to curriculum.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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43:25

Interview with Ruby Waters, 18 March 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 18, 2005

This interview was conducted by Richard Wilson and Donna Messick with Ruby Waters on March 18, 2005. In this interview, Ruby Waters describes her upbringing and life in Snow Hill MD in the early 20th Century. She describes recreation and education at that time, noting the various norms and requirements in her school and her time at UMES for high school. She also describes her time as an educator back in Snow Hill and later Germantown School, mentioning race relations at that time and her experiences with white and African American students.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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13:41

Interview with Laura Genevieve Jones, 13 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2004

In this interview, Laura Genevieve Jones describes her experiences in growing up during segregation and her education during that time. She also comments on some lessons to be learned from the experience and how those lessons relate to modern day issues.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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55:40

Interview with Dr. Kirkland Hall, 15 November 2019

August 9, 2023
Recorded November 15, 2019

Kirkland Hall is a curator at the Oaksville Baseball museum in Oaksville, Maryland. In the interview, he describes the influence of baseball on his childhood and the various teams that used to exist all over Delmarva. He also shares his passion for his local baseball field and the efforts to restore it and make baseball a fixture in the community again.

This interview is part of the Salisbury Baseball Oral History Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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24:41

Interview with Joseph Purnell, 14 May 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded May 14, 2005

In this interview, Joseph Purnell speaks about his experiences in going to school in the early 20th Century and the construction of the Germantown Elementary School in 1922. He talks about the importance of the school to his local community and the involvement of the Rosenwald Foundation to establishing the school for African Americans. He also speaks of the importance of heritage, in relation to the Germantown School Community Heritage Center, and its importance to future generations.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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21:57

Interview with Newell Quinton, 11 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 11, 2005

In this interview, Jan Robinson interviews Newell Quinton about his life in San Domingo, MD, the communities there and the importance of Rosenwald School to the community. They speak about various facets of the school including how lessons were taught and how those lessons sought to prepare students for life, as well as the importance of education to his community as a whole.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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37:34

Interview with Jessie Smiley, 12 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 12, 2005

In this interview, Jessie Smiley describes her memories of her town of San Domingo; a small area northwest of Salisbury, MD. She describes her experiences as an African American woman during segregation, her education in segregated schools including Maryland State College (UMES), and her life after desegregation. She also describes some of the local activities and persons she can remember from her town.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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25:56

Interview with Ed Taylor, 28 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 28, 2004

In this interview, Ed Taylor describes his experiences with segregation and his tour of duty during the Korean War. He describes the segregated neighborhoods and schools of his youth, then his being drafted for the Korean War and the process of integration he experienced there. He also describes the circumstances that earned him two Bronze Stars for his valor.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:15:24

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Robert Mollock, 24 August 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded August 24, 1998

This interview was conducted by Kelly Feltault with Robert Mollock near Elliot's Island, MD. In this interview, Robert discusses trapping, hunting, and farming traditions from this section of the eastern shore. He describes his history with trapping, beginning with hunting trips with his father, and the role of the tide in the placement of his many traps, hoping to trap muskrats, raccoons, and nutria; a dangerous large rodent. He describes the process of working in the fur and meat trade and the changes that have occurred in that business over the years with conservation and regulation in the area, and how the number of trappers has been decreasing from the lack of profit in the business. He also speaks about setting marsh fires to help with trapping, and the methods he employs to do that. In part 2, he continues his description of hunting, trapping, and farming. He speaks about working in cash crop orchards on Royer's Farms, describing how they would process the crops, who they would sell to, and how the farm has changed between then and now. He then speaks more about trapping, including dog training, and what he really enjoys from the process of trapping a wild animal.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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28:10

Crisfield Traditions in Time: Interview with Eugene Borden, 24 June 2003

August 9, 2023
Recorded June 24, 2003

Eugene Borden was an educator in Somerset County, MD. In this interview, he describes his upbringing and the influences on his life that led to his thirty-year career in education, as well as the various aspects of the Crisfield community that pertain to education. He also talks about the prominent Hispanic community in Crisfield, thanks to an influx of migrant workers, and his work with the Migrant Education Program. He also speaks about race relations and the impact of integration on the area, noting that everything seemed to go smoothly.

This interview is part of the Crisfield Traditions in Time Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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51:21

Crisfield Traditions in Time: Interview with Hazel Cropper, 26 June 2003

August 9, 2023
Recorded June 26, 2003

This interview was conducted with "Hurricane" Hazel Cropper, a Crisfield native and professional crab picker who won the Crab Derby picking contest ten times at the time of the interview. In the interview, she describes her upbringing and introduction to crab picking, noting her strategies and shortcomings when it came to competitions. She also talks about how her talent benefitted her on the road, demonstrating her abilities in Philadelphia and Baltimore, impressing crowds, and earning some press coverage for her talents.

This interview is part of the Crisfield Traditions in Time Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:06:40

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Rachel Logan, 12 December 1997

August 9, 2023
Recorded December 12, 1997

This interview was conducted with Rachel Logan in Chincoteague, VA. In this interview, she talks about her life and some foodways she's learned over the years. She speaks about her upbringing in Mappsville, VA, before moving to Chincoteague in 1942. She describes the various jobs she's had, eventually settling as a prep cook creating crab cakes and steaks for the Beachway Restaurant, noting some of the facets in how she made her crab cakes (recipe redacted). She talks about the African American community in Chincoteague, speaking about their work on the water and involvement in the seafood business. She talks more about life on the island, speaking of church life, music, and dancing. She mentions some of the changes on the island, mentioning how new generations don't want to continue family work, and the influences of churches in the area. In part 2, she speaks more on the spiritual aspect of her life and the influence of religion on her and her family. Through the course of this section, she describes her personal relationship with god and her lifelong connection with the almighty. She speaks of prayer and how she prays for people, noting her unique method of praying. She also speaks of the changes in raising children today vs in the past, noting a greater presence of "the devil" in modern society.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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31:20

Interview with Charlene Boston (Part 1), 1 May 2006

August 9, 2023
Recorded May 1, 2006

Charlene Boston was an educator in Baltimore City beginning in the late 1960's, later becoming the Superintendent of schools for the Wicomico County Public School system in Salisbury, MD, until her retirement in June 2006. In this interview, she describes her upbringing in Baltimore, her education, and the beginning of her teaching career around Baltimore City in the late 1960's.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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34:07

Interview with Charlene Boston (Part 2 & 3), 1 May 2006

August 9, 2023
Recorded May 1, 2006

Charlene Boston was an educator in Baltimore City beginning in the late 1960's, later becoming the Superintendent of schools for the Wicomico County Public School system in Salisbury, MD, until her retirement in June 2006. In this interview, she describes how she attained the position of Superintendent of Schools as well as some of the challenges she faced in the position. She also speaks about racial issues in the 1960's and during her time as an educator. The second recording (part 3) is the final minutes of the interview. The interviewers and Dr. Boston chat about her family name, Goldsboro, and the origins of the name.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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25:22

Interview with Gertrude Brown, 8 July 2005

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 8, 2005

In this interview, Mrs. Gertrude Brown speaks about her upbringing in Sharptown, MD, and the influence school had on her life. She speaks of her education and her experiences in integration and as an African-American in the early and mid 1960s.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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14:37

Interview with Thomas Dennis, 13 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2004

In this brief interview, Thomas Dennis describes his early life including his education and the various facets that existed around Eden, MD, in the 1920's, 30's, and 40's. He remarks on his philosophy of life and his observations about how the world has changed during his life.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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31:43

Interview with Samuel Everett, 13 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2004

Samuel Everett is an Educator in the Wicomico County Public Schools. In the interview, he describes his early education, his life in a segregated city, his attendance at the Maryland State College (now UMES) and his experience with integration in the mid-1960s.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:05:54

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Martha Mifflin, 1 April 1999

August 9, 2023
Recorded April 1, 1999

This interview was conducted by Katherine Borland with Martha Mifflin in Georgetown, Delaware, on April 1st, 1999. In this interview, she describes her life as an African American worker and mother after the 1960s. She describes her decision to raise her kids, working part time jobs when she had the time to do so to supplement her income before becoming a full-time housewife. She describes her relationship with her six children and how she and her husband cultivated a close relationship between the siblings, noting the activities and practices they employed to do so (and the people that influenced her decisions in that). She then describes the various jobs she took, including some of her work in the "Poverty Program" at the local school, and other jobs in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s. (Correction: Oldest daughter works for Episcopal Diocese in Wilmington) In part 2, she continues her discussion about raising her kids and some local history. She speaks of some local folklore, mentioning her father's dancing and her mother's singing. She also talks about the presence of singing in her life from her school days to her adult life, eventually letting it fade away until church time comes. She also talks about the changes she's seen in church life from when she was younger compared to now, noting the inclusion of modern music in church life and her being ordained as a female assistant in her community.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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44:41

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Mary Onley, 18 July 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 18, 1998

This interview was conducted by Douglas Day with Mary Onley near Painter, VA. In this interview, Mary Onley talks about her interest in paper mache and making paper mache hats. She describes her methods for creating and painting the paper mache hats and the various types that she makes, usually large brimmed hats, and some of her other paper mache crafts, including clocks. She doesn't describe it as paper mache, but more of a recycling of newspaper. She describes when she began making paper mache only a few years earlier as she sought to do something with her excess newspaper, also making paper mache figurines and scenes. She also describes her life outside of art, working in vegetable fields as a crew leader and in shirt factories, and her family and their lives. She talks about some of the art scenes that she makes and the inspiration behind them, including family events and other occurrences. She also describes the process of trying to sell her art and her involvement with the artist guild.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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2:08:50

Delmarva Folklife Project: Performance by Burley Strand, 14 February 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded February 14, 1998

This is a recording of Burley Strand's band performance on February 14, 1998. The music is a combination of jazz and funk with a mix of instrumental and vocal songs. Audio quality is mixed as the mic volume is very high. Burley Strand, also known as "Mr. B", was a popular local musician in Accomack county, VA. Recording by Douglas Day.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:13:31

1963 Cambridge Movement audio recordings from WWDC

August 9, 2023
Recorded October 25, 1963

WARNING: RECORDINGS CONTAIN HARMFUL AND OFFENSIVE WORDS AND PHRASES CONCERNING RACE, INCLUDING EXPLICIT LANGUAGE

Recorded during the 1963 unrest during the Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge, Maryland, these audio recordings capture the unedited sounds of both protesters and segregationists. The recordings were made primarily by reporter John Goldsmith for the District of Columbia radio station, WWDC.

In the first recording, there are protesters in front of the Dorchester County Courthouse singing “Woke Up This Morning (With My Mind Stayed On Freedom),” “We Shall Overcome,” “Star Spangled Banner,” and the “Pledge of Allegiance.” Also included are three speeches from different individuals, one a reverend, about injustice and racial inequality that outlines their goals for desegregation. There are also moments with segregationist songs and chants as they marched through the city.

In the second recording, there are primarily white segregationists who expressed their reasons for counter-protesting the Cambridge Movement. This recording contains explicit and offensive words and language. Some of the white mob members that became angry with the WWDC reporter were later arrested and identified in the third recording featuring the WWDC broadcast.

The third recording features the WWDC broadcast that used clips from the first two audio recordings and includes additional reporting about the Cambridge Movement. Many of the individuals heard in the first two recordings are identified in the WWDC broadcast, including Bishop Williams and one of the white rioters who was arrested.

These recordings come from the J. Millard Tawes papers (2017.060) at the Nabb Research Center and are within the Creative Commons (with restrictions). Please contact us at nabbcenter@salisbury.edu with any concerns about copyright.

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1:19:39

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Deloris Blakey, 21 August 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded August 21, 1998

This interview was conducted by Kelly Feltault with Deloris Blakey in Dover, Delaware, on August 21, 1998. In this interview, Deloris Blakey talks about segregation in Delaware and the influence of dance in her life. She speaks about her time as a teacher in Delaware and Delaware State in the 1960s and how desegregation affected the area, African Americans, and the interaction of Whites with African American culture and vice versa. She also speaks about the influence of dance, mentioning dancing at the USO Club, the various dances in Wilmington and the styles used at the time, and the importance of dance and music to the African American community. In Part 2, Deloris Blakey continues her discussion of the influence on dance in her life, noting its presence in physical education in schools alongside traditional sports. She describes her participation in sports and dance and how various styles of dance work.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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46:39

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Leola and Maude Smack, 31 July 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 31, 1998

This interview was conducted by Kelly Feltault with Leola and Maude smack in Berlin, MD. in this interview, Leola and Maude describe their lives as African American Midwives. Leola describes the rooms where they would treat their patients and the various procedures they would implement in order to properly help with the birth, comparing it to modern births. They describe how they received their training, mostly from the local clinic but also through working with aunt Jenny Dale Tingle, an experienced midwife. They also describe their home town of Whaleysville, MD, and the culture/ daily life around there.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:32:51

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Edith Maddox & Sam Maddox, 14 August 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded August 14, 1998

This interview was conducted by Kelly Feltault with Edith and Sam Maddox in Tyaskin, MD. In this interview, they talk about their life and the changes they've seen in the area over time. They begin by speaking about the cultural importance of sassafras root and how they make sassafras tea and other home remedies. Edith talks about her younger life in Whitehaven, remembering the work that people did including "tonging" in the winter and working in canneries in the summer. She also speaks about moving north during WWII and working as a riveter in an airplane factory. They both speak about changes in the area, noting the closing of important factories and lack of younger workers on farms. In part 2, they continue their description of life around Tyaskin and Whitehaven and the changes they've seen. They talk about the security of life, leaving doors unlocked, and the close relationship of communities when they were younger. They also talk about work increased security during World War II, both at the factories where Edith riveted planes and at home where they had to black out windows. Edith also describes some of the entertainment in those days, including the Worlds' Fair in NY and Coney Island, and the different acts and shows that could be seen. Sam talks more about work in the area including oyster dredging and farming, as well as the challenges those industries had been facing at that time.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:23:22

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Stevon Sample, 17 January 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded January 17, 1998

This interview was conducted by Kelly Feltault with Stevon Sample in Exmore, VA. In this interview, he describes his introduction to graphic design and the various work's he's done. He describes how he began drawing and his inspiration for drawing, noting some symbols and visions that have inspired some of his work. He speaks about his comics, the materials and mediums he uses, and the meanings he hopes to put behind them, trying to reach the youth and covey feelings from experiences that they might relate to. He also describes his church, Night Faith Church of Deliverance, and the influences religion has on his art and daily life. He also describes some of the works and murals he's done for businesses and his church, describing what they depict and the work that went into them (with a description of processing chicken at a chicken plant that he made a safety mural for). In part 2, he continues his discussion about his art and inspirations for his art. He describes his involvement with WAVES (Workers Alliance of the Virginia Eastern Shore) and the various people that were involved with that organization, and his experiences at various expeditions that allowed him to show off his art. He also mentions his participation at the "Art Expose" at "Local Shores", conducted by Lucy Harlow, where he was able to show his work to a more affluent crowd. He also speaks about the needs of artists, most notably exposure for their work.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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2:23:18

Delmarva Folklife Project: Interview with Lena Trower, 2 March 1998

August 9, 2023
Recorded March 2, 1998

This interview was conducted by Kelly Feltault with Lena Trower in Exmore, VA. in this interview, Lena Trower describes her life and her involvement in the clam, oyster, and conch business, as well as nursing an invalid man. She describes her job working at Bernie Conch picking conch and working in a clam house, paid by the bucket. She describes the work environment and the tools she used, describing how she would clean a clam for work and how she learned to do the work. She also talks about the social aspect of the shucking house, noting the work ethic and sense of community that the shuckers had, as well as her boss, Bernie, and his involvement with the workers. She also describes some of the foodways with conch cooking and other sea-foodstuffs, mentioning the various recipes and methods she often uses or has used. In part 2, she speaks more of her life as a conch shucker and a mother. She describes her life with her kids, including the importance of religion in the family, and the challenges she faced as an African American mother. She also describes her work with taking care of "trouble makers" in her community and raising them to be respectful, hard working men when they left. She describes more of the cooking she would do with conchs and soul food, noting how she would sometimes eat conch while she worked at the shucking house, sharing fond memories of her past job. In part 3, she speaks more about her younger life on a farm, describing some of the livestock they raised like ducks, geese, and hogs. She describes processing and cleaning ducks and her method for plucking feathers. She also speaks more of her mother on the farm, helping her clean chickens for dinners. She also mentions her pride in the children she raised and how happy she is in how well they turned out.

This interview is part of the Delmarva Folklife Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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56:19

Interview with William T. Miles, 12 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 12, 2004

Mr. William T. Miles is a retired teacher and administrator from Wicomico and Somerset counties. In the interview, he speaks about life on the Eastern Shore for African Americans, segregated baseball leagues, and baseball games between African Americans and whites. He also speaks about the Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame and a Mr. Sam Doane; a prominant member of the Hall of Fame's Board of Directors.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid

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55:37

Interview with Jennings Leroy Muir, 14 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 14, 2004

Mr. Jennings Muir is the curator of the Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame in Salisbury, MD. In the interview, he talks about the Eastern Shore minor leagues in the early 1900's, and the influence of African Americans in Major League baseball.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:01:17

Interview with Kenneth Maurice Bailey and Mildred Bailey, 22 August 2017

August 9, 2023
Recorded August 22, 2017

Kenneth and Maurice belong to Grace United Methodist Church in Tyaskin, MD. Kenneth and Maurice discuss their memories of the church and the surrounding area of their youth as well as how the church was forced to close while under their care.

This interview is from the Regional Church Preservation Oral Histories Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:06:32

Interview with Daniel Savoy, 30 September 2019

August 9, 2023
Recorded September 30, 2019

Daniel Savoy was an educator and administrator in Wicomico County. He describes growing up on a sharecropper farm, then moving towards his desire to become an educator. He attended Maryland State College (UMES) in the 1960's during a time of racial tension in Princess Anne, MD, and describes his experiences of being an African-American student at that time. He later became a teacher in Wicomico County, culminating in his being the vice-principal and principal of James M. Bennet High until 1997 when he retired.

This interview is part of the Maryland Humanities Teachers' Institute: Documenting School Desegregation through Oral History collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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21:40

Interview with Anne Dashield, 13 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2004

In this interview, Anne Dashield describes her experience growing up as an African American in the Salisbury area in the 1930's and 40's. She speaks of her education, the civil rights movement and strife in the 60's, as well as some of her experiences with discrimination.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:11:33

Interview with Mary Gladys Jones, 2 July 2019

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 2, 2019

Mary Gladys Jones is a renowned community member in Fruitland, MD, and a retired educator in Wicomico country. She describes her move into education in the early 1940's and 50's and her experience as one of the first African-American teachers to be assigned to a previously all-white school in Salisbury, MD. She chronicles her experience as an educator in Wicomico county and as a founding member of the Fruitland Community Center after her retirement in 1981.

This interview is part of the Maryland Humanities Teachers' Institute: Documenting School Desegregation through Oral History collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:21:45

Interview with Ed Taylor, 11 July 2018

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 11, 2018

Ed Taylor is a Korean War veteran who was awarded two Bronze Stars for his valor. He talks of his tour of service, including his actions in combat that resulted in his two Bronze Stars, the integration of the military, and his passion in his hometown bridge over Tyaskin Creek near Wetipquin, Maryland.

This interview is part of the Maryland Humanities Teacher’s Institute Veterans Oral History Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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33:28

Interview with Rachel Polk, 15 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 15, 2004

In this interview, Rachel Polk describes her memories of segregation and desegregation in Wicomico County during the 1960's. She speaks of her memories of Salisbury High School and her transition to Wicomico High, her treatment, and her analysis of Desegregation and Integration in the community and school system.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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15:58

Interview with Betty Roberta Smith, 13 July 2004

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 13, 2004

In this interview, Betty Roberta Smith recalls her memories of growing up in the era of segregation in Salisbury, MD. She recalls her time at Fruitland Elementary and Salisbury High School as well as her memories of the Civil Rights movement and its legacy in Princess Anne, south of Salisbury.

This interview is part of the Teaching American History Program. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:11:48

Crisfield Traditions in Time: Interview with Tyrane Lane, 23 June 2003

August 9, 2023
Recorded June 23, 2003

Tyrane Lane was an owner of a department store named "Salty Dog" in Crisfield at the time of recording. In this interview, Tyrane describes his upbringing in Crisfield in the 1970s and 1980s, noting the presence of the seafood business in the town at that time, and the changes he's seen in the area since then. He describes the influence of his time in Philadelphia on his business ideas and his inspiration to create his store in Crisfield, primarily selling modern fashion. He also speaks about some of his other business ventures and employment, mentioning a Boat Cruise and a desire to sell Crisfield crabs in Philadelphia. He later speaks more about Crisfield itself and how it has degraded in his lifetime, both financially and spiritually.

This interview is part of the Crisfield Traditions in Time Project. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center Finding Aid.

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1:28:43

Interview with Nevette Wesley Muir, 17 July 2019

August 9, 2023
Recorded July 17, 2019

Nevette Muir was an educator and administrator in Wicomico county from 1972 until his retirement. He speaks of his various experiences related to the many schools he taught and administered at, focusing around how the school system was faring with the newly-desegregated schools in both Fruitland and Salisbury, MD.

This interview is part of the Maryland Humanities Teachers' Institute: Documenting School Desegregation through Oral History collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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1:19:58

Haitian Migrant Farm Workers on the Eastern Shore

August 8, 2023
Recorded February 18, 2013

A presentation on Haitian workers on the Eastern Shore by Phil Decker. February 18, 2013.

This recording is from the Digitizing Delmarva Heritage & Traditions DVD Collection. For more information, see the Edward H. Nabb Center finding aid.

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