Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture Enduring Connections: Exploring Delmarva's Black History

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Free Black Families of Colonial Delmarva (abstracted by Paul Heinegg)

Number of Records
104

Date Added
June 17, 2022

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All Records in Free Black Families of Colonial Delmarva (abstracted by Paul Heinegg)

Family Name Armstrong
Family History Notes Members of the Armstrong family in Maryland were i. Bayham, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. ii. Rachel, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:517]. iii. Jacob, born say 1760. Jacob Armstrong, born say 1760, made a Worcester County deed of manumission to his daughter Lycia Armstrong, born of his wife Comfort, a slave to William Selby, on 26 April 1787 [DB M:173]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:832] and 6 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [MD:636]. He was the father of Lycia. iv. Rachel, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:517]. v. Nanny, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:735]. vi. Rhoda, head of a Worcester County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:832]. vii. Stephen, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:589]. viii. George, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. ix. Peggy, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Worcester
Other Counties Talbot
Family Name Armstrong
Family History Notes Members of the Armstrong family in Maryland were i. Bayham, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. ii. Rachel, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:517]. iii. Jacob, born say 1760. Jacob Armstrong, born say 1760, made a Worcester County deed of manumission to his daughter Lycia Armstrong, born of his wife Comfort, a slave to William Selby, on 26 April 1787 [DB M:173]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:832] and 6 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [MD:636]. He was the father of Lycia. iv. Rachel, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:517]. v. Nanny, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:735]. vi. Rhoda, head of a Worcester County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:832]. vii. Stephen, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:589]. viii. George, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. ix. Peggy, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.
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Family Name Armwood
Family History Notes 1. Jemima Armwood, born say 1740, was taxable in John Tull's Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1757 [List of Taxables]. She was prosecuted in Somerset County, Maryland Court in 1759 for having an illegitimate child by a "negro slave" [Judicial Records 1757-61, 236]. She (or perhaps a daughter by the same name) was a "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:733]. She was probably the mother of i. James, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:762] and 7 in 1810 [MD:612] and 5 "free colored" in 1830. ii. Daniel, born say 1765. (Note 2) iii. Waify, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. 2. Daniel Armwood, born say 1765, was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:796] and 11 "free colored" in 1830. He was apparently married to a slave as he made a deed of manumission to his children and grandchildren on 4 September 1823. He sold a horse, carriage, harness, cart and six hogs to John Dennis in Worcester County for $100 on 20 April 1832 [DB AP:189-190; AY:61]. His children were i. Easter, born about 1797, and her children Zeppa, John, Levi, Ann, Patience and Mill. ii. Nancy, born about 1797. iii. Patience, born about 1798, iv. Nelly, born about 1802, and her children Henry and Elisa. v. Sally, born about 1802.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Worcester
Family Name Armwood
Family History Notes 1. Jemima Armwood, born say 1740, was taxable in John Tull's Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1757 [List of Taxables]. She was prosecuted in Somerset County, Maryland Court in 1759 for having an illegitimate child by a "negro slave" [Judicial Records 1757-61, 236]. She (or perhaps a daughter by the same name) was a "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:733]. She was probably the mother of i. James, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:762] and 7 in 1810 [MD:612] and 5 "free colored" in 1830. ii. Daniel, born say 1765. (Note 2) iii. Waify, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. 2. Daniel Armwood, born say 1765, was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:796] and 11 "free colored" in 1830. He was apparently married to a slave as he made a deed of manumission to his children and grandchildren on 4 September 1823. He sold a horse, carriage, harness, cart and six hogs to John Dennis in Worcester County for $100 on 20 April 1832 [DB AP:189-190; AY:61]. His children were i. Easter, born about 1797, and her children Zeppa, John, Levi, Ann, Patience and Mill. ii. Nancy, born about 1797. iii. Patience, born about 1798, iv. Nelly, born about 1802, and her children Henry and Elisa. v. Sally, born about 1802.
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Family Name Bantum
Family History Notes Members of the Bantum family of Maryland were i. James, born say 1730. (Note 1) ii. Gabriel, head of a Caroline County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. iii. Delia, said to be over 100 years old when she was head of a Talbot County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. iv. George, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1790. v. Sally, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:531]. vi. Joe, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:527] and 3 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Nancy Banthum, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. viii. Diana, born before 1776, head of a Kent County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. 1. James Bantum, born say 1730, was a "Molatto servant man" listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of William Brooke on 7 May 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:114-8]. He may have been the father of i. James, born about 1757. (Note 2) 2. James Bantum, born about 1757, was head of a Talbot County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:534]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 24 May 1815: a Black man ... about 58 years of age, 5 feet 10 3/4 inches high, has the top of his head bald ... was manumitted & set free by ... Wm Thomas. He may have been the father of i. Levin, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 27 May 1807: a Mullatto Man about twenty four years of age, five feet seven and a half inches high ... free born of a white woman and bound to Christopher Bruff until he was twenty one years of age. ii. Edward, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 23 July 1810: a black man ... about 20 years of age, 5 feet 7 1/2 inches high ... dark complection ... free born ... raised in this County. iii. Harry, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 20 March 1810: a black man ... about 22 years of age, 5 feet 9 inches & an half high, complection dark Coffee [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 30, 43, 46, 174]. iv. Moses, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 12 April 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... born free [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 24].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Caroline, Dorchester, Kent
Family Name Bantum
Family History Notes Members of the Bantum family of Maryland were i. James, born say 1730. (Note 1) ii. Gabriel, head of a Caroline County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. iii. Delia, said to be over 100 years old when she was head of a Talbot County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. iv. George, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1790. v. Sally, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:531]. vi. Joe, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:527] and 3 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Nancy Banthum, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. viii. Diana, born before 1776, head of a Kent County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. 1. James Bantum, born say 1730, was a "Molatto servant man" listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of William Brooke on 7 May 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:114-8]. He may have been the father of i. James, born about 1757. (Note 2) 2. James Bantum, born about 1757, was head of a Talbot County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:534]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 24 May 1815: a Black man ... about 58 years of age, 5 feet 10 3/4 inches high, has the top of his head bald ... was manumitted & set free by ... Wm Thomas. He may have been the father of i. Levin, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 27 May 1807: a Mullatto Man about twenty four years of age, five feet seven and a half inches high ... free born of a white woman and bound to Christopher Bruff until he was twenty one years of age. ii. Edward, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 23 July 1810: a black man ... about 20 years of age, 5 feet 7 1/2 inches high ... dark complection ... free born ... raised in this County. iii. Harry, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 20 March 1810: a black man ... about 22 years of age, 5 feet 9 inches & an half high, complection dark Coffee [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 30, 43, 46, 174]. iv. Moses, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 12 April 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... born free [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 24].
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Family Name Barber
Family History Notes 1. Rebecca Barber, born say 1735, was a spinster white servant of Thomas Ozenent in November 1755 when she admitted to the Talbot County court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court sold her four-month-old son Amos until the age of thirty-one for 5 shillings [Criminal Record 1751-5, 14-5]. She was the mother of i. Amos, born about July 1755. Other members of the family were i. David, born before 1776, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:42]. ii. Simon, born 1776-1794, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:42].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Barber
Family History Notes 1. Rebecca Barber, born say 1735, was a spinster white servant of Thomas Ozenent in November 1755 when she admitted to the Talbot County court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court sold her four-month-old son Amos until the age of thirty-one for 5 shillings [Criminal Record 1751-5, 14-5]. She was the mother of i. Amos, born about July 1755. Other members of the family were i. David, born before 1776, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:42]. ii. Simon, born 1776-1794, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:42].
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Family Name Barrett
Family History Notes 1. Violet Barrott, born say 1720, wife of Darby Barrott, was living in St. Michael's Parish in August 1744 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having a child by a "Mulatto slave." The court sold her as a servant for seven years [Judgment Record 1743-4, 352]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Ann, born say 1743, a "Mulatto" woman who the constable (tax collector) claimed was married to a white man named John Start who did not list her as a taxable in Talbot County. The jury acquitted him in November 1758 [Criminal Record 1755-61, 254]. ii. Susannah, a spinster householder who was charged by the constable (tax collector) in Talbot County in November 1758 for failing to pay tax on her person [Criminal Record 1755-61, 243]. iii. Mary, a "Mulatto" woman who the constable claimed was married to and living with Thomas Condon, a white man, who did not list her as a taxable. The jury found Condon not guilty in June 1759 [Criminal Record 1755-61, 245, 253]. iv. Jacob, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:118]. v. Isaac, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:124], 4 in 1810 [DE:73] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:17]. vi. Philip, head of a New Castle County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301]. vii. George, "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:3] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:39]. viii. James, "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:6] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:22]. ix. Samuel, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Kent, New Castle
Family Name Barrett
Family History Notes 1. Violet Barrott, born say 1720, wife of Darby Barrott, was living in St. Michael's Parish in August 1744 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having a child by a "Mulatto slave." The court sold her as a servant for seven years [Judgment Record 1743-4, 352]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Ann, born say 1743, a "Mulatto" woman who the constable (tax collector) claimed was married to a white man named John Start who did not list her as a taxable in Talbot County. The jury acquitted him in November 1758 [Criminal Record 1755-61, 254]. ii. Susannah, a spinster householder who was charged by the constable (tax collector) in Talbot County in November 1758 for failing to pay tax on her person [Criminal Record 1755-61, 243]. iii. Mary, a "Mulatto" woman who the constable claimed was married to and living with Thomas Condon, a white man, who did not list her as a taxable. The jury found Condon not guilty in June 1759 [Criminal Record 1755-61, 245, 253]. iv. Jacob, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:118]. v. Isaac, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:124], 4 in 1810 [DE:73] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:17]. vi. Philip, head of a New Castle County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301]. vii. George, "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:3] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:39]. viii. James, "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:6] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:22]. ix. Samuel, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.
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Family Name Bass
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Bass, born in 1664, was the "Mallatto" daughter of a white woman and a "negro man," the servants of John White of Virginia. Sarah was about eight years old on 13 August 1672 when John White brought her into Somerset County Court to have her bound to him as an apprentice. She agreed to serve him until the age of twenty-one, and he gave her a cow and calf and their increase on the condition that she serve her full term [Archives of Maryland 87:155]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Griffin, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 15 "other free" in 1800 [MD:44]. He married Nicey/ Unicy Durham, widow of Daniel Durham before 28 April 1801 when Daniel's Kent County, Delaware will was proved [de Valinger, Probate Records of Kent County]. ii. Phil, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:547].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Kent, Talbot
Family Name Bass
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Bass, born in 1664, was the "Mallatto" daughter of a white woman and a "negro man," the servants of John White of Virginia. Sarah was about eight years old on 13 August 1672 when John White brought her into Somerset County Court to have her bound to him as an apprentice. She agreed to serve him until the age of twenty-one, and he gave her a cow and calf and their increase on the condition that she serve her full term [Archives of Maryland 87:155]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Griffin, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 15 "other free" in 1800 [MD:44]. He married Nicey/ Unicy Durham, widow of Daniel Durham before 28 April 1801 when Daniel's Kent County, Delaware will was proved [de Valinger, Probate Records of Kent County]. ii. Phil, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:547].
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Family Name Beckett
Family History Notes 1. Peter1 Beckett, born say 1655, was a "Negro" slave who was taxable with Thomas Driggers from 1671 to 1677 in the Northampton County, Virginia household of John Eyres [Orders 1664-74, fol.114; 1674-79, 75, 191]. Sarah Dawson, a white servant, was another member of Eyre's household. She was born about 1661 since her age was adjudged to be sixteen years when Eyre brought her into Northampton County court on 26 November 1677 [OW 1674-79, 203]. Seven years later in 1684 she was given twenty-one lashes and ordered to serve Eyre another six years for having "three bastard Maletto Children by her said Masters Negro slave Peter." On 30 May 1687 and 28 May 1688 she was presented for bastard bearing and the following year on 29 July 1689 was called "Sarah the wife of Peter Beckett slave to Major John Eyre" when the court ordered one of her children released to her, "Shee findinge sufficient security to save the parish harmeless from the said Childe" [OW 1683-89, 59, 280, 292, 358, 442-3]. On 28 July 1702 she consented to the indenture of their daughter Ann, "daughter of Sarah Beckett," to Mrs. Ann Eyre until the age of eighteen [OW 1698-1710, 96]. Peter was free by 30 November 1703 when "Peter Beckett and Sarah his wife" successfully sued John Morrine for debt in Northampton County court. John Robins brought an action upon the case against him, but neither party appeared when it came for trial on 21 January 1717/8 [OW&c 1698-1710, 176; Orders 1710-6, 55]. Peter and Sarah's descendants were 2 i. ?Peter2, born say 1683. ii. Rebecca1, born say 1692, taxable in the household of John Drighouse in 1726 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 77]. 3 iii. ?William1, born say 1695. iv. Ann, born 10 December 1697, had a child by John Driggers in Northampton County in 1716. v. Jean, born say 1700, common-law wife of Thomas Driggers of Northampton County. vi. Elizabeth, born say 1705, common-law wife of John Driggers/ Drighouse. 2. Peter2 Beckett, born say 1683, was taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred of Somerset County from 1723 to 1740: listed with Devorix Driggers in 1725, with (his son?) William B____et in 1737, with (his son?) Deverix Becket in 1740 [MdHR C-812, List of Taxables, 1723-1740]. He was fined 2 shillings, 6 pence for uttering an oath in Somerset County in 1727. He was special bail for Devorix Driggers on 17 November 1730 when Devorix admitted in Somerset County court that he owed Christopher Glass 500 pounds of tobacco and 650 pounds of beef which he had contracted for in writing on 10 November 1729 [Judicial Record 1727-30, 147; 1730-3, 43-4]. The inventory of his Worcester County estate, taken by Arcada Okey on 10 May 1751, totalled 129 pounds and listed Bridget Doves and John Nienburgh as nearest of kin. The second inventory taken on 23 January 1754 by Joseph and his wife Arcada Okey included debts from William Cornish, Simon Collock, and Nathaniel Morris. One third of the estate went to Peter's widow Mary Beckett and the remainder to his son Beade Beckett and daughters Arcada Oakey and Hannah Beckett. The estate paid Samuel Handser 7 shillings [Prerogative Inventories 48:98-100; 60:89; Accounts 37:65-6; Balance Book 1751-5, 1:127 (MSA 533-1)]. Peter was the father of i. ?William2, born say 1716. ii. Arcada, married Joseph Okey. iii. Hannah. iv. ?Deverix, born say 1723, taxable in Somerset county in 1740, probably named for Deverix Driggers. v. ?Solomon, taxable in Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1743 to 1762 [Kent County Assessments, 1743-67, frames 10, 109, 125, 154, 174, 201, 204, 216, 247, 270, 349]. 4 vi. Bede1, born say 1740. 3. William1 Beckett, born say 1695, was taxable in Kent County, Delaware, from 1726 to 1756: listed in Little Creek Hundred, charged with the tax of _____ Drigers in 1727, called William Beckett Sen. from 1749 to 1756 when he was listed in Dover Hundred near Nehemiah Hansor and Samuel Hanson [Kent County Levy List 1743-67]. William was called a yeoman when he purchased two lots of ground within the town of Dover for 12 pounds by Kent County, Delaware deed on 2 April 1754 [DB O:256]. He left a 31 January 1757 Kent County will (signing the letter "B"), proved 7 May 1757, leaving Mary Concelor a bed, furniture and a sorrel mare; his daughter Comfort a horse; his son Nathan a gun; his son William a shilling; his daughters Sarah and Mary each a mare; and his wife Comfort all his lands. Nehemiah Handzor witnessed the will [WB K-1, 162]. William was probably the father of the illegitimate child Mary Concelor had in Kent County in August 1728 [Delaware Archives RG 3815.031, dockets 1722-32, frames 229, 235]. And he was probably related to a "Mulatto" child Abraham Beckitt who was supported by Richard Wells (of Dover Hundred), Esq., from the county levy in November 1757 and Tabitha Beckett, a poor woman, supported by Lydia Wells from Kent County levy in November 1758 [DSA, RG 3200, Levy Court Minutes 1732-, frames 34, 38; RG 3535, Assessments 1743-67, frames 221, 223]. Comfort and her daughter Mary Beckett sold 50 acres in Dover Hundred, Kent County, on the north side of the Dover River on 31 March 1758 [DB P:65]. Mary Beckett sold 50 acres in Dover Hundred, Kent County, on the north side of the Dover River on 31 March 1758 [DB P:111]. William was the father of 5 i. William3, born say 1720. ii. Comfort, born say 1723. iii. Nathan, born say 1728, taxable in Dover Hundred in 1758 and 1759 [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 213, 240]. iv. Sarah, born say 1734. v. Mary, born say 1736, charged Rike Miller in November 1771 with being the father of her illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805, MS, indictments]. 4. Bede1 Beckett, born about 1738, was a twenty-one-year-old, born in Maryland, who was listed in the 11 May 1759 muster of Captain John Wright's Company in the French and Indian War (abstracted as "Bedy Bullett," in the same list with Samuel and Thomas Hanzer of Sussex County, that included mostly men born in Sussex County [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 278-9]. He married Ann Butler (no race indicated for either) in Sussex County on 21 April 1763 and their son William was born on 12 July 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 274]. Bede, a labourer, purchased 118 acres called Good Luck on the east side of the Green Branch in Sussex County on __ May 1764 for 37 pounds [DB K-11:60]. He was a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, taxable in Broadkiln Hundred in 1774, a Nanticoke Hundred delinquent in 1787 [Delaware Archives, Levy Assessment RG 2535]. He died about 1787 when Peter Beckett was granted administration on his estate [de Valinger, Calendar of Kent County Probate Records 1680-1800, 181]. He was the father of i. William4, born 12 July 1768, called William Butler Beckett when he was taxable in Sussex County in Nanticoke Hundred near Peter Beckett in 1791 and in Little Creek Hundred in 1796 [Levy Assessment List, RG 2535]. ii. ?Bede2, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred adjoining Peter Beckett in 1795. 5. William3 Beckett, born say 1720, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1741 and 1742: in the same list as Samuel Hanson; taxable in Dover Hundred from 1748 to 1769: listed in Samuel Hanson's levy in 1748 (called "William Beckitt Jur"), perhaps deceased in 1769 when he was a Dover Hundred delinquent [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 437, 494, 508; 1768-1784, 26, 32]. In November 1752 he was fined 5 pounds by the Kent County court for keeping a tippling house without a license [RG 3805.002, Court of General Sessions, frame 214]. He was called William Beckett Junr, yeoman, on 13 February 1754 when he purchased 100 acres in the forest of Murderkill Hundred on the north side of Milstons Bridge for 35 pounds [DB O:220]. He may have had a child by one of Samuel Hanson's slaves. On 27 January 1770 Hanson made a deed of manumission by which he freed three slaves named Beckett: i. Charles, born about December 1740, a "Negro" about 30 years and one month old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free by manumission recorded in May 1775 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He was a "Negro" head of a Dover Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:97]. ii. Peter2, born about June 1744, a "Negro" about 25 years and seven months old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in the Revolutionary War and received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,483; 54,830; 54,938; 55,184; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He married Betty Drigas (Driggers) on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. He was administrator of the Sussex County estate of Bede Beckett in 1787 [de Valinger, Calendar of Kent County Probate Records 1680-1800, 181]. On 3 October 1792 he and his wife Elizabeth of Broadkiln Hundred sold for 120 pounds 118 acres in Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, which Peter had purchased from the estate of Beedy Beckett [DB 7:185]. He was a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, in 1791 and 1795 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, on a horse, cow and calf, and a shoat in 1796. He was a "Negro" head of a Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342] and 2 in 1810 [DE:161, 364]. iii. Isaac, born about November 1747, twenty-three years and 7 months old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free when he reached the age of twenty-five [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He was head of a Dover Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:41]. Other members of the family were i. John, born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830. Endnotes: 1. 1740 is the last list of tithables for Somerset that included the portion of the county that formed Worcester in 1742.
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State Virginia
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Somerset, Kent, Sussex
Family Name Beckett
Family History Notes 1. Peter1 Beckett, born say 1655, was a "Negro" slave who was taxable with Thomas Driggers from 1671 to 1677 in the Northampton County, Virginia household of John Eyres [Orders 1664-74, fol.114; 1674-79, 75, 191]. Sarah Dawson, a white servant, was another member of Eyre's household. She was born about 1661 since her age was adjudged to be sixteen years when Eyre brought her into Northampton County court on 26 November 1677 [OW 1674-79, 203]. Seven years later in 1684 she was given twenty-one lashes and ordered to serve Eyre another six years for having "three bastard Maletto Children by her said Masters Negro slave Peter." On 30 May 1687 and 28 May 1688 she was presented for bastard bearing and the following year on 29 July 1689 was called "Sarah the wife of Peter Beckett slave to Major John Eyre" when the court ordered one of her children released to her, "Shee findinge sufficient security to save the parish harmeless from the said Childe" [OW 1683-89, 59, 280, 292, 358, 442-3]. On 28 July 1702 she consented to the indenture of their daughter Ann, "daughter of Sarah Beckett," to Mrs. Ann Eyre until the age of eighteen [OW 1698-1710, 96]. Peter was free by 30 November 1703 when "Peter Beckett and Sarah his wife" successfully sued John Morrine for debt in Northampton County court. John Robins brought an action upon the case against him, but neither party appeared when it came for trial on 21 January 1717/8 [OW&c 1698-1710, 176; Orders 1710-6, 55]. Peter and Sarah's descendants were 2 i. ?Peter2, born say 1683. ii. Rebecca1, born say 1692, taxable in the household of John Drighouse in 1726 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 77]. 3 iii. ?William1, born say 1695. iv. Ann, born 10 December 1697, had a child by John Driggers in Northampton County in 1716. v. Jean, born say 1700, common-law wife of Thomas Driggers of Northampton County. vi. Elizabeth, born say 1705, common-law wife of John Driggers/ Drighouse. 2. Peter2 Beckett, born say 1683, was taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred of Somerset County from 1723 to 1740: listed with Devorix Driggers in 1725, with (his son?) William B____et in 1737, with (his son?) Deverix Becket in 1740 [MdHR C-812, List of Taxables, 1723-1740]. He was fined 2 shillings, 6 pence for uttering an oath in Somerset County in 1727. He was special bail for Devorix Driggers on 17 November 1730 when Devorix admitted in Somerset County court that he owed Christopher Glass 500 pounds of tobacco and 650 pounds of beef which he had contracted for in writing on 10 November 1729 [Judicial Record 1727-30, 147; 1730-3, 43-4]. The inventory of his Worcester County estate, taken by Arcada Okey on 10 May 1751, totalled 129 pounds and listed Bridget Doves and John Nienburgh as nearest of kin. The second inventory taken on 23 January 1754 by Joseph and his wife Arcada Okey included debts from William Cornish, Simon Collock, and Nathaniel Morris. One third of the estate went to Peter's widow Mary Beckett and the remainder to his son Beade Beckett and daughters Arcada Oakey and Hannah Beckett. The estate paid Samuel Handser 7 shillings [Prerogative Inventories 48:98-100; 60:89; Accounts 37:65-6; Balance Book 1751-5, 1:127 (MSA 533-1)]. Peter was the father of i. ?William2, born say 1716. ii. Arcada, married Joseph Okey. iii. Hannah. iv. ?Deverix, born say 1723, taxable in Somerset county in 1740, probably named for Deverix Driggers. v. ?Solomon, taxable in Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1743 to 1762 [Kent County Assessments, 1743-67, frames 10, 109, 125, 154, 174, 201, 204, 216, 247, 270, 349]. 4 vi. Bede1, born say 1740. 3. William1 Beckett, born say 1695, was taxable in Kent County, Delaware, from 1726 to 1756: listed in Little Creek Hundred, charged with the tax of _____ Drigers in 1727, called William Beckett Sen. from 1749 to 1756 when he was listed in Dover Hundred near Nehemiah Hansor and Samuel Hanson [Kent County Levy List 1743-67]. William was called a yeoman when he purchased two lots of ground within the town of Dover for 12 pounds by Kent County, Delaware deed on 2 April 1754 [DB O:256]. He left a 31 January 1757 Kent County will (signing the letter "B"), proved 7 May 1757, leaving Mary Concelor a bed, furniture and a sorrel mare; his daughter Comfort a horse; his son Nathan a gun; his son William a shilling; his daughters Sarah and Mary each a mare; and his wife Comfort all his lands. Nehemiah Handzor witnessed the will [WB K-1, 162]. William was probably the father of the illegitimate child Mary Concelor had in Kent County in August 1728 [Delaware Archives RG 3815.031, dockets 1722-32, frames 229, 235]. And he was probably related to a "Mulatto" child Abraham Beckitt who was supported by Richard Wells (of Dover Hundred), Esq., from the county levy in November 1757 and Tabitha Beckett, a poor woman, supported by Lydia Wells from Kent County levy in November 1758 [DSA, RG 3200, Levy Court Minutes 1732-, frames 34, 38; RG 3535, Assessments 1743-67, frames 221, 223]. Comfort and her daughter Mary Beckett sold 50 acres in Dover Hundred, Kent County, on the north side of the Dover River on 31 March 1758 [DB P:65]. Mary Beckett sold 50 acres in Dover Hundred, Kent County, on the north side of the Dover River on 31 March 1758 [DB P:111]. William was the father of 5 i. William3, born say 1720. ii. Comfort, born say 1723. iii. Nathan, born say 1728, taxable in Dover Hundred in 1758 and 1759 [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 213, 240]. iv. Sarah, born say 1734. v. Mary, born say 1736, charged Rike Miller in November 1771 with being the father of her illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805, MS, indictments]. 4. Bede1 Beckett, born about 1738, was a twenty-one-year-old, born in Maryland, who was listed in the 11 May 1759 muster of Captain John Wright's Company in the French and Indian War (abstracted as "Bedy Bullett," in the same list with Samuel and Thomas Hanzer of Sussex County, that included mostly men born in Sussex County [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 278-9]. He married Ann Butler (no race indicated for either) in Sussex County on 21 April 1763 and their son William was born on 12 July 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 274]. Bede, a labourer, purchased 118 acres called Good Luck on the east side of the Green Branch in Sussex County on __ May 1764 for 37 pounds [DB K-11:60]. He was a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, taxable in Broadkiln Hundred in 1774, a Nanticoke Hundred delinquent in 1787 [Delaware Archives, Levy Assessment RG 2535]. He died about 1787 when Peter Beckett was granted administration on his estate [de Valinger, Calendar of Kent County Probate Records 1680-1800, 181]. He was the father of i. William4, born 12 July 1768, called William Butler Beckett when he was taxable in Sussex County in Nanticoke Hundred near Peter Beckett in 1791 and in Little Creek Hundred in 1796 [Levy Assessment List, RG 2535]. ii. ?Bede2, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred adjoining Peter Beckett in 1795. 5. William3 Beckett, born say 1720, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1741 and 1742: in the same list as Samuel Hanson; taxable in Dover Hundred from 1748 to 1769: listed in Samuel Hanson's levy in 1748 (called "William Beckitt Jur"), perhaps deceased in 1769 when he was a Dover Hundred delinquent [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 437, 494, 508; 1768-1784, 26, 32]. In November 1752 he was fined 5 pounds by the Kent County court for keeping a tippling house without a license [RG 3805.002, Court of General Sessions, frame 214]. He was called William Beckett Junr, yeoman, on 13 February 1754 when he purchased 100 acres in the forest of Murderkill Hundred on the north side of Milstons Bridge for 35 pounds [DB O:220]. He may have had a child by one of Samuel Hanson's slaves. On 27 January 1770 Hanson made a deed of manumission by which he freed three slaves named Beckett: i. Charles, born about December 1740, a "Negro" about 30 years and one month old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free by manumission recorded in May 1775 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He was a "Negro" head of a Dover Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:97]. ii. Peter2, born about June 1744, a "Negro" about 25 years and seven months old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in the Revolutionary War and received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,483; 54,830; 54,938; 55,184; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He married Betty Drigas (Driggers) on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. He was administrator of the Sussex County estate of Bede Beckett in 1787 [de Valinger, Calendar of Kent County Probate Records 1680-1800, 181]. On 3 October 1792 he and his wife Elizabeth of Broadkiln Hundred sold for 120 pounds 118 acres in Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, which Peter had purchased from the estate of Beedy Beckett [DB 7:185]. He was a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, in 1791 and 1795 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, on a horse, cow and calf, and a shoat in 1796. He was a "Negro" head of a Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342] and 2 in 1810 [DE:161, 364]. iii. Isaac, born about November 1747, twenty-three years and 7 months old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free when he reached the age of twenty-five [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He was head of a Dover Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:41]. Other members of the family were i. John, born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830. Endnotes: 1. 1740 is the last list of tithables for Somerset that included the portion of the county that formed Worcester in 1742.
Additional Notes
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Family Name Blake
Family History Notes 1. George1 Blake, born say 1685, and (his wife) Hannah were named in the 5 December 1707 Northampton County will of John Robins by which he gave his five sons his part of Chincoteague Island "wth my man and woman, George Blake and Hannah" (who were to continue looking after his cattle, horses and hogs on the island) and gave his son Edward Robins a "Mallatto boy Charles son of Hannah" who was also on his part of the island [DW&c 1708-17, 23-31]. George (?10) and Hannah Blake (?3) were valued in the 14 November 1732 Somerset County inventory of the estate of John Robins's son Thomas Robins with (their children?) Comfort, Samuel, Sarah and Charles Blake [Prerogative Court Inventories 1730-2, 16:717]. Hannah was a spinster charged in Somerset County court with having an illegitimate child in All Hallows Parish on 10 January 1732 but excused because she was a "black woman" and thus not subject to punishment for fornication [Judicial Record 1733-5, 244; 1735-7, 18-19]. A presentment against her by the churchwardens was dismissed in Accomack County on 22 February 1742/3. She was apparently the mother of seven-year-old Harman Blake who was bound out that day to Edward Robins and John Kendall to be a tanner [Orders 1737-44, 467-8]. George and Hannah were probably the ancestors of i. Charles, "given" to Edward Robins in December 1707, valued at ?3 in 1732, perhaps the Charles Blake who was added to the list of tithables for Accomack County on 27 August 1766 with his wife Jenny "(negro)" and 200 acres of land [Orders 1765-7, 180]. ii. Comfort1, valued at ?5.10 in 1732. iii. Samuel, valued at ?10 in 1732, purchased 54 acres in Worcester County called Partnership and the house where he was then living from George Blake on 2 March 1763, and on 15 May 1772 he and his wife Mary Blake sold the land to Daniel Miflin [DB E:463-4; I:93-4]. iv. Sarah1, valued at ?1.10 in 1732. 2 v. George2, born say 1734. vi. Harman, born about 1736, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:736], probably named for the Harman family. He owed ?6 to the Worcester County estate of Thomas Robins on 22 December 1770 [Prerogative Inventories 104:56]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Hannah, fined 50 shillings by the Accomack County court on 26 May 1747 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1744-53]. viii. Levin1, bound by the Accomack County court to Jabez Kendall to be a shop joiner on 28 July 1761 [Orders 1753-63, 404]. He sold lot number 60 in the town of Snow Hill by Worcester County deed of 6 September 1782 [DB K:468-9] and was head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:790] and 11 "other free" in 1810 [MD:614]. He purchased 20 acres called Amity and Amity's Addition in Worcester County for 60 pounds on 5 April 1802 [DB U:650-1]. ix. Mary, presented by the churchwardens of Accomack County but dismissed on agreement on 25 September 1765 [Orders 1764-5, 535]. x. William, a "Mulatto" bound by the Accomack County court to Arthur Rorsley to be a shoemaker on 28 April 1761 [Orders 1753-63, 395], a "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:732]. xi. John, born say 1760, purchased his wife Hesther and son Solomon at the sheriff's sale of William Bell's Accomack County estate on 27 September 1790 with Daniel Miflin as witness [DB 1788-93, 408]. 2. George2 Blake, born say 1734, surveyed 1,357 acres in Worcester County between the Pocomoke River and the seaside, near Gibbs Ferry and Littleton Creek, on 29 September 1759 and was called a "Negro," "Malatto," "Negro or Molatter" when he and his wife Esther sold the land, called Partnership, in parcels of about 50 acres each. He sold 54 acres to Samuel Blake and the house where Samuel was then living on 2 March 1763. And he sold the last 100 acres, called Elbon Ridge and Blakes Lott, to Bowdoin Robins for 40 pounds on 14 September 1764 [DB E:294-5, 302, 463-4, 471; F:236-8, 265]. He may have been the George Blake, Senr, "free Molatto," who bound himself as a servant for one year to Mr. John Rock by Worcester County deed of 7 December 1797 for ?15 [S:107]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:732]. He may have been the father of i. George3, taxable in Mattopony Hundred Worcester County in 1783, "Capt. John Selby surety" [MSA S1161-11-8, p.2]. He was a "free Mulatto" who bound himself as a servant to Joseph Delastatius in Worcester County for eighteen months for 20 pounds on 3 September 1797 [DB S:14-5]. ii. Charles2, head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:767]. He purchased a "negro man" named Vebo from Affry D. Johnson for $1 by Worcester County deed of 21 April 1832 [DB AY:71-2]. iii. Esther, head of a Worcester County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. Other members of the Blake family were 3 i. Betty, born say 1750. ii. Jacob, born about 1756, applied for a pension in Worcester County court on 20 June 1818 and 28 February 1821 for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted at Snowhill in 1780 and was discharged at Annapolis. His household consisted of his wife who was seventy years old, a son who was sixteen, a nineteen-year-old daughter, another daughter who was blind, and four grandchildren. His property was valued at $40 [NARA, S.34654, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "free colored" in 1820. iii. Edward1, a "molatto" who enlisted and served in the Revolutionary War [Archives of Maryland 47:460]. iv. Oliver, drafted into service in the 3d Regiment from Worcester County, Maryland, on 7 May 1781 for 3 years, delinquent on 10 December [Archives of Maryland 18:425, 473; NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 450 of 587, http://ancestry.com]. He was taxable in Mattopony Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 with Michael Tarr as his surety [MSA S1161-11-8, 1/4/5/54, http://www.msa.maryland.gov/msa/stagser/s1400/s1437/html/1437wo.html]. v. William, head of a Baltimore Town household of 2 "other free" in 1790. vi. Henry, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:731]. vii. James2, Senior, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169]. viii. James3, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:729]. ix. James4, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:740] and 4 in 1810 [MD:578] and 5 "free colored" in 1830. x. James5, taxable in Mattopony Hundred, Worcester County in 1783, John Redding surety [MSA S1161-11-8, p.1]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:731] and 8 in 1810 [MD:629]. xi. Peter, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. xii. Henry, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. xiii. Sally2, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. xiv. James6, Junior, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:169] and 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:910]. xv. David, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:152] and 8 in 1810 [MD:251]. xvi. Edward2, born 1776-1794, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820. xvii. Benjamin, born about 1782, registered in Talbot County on 9 September 1822: a negro man, about 40 years of age, 5 feet 10 1/2 Inch high, born Free and raised in Talbot County [Certificates of Freedom 1815-28, 168]. xviii. Standley, born about 1770, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:728], obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 5 August 1806: Copper colour, born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 36 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 1]. He was probably related to the Standley family of Dorchester County. xix. Hannah2, born April 1771, set free by Daniel Miflin in Worcester County on 16 June 1776 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61], head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:744]. xx. Rachel, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:731]. 4 xxi. Mary, born in April 1769. xxii. Archibald, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169]. xxiii. James7, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 6 June 1807: blackish Colour, long hair, born free, aged about thirty nine [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 3]. xxiv. Lucinda, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830. xxv. Sarah3, wife of Salady Stanley. 4. Betty Blake, born say 1750, was set free with her children Susey, John and Comfort Blake by Daniel Miflin in Worcester County on 16 June 1776 [DB I:640 and Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61]. She was the mother of i. Susey. ii. John, testified in a Somerset County case against free Negro Jacob, alias Jacob Purnell, who was charged with stealing five hogs belonging to Thomas Martin. On 4 March 1806 John testified that he was living at Jacob's house for about a month and saw Jacob and Robert J. H. Handy's slave Moses kill the hogs in Jacob's stables, salt them and bury part of them in a barrel in the garden [DB Y:45, 47]. Jacob, a "free Negrow," bound himself as a servant to Benjamin Purnell, Jr., by Worcester County deed of 2 July 1779 [DB K:187]. Jacob Purnell was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:604]. On 28 April 1835 John Blake, called a "Colourd man," was about seventy-six years old, when he testified in Philadelphia for the pension application of Daniel Williams. He stated that he was born in Accomack County and lived near and was well acquainted with Daniel Williams, a "Colourd" man who was drafted into the army to drive teams. John had resided in Philadelphia about fifteen years past, where he again met Williams and had frequently seen him engaged in driving the team [NARA, R.11569, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/28467470]. iii. Comfort2, born in December 1776 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61]. 4. Mary Blake, born in April 1769, was set free by Daniel Miflin in Worcester County on 16 June 1776 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61], a "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:724]. She made a Worcester County bond, with John Gunn as surety, to keep the state of Maryland harmless from the illegitimate child named Levin which she bore on 10 January 1783 [DB O:326]. She had a child named Peggy by Levin Cambridge in November 1790 [DB P:301]. She was the mother of i. Levin2, born 10 January 1783. ii. Peggy, born in November 1790. Members of the Blake family in Delaware were i. James1 "& Son," head of a New Castle County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:271]. ii. Abram, perhaps the unnamed son counted in James Blake's New Castle County household in 1800, head of a New Castle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:231] and 6 "free colored" in Mill Creek Hundred, New Castle County, in 1820 [DE:127]. iii. Edward2, born 1776-1794, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301] and 8 "free colored" in Appoquinimink Hundred in 1820 [MD:149]. iv. John, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35] and 5 "free colored" in Wilmington Borough, New Castle County in 1820 [DE:185]. v. Rosanna, born before 1776, head of a Wilmington, New Castle County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:202].
All Fields in This Record
State Virginia
County (Primary) Accomack
Other Counties Worcester, Somerset
Family Name Blake
Family History Notes 1. George1 Blake, born say 1685, and (his wife) Hannah were named in the 5 December 1707 Northampton County will of John Robins by which he gave his five sons his part of Chincoteague Island "wth my man and woman, George Blake and Hannah" (who were to continue looking after his cattle, horses and hogs on the island) and gave his son Edward Robins a "Mallatto boy Charles son of Hannah" who was also on his part of the island [DW&c 1708-17, 23-31]. George (?10) and Hannah Blake (?3) were valued in the 14 November 1732 Somerset County inventory of the estate of John Robins's son Thomas Robins with (their children?) Comfort, Samuel, Sarah and Charles Blake [Prerogative Court Inventories 1730-2, 16:717]. Hannah was a spinster charged in Somerset County court with having an illegitimate child in All Hallows Parish on 10 January 1732 but excused because she was a "black woman" and thus not subject to punishment for fornication [Judicial Record 1733-5, 244; 1735-7, 18-19]. A presentment against her by the churchwardens was dismissed in Accomack County on 22 February 1742/3. She was apparently the mother of seven-year-old Harman Blake who was bound out that day to Edward Robins and John Kendall to be a tanner [Orders 1737-44, 467-8]. George and Hannah were probably the ancestors of i. Charles, "given" to Edward Robins in December 1707, valued at ?3 in 1732, perhaps the Charles Blake who was added to the list of tithables for Accomack County on 27 August 1766 with his wife Jenny "(negro)" and 200 acres of land [Orders 1765-7, 180]. ii. Comfort1, valued at ?5.10 in 1732. iii. Samuel, valued at ?10 in 1732, purchased 54 acres in Worcester County called Partnership and the house where he was then living from George Blake on 2 March 1763, and on 15 May 1772 he and his wife Mary Blake sold the land to Daniel Miflin [DB E:463-4; I:93-4]. iv. Sarah1, valued at ?1.10 in 1732. 2 v. George2, born say 1734. vi. Harman, born about 1736, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:736], probably named for the Harman family. He owed ?6 to the Worcester County estate of Thomas Robins on 22 December 1770 [Prerogative Inventories 104:56]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Hannah, fined 50 shillings by the Accomack County court on 26 May 1747 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1744-53]. viii. Levin1, bound by the Accomack County court to Jabez Kendall to be a shop joiner on 28 July 1761 [Orders 1753-63, 404]. He sold lot number 60 in the town of Snow Hill by Worcester County deed of 6 September 1782 [DB K:468-9] and was head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:790] and 11 "other free" in 1810 [MD:614]. He purchased 20 acres called Amity and Amity's Addition in Worcester County for 60 pounds on 5 April 1802 [DB U:650-1]. ix. Mary, presented by the churchwardens of Accomack County but dismissed on agreement on 25 September 1765 [Orders 1764-5, 535]. x. William, a "Mulatto" bound by the Accomack County court to Arthur Rorsley to be a shoemaker on 28 April 1761 [Orders 1753-63, 395], a "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:732]. xi. John, born say 1760, purchased his wife Hesther and son Solomon at the sheriff's sale of William Bell's Accomack County estate on 27 September 1790 with Daniel Miflin as witness [DB 1788-93, 408]. 2. George2 Blake, born say 1734, surveyed 1,357 acres in Worcester County between the Pocomoke River and the seaside, near Gibbs Ferry and Littleton Creek, on 29 September 1759 and was called a "Negro," "Malatto," "Negro or Molatter" when he and his wife Esther sold the land, called Partnership, in parcels of about 50 acres each. He sold 54 acres to Samuel Blake and the house where Samuel was then living on 2 March 1763. And he sold the last 100 acres, called Elbon Ridge and Blakes Lott, to Bowdoin Robins for 40 pounds on 14 September 1764 [DB E:294-5, 302, 463-4, 471; F:236-8, 265]. He may have been the George Blake, Senr, "free Molatto," who bound himself as a servant for one year to Mr. John Rock by Worcester County deed of 7 December 1797 for ?15 [S:107]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:732]. He may have been the father of i. George3, taxable in Mattopony Hundred Worcester County in 1783, "Capt. John Selby surety" [MSA S1161-11-8, p.2]. He was a "free Mulatto" who bound himself as a servant to Joseph Delastatius in Worcester County for eighteen months for 20 pounds on 3 September 1797 [DB S:14-5]. ii. Charles2, head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:767]. He purchased a "negro man" named Vebo from Affry D. Johnson for $1 by Worcester County deed of 21 April 1832 [DB AY:71-2]. iii. Esther, head of a Worcester County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. Other members of the Blake family were 3 i. Betty, born say 1750. ii. Jacob, born about 1756, applied for a pension in Worcester County court on 20 June 1818 and 28 February 1821 for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted at Snowhill in 1780 and was discharged at Annapolis. His household consisted of his wife who was seventy years old, a son who was sixteen, a nineteen-year-old daughter, another daughter who was blind, and four grandchildren. His property was valued at $40 [NARA, S.34654, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "free colored" in 1820. iii. Edward1, a "molatto" who enlisted and served in the Revolutionary War [Archives of Maryland 47:460]. iv. Oliver, drafted into service in the 3d Regiment from Worcester County, Maryland, on 7 May 1781 for 3 years, delinquent on 10 December [Archives of Maryland 18:425, 473; NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 450 of 587, http://ancestry.com]. He was taxable in Mattopony Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 with Michael Tarr as his surety [MSA S1161-11-8, 1/4/5/54, http://www.msa.maryland.gov/msa/stagser/s1400/s1437/html/1437wo.html]. v. William, head of a Baltimore Town household of 2 "other free" in 1790. vi. Henry, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:731]. vii. James2, Senior, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169]. viii. James3, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:729]. ix. James4, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:740] and 4 in 1810 [MD:578] and 5 "free colored" in 1830. x. James5, taxable in Mattopony Hundred, Worcester County in 1783, John Redding surety [MSA S1161-11-8, p.1]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:731] and 8 in 1810 [MD:629]. xi. Peter, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. xii. Henry, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. xiii. Sally2, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. xiv. James6, Junior, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:169] and 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:910]. xv. David, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:152] and 8 in 1810 [MD:251]. xvi. Edward2, born 1776-1794, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820. xvii. Benjamin, born about 1782, registered in Talbot County on 9 September 1822: a negro man, about 40 years of age, 5 feet 10 1/2 Inch high, born Free and raised in Talbot County [Certificates of Freedom 1815-28, 168]. xviii. Standley, born about 1770, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:728], obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 5 August 1806: Copper colour, born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 36 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 1]. He was probably related to the Standley family of Dorchester County. xix. Hannah2, born April 1771, set free by Daniel Miflin in Worcester County on 16 June 1776 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61], head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:744]. xx. Rachel, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:731]. 4 xxi. Mary, born in April 1769. xxii. Archibald, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169]. xxiii. James7, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 6 June 1807: blackish Colour, long hair, born free, aged about thirty nine [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 3]. xxiv. Lucinda, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830. xxv. Sarah3, wife of Salady Stanley. 4. Betty Blake, born say 1750, was set free with her children Susey, John and Comfort Blake by Daniel Miflin in Worcester County on 16 June 1776 [DB I:640 and Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61]. She was the mother of i. Susey. ii. John, testified in a Somerset County case against free Negro Jacob, alias Jacob Purnell, who was charged with stealing five hogs belonging to Thomas Martin. On 4 March 1806 John testified that he was living at Jacob's house for about a month and saw Jacob and Robert J. H. Handy's slave Moses kill the hogs in Jacob's stables, salt them and bury part of them in a barrel in the garden [DB Y:45, 47]. Jacob, a "free Negrow," bound himself as a servant to Benjamin Purnell, Jr., by Worcester County deed of 2 July 1779 [DB K:187]. Jacob Purnell was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:604]. On 28 April 1835 John Blake, called a "Colourd man," was about seventy-six years old, when he testified in Philadelphia for the pension application of Daniel Williams. He stated that he was born in Accomack County and lived near and was well acquainted with Daniel Williams, a "Colourd" man who was drafted into the army to drive teams. John had resided in Philadelphia about fifteen years past, where he again met Williams and had frequently seen him engaged in driving the team [NARA, R.11569, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/28467470]. iii. Comfort2, born in December 1776 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61]. 4. Mary Blake, born in April 1769, was set free by Daniel Miflin in Worcester County on 16 June 1776 [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 61], a "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:724]. She made a Worcester County bond, with John Gunn as surety, to keep the state of Maryland harmless from the illegitimate child named Levin which she bore on 10 January 1783 [DB O:326]. She had a child named Peggy by Levin Cambridge in November 1790 [DB P:301]. She was the mother of i. Levin2, born 10 January 1783. ii. Peggy, born in November 1790. Members of the Blake family in Delaware were i. James1 "& Son," head of a New Castle County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:271]. ii. Abram, perhaps the unnamed son counted in James Blake's New Castle County household in 1800, head of a New Castle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:231] and 6 "free colored" in Mill Creek Hundred, New Castle County, in 1820 [DE:127]. iii. Edward2, born 1776-1794, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301] and 8 "free colored" in Appoquinimink Hundred in 1820 [MD:149]. iv. John, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35] and 5 "free colored" in Wilmington Borough, New Castle County in 1820 [DE:185]. v. Rosanna, born before 1776, head of a Wilmington, New Castle County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:202].
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Family Name Bond
Family History Notes Martha Bond, born say 1725, the servant of Francis Pickering of St. Michael's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate "Mulatto" child [Judgment Record 1745-6, 245]. She may have been the mother of i. John, a "free mulatto" living on Talbot Island, Tuckahoe & Kings Creek, Talbot Island, Talbot County in 1783 [MSA S1161-10-3, p.11]. ii. Rachel, head of a Caroline County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Bond
Family History Notes Martha Bond, born say 1725, the servant of Francis Pickering of St. Michael's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate "Mulatto" child [Judgment Record 1745-6, 245]. She may have been the mother of i. John, a "free mulatto" living on Talbot Island, Tuckahoe & Kings Creek, Talbot Island, Talbot County in 1783 [MSA S1161-10-3, p.11]. ii. Rachel, head of a Caroline County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.
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Family Name Buckley
Family History Notes Elizabeth Buckley, born say 1732, was a spinster white woman living in Talbot County in June 1752 when the court convicted her of having a "Mulatter" child. The court sold her for seven years and her child for thirty-one [Judgment Record 1751-5, n.p.]. She may have been the mother of i. William, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:514].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Buckley
Family History Notes Elizabeth Buckley, born say 1732, was a spinster white woman living in Talbot County in June 1752 when the court convicted her of having a "Mulatter" child. The court sold her for seven years and her child for thirty-one [Judgment Record 1751-5, n.p.]. She may have been the mother of i. William, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:514].
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Family Name Buley
Family History Notes Stephen Buley, born say 1733, was head of a household of a black male 40-50 years old in the 1776 census for Straights Hundred of Dorchester County with a black woman 30-40, a black boy 10-16, 3 black boys under 10, a black girl 10-16 and a black girl under 10 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:682]. He was probably the husband of Fortune Beuley, born about 1746, whose son Jesse obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 25 September 1816. They were probably the parents of i. Job, born about 1755, enlisted in the 3d Maryland Regiment on 8 April 1782: residence Cambridge, age 27 years, 5'7-1/2" high, stout, black complexion, form of hair: wool [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/17229501; M246, roll 34, frame 433 of 587]. ii. George, born about 1761, a soldier who enlisted in the Revolution in Dorchester County, appeared in Dorchester County court at the age of 72 years on 9 April 1833 and applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Prince George's County about 1761 and was living in Dorchester County when he entered the service at East New Market for 9 months on 10 March 1781. His widow Grace Bewley, aged 59, "a free Colored woman," was residing in Baltimore on 10 July 1855 when she applied for a widow's pension. She stated that they were married on 18 June 1824 by a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Cambridge, Dorchester County, and her maiden name was Grace Cromwell. Her husband died on 15 August 1836. Her brother Shadrack Cromwell, aged 80, stated that she died on 1 March 1872 [NARA, W.27576, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12028637]. iii. Jesse, born about 1766, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:691]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 25 September 1816: of a chesnut colour ... raised in Dorchester County and was born free and is the son of Fortune Beuley who was also born free, aged about 50 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes, 1806-64, 34]. iv. Henry, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:663]. Another member of the family was i. Ralph, born about 1794, a 48-year-old farmer from Somerset County who emigrated to Liberia aboard the Lafayette in 1832 with Nelly (40), Charlotte (22), Ann (14), Polly Ellen (10), Isaac James (6) and John Thomas Buly [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670387].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Somerset
Family Name Buley
Family History Notes Stephen Buley, born say 1733, was head of a household of a black male 40-50 years old in the 1776 census for Straights Hundred of Dorchester County with a black woman 30-40, a black boy 10-16, 3 black boys under 10, a black girl 10-16 and a black girl under 10 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:682]. He was probably the husband of Fortune Beuley, born about 1746, whose son Jesse obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 25 September 1816. They were probably the parents of i. Job, born about 1755, enlisted in the 3d Maryland Regiment on 8 April 1782: residence Cambridge, age 27 years, 5'7-1/2" high, stout, black complexion, form of hair: wool [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/17229501; M246, roll 34, frame 433 of 587]. ii. George, born about 1761, a soldier who enlisted in the Revolution in Dorchester County, appeared in Dorchester County court at the age of 72 years on 9 April 1833 and applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Prince George's County about 1761 and was living in Dorchester County when he entered the service at East New Market for 9 months on 10 March 1781. His widow Grace Bewley, aged 59, "a free Colored woman," was residing in Baltimore on 10 July 1855 when she applied for a widow's pension. She stated that they were married on 18 June 1824 by a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Cambridge, Dorchester County, and her maiden name was Grace Cromwell. Her husband died on 15 August 1836. Her brother Shadrack Cromwell, aged 80, stated that she died on 1 March 1872 [NARA, W.27576, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12028637]. iii. Jesse, born about 1766, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:691]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 25 September 1816: of a chesnut colour ... raised in Dorchester County and was born free and is the son of Fortune Beuley who was also born free, aged about 50 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes, 1806-64, 34]. iv. Henry, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:663]. Another member of the family was i. Ralph, born about 1794, a 48-year-old farmer from Somerset County who emigrated to Liberia aboard the Lafayette in 1832 with Nelly (40), Charlotte (22), Ann (14), Polly Ellen (10), Isaac James (6) and John Thomas Buly [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670387].
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Family Name Burton
Family History Notes Ann Barton, born say 1708, was living at the house of James Lindow in Manokin Hundred of Somerset Parish on 11 June 1725 when she had a "molatto" child. The court sold her child to Lindow for 510 pounds of tobacco, and Lindow posted bond of 20 pounds sterling to return her to the parish to be sold for seven years. She had a child by a (white?) man named John Rogers in October 1729. The court sold her child to Edward Rownd [Judicial Record 1725-7, 50-1; 1727-30, 225; 1733-5, 78, 80]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Luke, born say 1745. 2. Luke Burton, born say 1745, and his wife, Patience, registered the 10 May 1769 birth of their "mulatto" son, James, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 98]. They were the parents of i. James, born 10 May 1769. ii. ?Joseph, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:161]. iii. ?Peter, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:414]. iv. ?William, "Coloured" head of a New Castle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:231].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties New Castle, Sussex
Family Name Burton
Family History Notes Ann Barton, born say 1708, was living at the house of James Lindow in Manokin Hundred of Somerset Parish on 11 June 1725 when she had a "molatto" child. The court sold her child to Lindow for 510 pounds of tobacco, and Lindow posted bond of 20 pounds sterling to return her to the parish to be sold for seven years. She had a child by a (white?) man named John Rogers in October 1729. The court sold her child to Edward Rownd [Judicial Record 1725-7, 50-1; 1727-30, 225; 1733-5, 78, 80]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Luke, born say 1745. 2. Luke Burton, born say 1745, and his wife, Patience, registered the 10 May 1769 birth of their "mulatto" son, James, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 98]. They were the parents of i. James, born 10 May 1769. ii. ?Joseph, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:161]. iii. ?Peter, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:414]. iv. ?William, "Coloured" head of a New Castle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:231].
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Family Name Butcher
Family History Notes 1. Robert1 Butcher, born say 1670, was called "Robert Buchery negroe" of Great Choptank Hundred on 2 September 1690 when the Dorchester County, Maryland court ordered him to pay a fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for begetting an illegitimate child by Elizabeth Cobham, an indentured servant of Andrew Gray. The court also ordered him to pay Gray 800 pounds of tobacco for the nursing of the child. Andrew Gray, Jr., and Philip Pitt were his securities to pay for the tuition and bringing up of the child. Elizabeth Cobham received 25 lashes. In February 1691/2 he was accused of stealing nine deer skins, three new match coats and other items valued at 900 pounds of tobacco from Thomas Wells but was found not guilty. He admitted in February 1792/3 that he owed John Tyley of Talbot County for eight well-dressed deer skins [Judgment Record 1690-2, 176, 157, 156, 93, 87]. He recorded his earmark in adjoining Kent County, Delaware, on 13 February 1692/3 [de Valinger, Court Records of Kent County, Delaware, 1680-1705, 89]. He was sued in Kent County by Hugh Durborow on 11 August 1713. In August 1714 he testified that James Dean had counseled him to kill Timothy Hanson and burn his house. In November 1718 he confessed to the charge of battery and was ordered to be flayed and pay a fifteen shilling fine. He was sued by Griffin Jones about 1723 and by John Bland in August 1723 [General Court Records 1712-6, n.p.; 1718-22, 20; 1722-3, n.p.; 1722-5, 35]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1726, and his name was crossed off the Little Creek Hundred list in 1727 when he was listed with Robert Whud (Wood), Julius Caesar, Thomas Consellor, William Beckett, Winslow Driggers, Jacob Miller, Richard Poolin, and Daniel Francisco [RG 3535, Levy Assessment List, 1726-43, frames 341, 346]. He called himself a "yeoman" in his 26 July 1722 Kent County will which was proved 14 February 1731. He left his son Robert a shilling, left Phillis Asco (no relationship stated) a cow, calf, pewter plates, furniture and one of his three gold rings, and divided the remainder of his estate between his wife Susannah and son-in-law Richard Pulling [DB H-1, fol. 23-24]. His children were 2 i. ?Hannah, born say 1693. 3 ii. Robert2, born say 1695. iii. the unnamed wife of Richard Pulling. 2. Hannah Butcher, born say 1693, was convicted of felony by the Kent County Court of Quarter Sessions on 10 August 1714. She was publicly whipped, made to wear a Roman T, and ordered to pay the owner Timothy Hanson fourfold the 10 shillings value of the goods [Dockets 1680-1725, General Court Records 1712-16, n.p.]. She may have been the mother of 4 i. Susannah, born say 1722. ii. Elizabeth, born say 1725, indicted by the Kent County court in May 1743 for having an illegitimate female child which she charged to William Gonselah (Consellor). In November 1748 she charged George Hilton of Duck Creek Hundred, labourer, with being the father of another illegitimate child. Sarah Butcher was a witness. Perhaps this or a second case against Hilton was the one he submitted to in November 1752 [DSA, RG 3805, MS case papers, May 1743 indictments, November 1748 indictments; Dockets, 1739-79, frames 172, 214, 224]. 3. Robert2 Butcher, born say 1695, was called "Robert Butcher, Junr." in Kent County, Delaware Court on 11 August 1713 when he and Thomas Gonsoaly (Consellor) were fined 15 shillings for being "Deficients on the Highways." He was called "Robert Butcher ye younger" on 15 May 1716 when the Kent County court of Quarter Sessions convicted him of having an illegitimate child by Susanna Stephens [General Court Records 1712-6, n.p.]. His suit against John Harding was dismissed in May 1727 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1722-1732, frame 154]. He was called "Robert Bucher Junr." when he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1729. He was called the administrator of Robert Butcher in May 1732 when Coffey Hilton and Richard Pullin brought separate suits against him in Kent County court. Julius Caesar sued him in court as the administrator of Robert Butcher claiming that he had paid Robert 10 pounds for two steers which had not been delivered. Julius withdrew the case in May 1733, and Robert sued Julius in August 1733 but the case was agreed in November that year [DSA, RG 3515.031, 1722-32, frame 604; 1733-40, frames 3, 60; MS Case papers, May 1733]. His 14 November 1733 Kent County will, proved 6 December 1733, named his wife Sarah (daughter of Thomas Conselah), and left 190 acres of land to his sons, Moses, Benjamin, Robert, Conselah, and Thomas [WB H-1:77]. Sarah was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1740 to 1754. William Rees sued Sarah, Moses, Robert and Consella Butcher for a debt of 65 pounds which they confessed judgment to in March 1747 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, p.29]. His children were i. Moses1, born say 1715, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1740 to 1748, sued by Hugh Durburow for debt in Kent County in May 1742 and in December 1743 he admitted he owed Cornelius Empson 8 pounds [Delaware Archives RG 3815.031, Dockets 1740-4, frames 255, 319, 507]. He died before 12 September 1749 when his brother Robert was appointed administrator of his Kent County estate [WB K-1:2-3]. ii. Benjamin, born say 1718. iii. Robert3, born say 1720, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1745 to 1748, sued Moses Butcher in Kent County court in November 1748 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 499, 549]. He was appointed administrator of the estate of his brother Moses on 12 September 1749. 5 iv. Conselah, born say 1722. v. Thomas1, born say 1723, sued James Maxwell for debt in Kent County court in May 1744 [Docket Volume 1736-85, 43]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1754 to 1756. 4. Susannah Butcher, born say 1722, was a "Molatto free & single woman" who declared in Kent County court on 26 April 1743 that the base born "Molatto" female child which was begotten on her body was by "Negro Jack," who had been the slave of Mrs. Rachel Collins and was then the slave of Mr. James Tybout [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files, April 1743 indictments]. In 1743 Joseph Clayton was allowed 13 shillings for her maintenance [RG 3200, Levy Court minutes]. She may have been the mother of i. Martha, born say 1743, a "free Mulatto," indicted by the Kent County court in August 1771 for having an illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files, August 1771 indictments]. 5. Conselah Butcher, born say 1720, called "Selah" Butcher, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County from 1752 to 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 87, 143, 520, 566; 1768-84, frames 26, 103, 334, 366, 368]. Administration on his Kent County estate was granted to Thomas Butcher, his "next of kin," in 1795 with Jesse Dean surety [WB N-1:117]. He may have been the father of i. Thomas2, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1773 to 1776, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1782, also in Dover Hundred in 1782, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1782 to 1785, taxable in Dover Hundred in 1785, a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1797, taxable on an acre and a log house in 1798 [DSA, RG 3535, 1768-84, frames 184, 222, 262, 299, 336, 370, 491, 522, 533, 539, 541, 570, 582, 619; 1785-97, frames 8, 24, 71, 74, 106, 136, 176, 190, 226, 267, 337; 1797-8, frame 14, 53, 473, 480]. On 14 April 1771 he admitted in Kent County court that he owed Archibald Duglass 129 pounds [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 423]. He witnessed the 11 May 1776 Little Creek Hundred, Kent County will of Samuel Whitman [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 347]. In November 1792 Mary, Cynthia and Elizabeth Ridgeway charged him in Kent County court with assaulting them. Jesse Dean was his surety [DSA, RG 3805.002, Court of General Sessions, 1787-1803, frame 226; MS case papers, November 1792 indictments]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 (called Thomas B. Butcher [DE:20]. Other members of the family were i. Richard Butcherly, born say 1712, held as a servant by John Stevens of Dorchester County contrary to law in August 1733. The court ordered him set free [Judgment Record 1733-4, 48]. ii. Peter Butcherly, born say 1714, servant of Bartholomew Ennalls in November 1733 when the Dorchester County court required Ennalls to pay security of 10 pounds not to transport him outside the province [Judgment Record 1733-4, 178]. iii. John, born say 1720, taxable in the upper part of Duck Creek Hundred from 1741 to 1743. His inventory dated 19 February 1762 named his wife Sarah. iv. Caesar, born say 1740, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1761. v. Robert3, say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1772 to 1781, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1785, and a delinquent Murderkill taxable in 1787, perhaps the Robert Bucher who was a "free" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and a Kent County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:157]. vi. Jacob, born say 1752, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1776 to 1780, died before 23 March 1792 when George Frazer was granted administration on his Kent County estate. He was apparently the father of Susannah Butcher since Frazer wrote a letter saying he was too sick to take the inventory on the appointed day and that "her father owes me nothing" [RG 3545, Probate Records, reel 28, frames 174-177; WB N-1, fol. 15]. vii. James, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1786 to 1789, also listed as a "Free Negro" in Dover Hundred from 1789 to 1794 [DSA, RG 3535, Assessments 1785-97, frames 48, 74, 106, 153, 224, 265, 310]. He was called a "Negro" when Robert Hall and Caleb Sipple were granted administration of on his estate on 11 August 1808 on $500 bond [DSA, RG 3545, Probate Records, frame 179]. viii. Rachel, a "free Negro" taxable on a cow in Dover Hundred but struck off the list in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 410]. ix. Moses2, born say 1758, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1779 to 1787, listed as a "free Negro" starting in 1781, head of a Montgomery County, Pennsylvania household of 5 "other free" in 1790. x. Moses3, born before 1776, a "free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, on 4 acres of land in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 411], head of a household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:37]. xi. William, Sr., born say 1760, enlisted in the Revolution on 24 April 1777 and was listed in the Muster of the Independent Company of Foot raised for the safe guard of the...persons...residing near the Town of Lewis and the Coast of Delaware Bay, commanded by Captain William Pary [NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 322 of 658]. He was a "Mulattoe taxable on 2 horses in Kent County in 1797. xii. Peter, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:10]. xiii. James, born 1776-1794, head of a Duck Creek Hundred household of 5 "free colored" with one woman over 45 years old in 1820 [DE:48]. xiv. Henry, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:199]. xv. John, head of a New Castle County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:108]. xvi. Whittington, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:199]. xvii. Eli, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [DE:28].
All Fields in This Record
State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Butcher
Family History Notes 1. Robert1 Butcher, born say 1670, was called "Robert Buchery negroe" of Great Choptank Hundred on 2 September 1690 when the Dorchester County, Maryland court ordered him to pay a fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for begetting an illegitimate child by Elizabeth Cobham, an indentured servant of Andrew Gray. The court also ordered him to pay Gray 800 pounds of tobacco for the nursing of the child. Andrew Gray, Jr., and Philip Pitt were his securities to pay for the tuition and bringing up of the child. Elizabeth Cobham received 25 lashes. In February 1691/2 he was accused of stealing nine deer skins, three new match coats and other items valued at 900 pounds of tobacco from Thomas Wells but was found not guilty. He admitted in February 1792/3 that he owed John Tyley of Talbot County for eight well-dressed deer skins [Judgment Record 1690-2, 176, 157, 156, 93, 87]. He recorded his earmark in adjoining Kent County, Delaware, on 13 February 1692/3 [de Valinger, Court Records of Kent County, Delaware, 1680-1705, 89]. He was sued in Kent County by Hugh Durborow on 11 August 1713. In August 1714 he testified that James Dean had counseled him to kill Timothy Hanson and burn his house. In November 1718 he confessed to the charge of battery and was ordered to be flayed and pay a fifteen shilling fine. He was sued by Griffin Jones about 1723 and by John Bland in August 1723 [General Court Records 1712-6, n.p.; 1718-22, 20; 1722-3, n.p.; 1722-5, 35]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1726, and his name was crossed off the Little Creek Hundred list in 1727 when he was listed with Robert Whud (Wood), Julius Caesar, Thomas Consellor, William Beckett, Winslow Driggers, Jacob Miller, Richard Poolin, and Daniel Francisco [RG 3535, Levy Assessment List, 1726-43, frames 341, 346]. He called himself a "yeoman" in his 26 July 1722 Kent County will which was proved 14 February 1731. He left his son Robert a shilling, left Phillis Asco (no relationship stated) a cow, calf, pewter plates, furniture and one of his three gold rings, and divided the remainder of his estate between his wife Susannah and son-in-law Richard Pulling [DB H-1, fol. 23-24]. His children were 2 i. ?Hannah, born say 1693. 3 ii. Robert2, born say 1695. iii. the unnamed wife of Richard Pulling. 2. Hannah Butcher, born say 1693, was convicted of felony by the Kent County Court of Quarter Sessions on 10 August 1714. She was publicly whipped, made to wear a Roman T, and ordered to pay the owner Timothy Hanson fourfold the 10 shillings value of the goods [Dockets 1680-1725, General Court Records 1712-16, n.p.]. She may have been the mother of 4 i. Susannah, born say 1722. ii. Elizabeth, born say 1725, indicted by the Kent County court in May 1743 for having an illegitimate female child which she charged to William Gonselah (Consellor). In November 1748 she charged George Hilton of Duck Creek Hundred, labourer, with being the father of another illegitimate child. Sarah Butcher was a witness. Perhaps this or a second case against Hilton was the one he submitted to in November 1752 [DSA, RG 3805, MS case papers, May 1743 indictments, November 1748 indictments; Dockets, 1739-79, frames 172, 214, 224]. 3. Robert2 Butcher, born say 1695, was called "Robert Butcher, Junr." in Kent County, Delaware Court on 11 August 1713 when he and Thomas Gonsoaly (Consellor) were fined 15 shillings for being "Deficients on the Highways." He was called "Robert Butcher ye younger" on 15 May 1716 when the Kent County court of Quarter Sessions convicted him of having an illegitimate child by Susanna Stephens [General Court Records 1712-6, n.p.]. His suit against John Harding was dismissed in May 1727 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1722-1732, frame 154]. He was called "Robert Bucher Junr." when he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1729. He was called the administrator of Robert Butcher in May 1732 when Coffey Hilton and Richard Pullin brought separate suits against him in Kent County court. Julius Caesar sued him in court as the administrator of Robert Butcher claiming that he had paid Robert 10 pounds for two steers which had not been delivered. Julius withdrew the case in May 1733, and Robert sued Julius in August 1733 but the case was agreed in November that year [DSA, RG 3515.031, 1722-32, frame 604; 1733-40, frames 3, 60; MS Case papers, May 1733]. His 14 November 1733 Kent County will, proved 6 December 1733, named his wife Sarah (daughter of Thomas Conselah), and left 190 acres of land to his sons, Moses, Benjamin, Robert, Conselah, and Thomas [WB H-1:77]. Sarah was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1740 to 1754. William Rees sued Sarah, Moses, Robert and Consella Butcher for a debt of 65 pounds which they confessed judgment to in March 1747 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, p.29]. His children were i. Moses1, born say 1715, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1740 to 1748, sued by Hugh Durburow for debt in Kent County in May 1742 and in December 1743 he admitted he owed Cornelius Empson 8 pounds [Delaware Archives RG 3815.031, Dockets 1740-4, frames 255, 319, 507]. He died before 12 September 1749 when his brother Robert was appointed administrator of his Kent County estate [WB K-1:2-3]. ii. Benjamin, born say 1718. iii. Robert3, born say 1720, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1745 to 1748, sued Moses Butcher in Kent County court in November 1748 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 499, 549]. He was appointed administrator of the estate of his brother Moses on 12 September 1749. 5 iv. Conselah, born say 1722. v. Thomas1, born say 1723, sued James Maxwell for debt in Kent County court in May 1744 [Docket Volume 1736-85, 43]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1754 to 1756. 4. Susannah Butcher, born say 1722, was a "Molatto free & single woman" who declared in Kent County court on 26 April 1743 that the base born "Molatto" female child which was begotten on her body was by "Negro Jack," who had been the slave of Mrs. Rachel Collins and was then the slave of Mr. James Tybout [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files, April 1743 indictments]. In 1743 Joseph Clayton was allowed 13 shillings for her maintenance [RG 3200, Levy Court minutes]. She may have been the mother of i. Martha, born say 1743, a "free Mulatto," indicted by the Kent County court in August 1771 for having an illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files, August 1771 indictments]. 5. Conselah Butcher, born say 1720, called "Selah" Butcher, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County from 1752 to 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 87, 143, 520, 566; 1768-84, frames 26, 103, 334, 366, 368]. Administration on his Kent County estate was granted to Thomas Butcher, his "next of kin," in 1795 with Jesse Dean surety [WB N-1:117]. He may have been the father of i. Thomas2, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1773 to 1776, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1782, also in Dover Hundred in 1782, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1782 to 1785, taxable in Dover Hundred in 1785, a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1797, taxable on an acre and a log house in 1798 [DSA, RG 3535, 1768-84, frames 184, 222, 262, 299, 336, 370, 491, 522, 533, 539, 541, 570, 582, 619; 1785-97, frames 8, 24, 71, 74, 106, 136, 176, 190, 226, 267, 337; 1797-8, frame 14, 53, 473, 480]. On 14 April 1771 he admitted in Kent County court that he owed Archibald Duglass 129 pounds [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 423]. He witnessed the 11 May 1776 Little Creek Hundred, Kent County will of Samuel Whitman [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 347]. In November 1792 Mary, Cynthia and Elizabeth Ridgeway charged him in Kent County court with assaulting them. Jesse Dean was his surety [DSA, RG 3805.002, Court of General Sessions, 1787-1803, frame 226; MS case papers, November 1792 indictments]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 (called Thomas B. Butcher [DE:20]. Other members of the family were i. Richard Butcherly, born say 1712, held as a servant by John Stevens of Dorchester County contrary to law in August 1733. The court ordered him set free [Judgment Record 1733-4, 48]. ii. Peter Butcherly, born say 1714, servant of Bartholomew Ennalls in November 1733 when the Dorchester County court required Ennalls to pay security of 10 pounds not to transport him outside the province [Judgment Record 1733-4, 178]. iii. John, born say 1720, taxable in the upper part of Duck Creek Hundred from 1741 to 1743. His inventory dated 19 February 1762 named his wife Sarah. iv. Caesar, born say 1740, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1761. v. Robert3, say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1772 to 1781, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1785, and a delinquent Murderkill taxable in 1787, perhaps the Robert Bucher who was a "free" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and a Kent County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:157]. vi. Jacob, born say 1752, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1776 to 1780, died before 23 March 1792 when George Frazer was granted administration on his Kent County estate. He was apparently the father of Susannah Butcher since Frazer wrote a letter saying he was too sick to take the inventory on the appointed day and that "her father owes me nothing" [RG 3545, Probate Records, reel 28, frames 174-177; WB N-1, fol. 15]. vii. James, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1786 to 1789, also listed as a "Free Negro" in Dover Hundred from 1789 to 1794 [DSA, RG 3535, Assessments 1785-97, frames 48, 74, 106, 153, 224, 265, 310]. He was called a "Negro" when Robert Hall and Caleb Sipple were granted administration of on his estate on 11 August 1808 on $500 bond [DSA, RG 3545, Probate Records, frame 179]. viii. Rachel, a "free Negro" taxable on a cow in Dover Hundred but struck off the list in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 410]. ix. Moses2, born say 1758, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1779 to 1787, listed as a "free Negro" starting in 1781, head of a Montgomery County, Pennsylvania household of 5 "other free" in 1790. x. Moses3, born before 1776, a "free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, on 4 acres of land in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 411], head of a household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:37]. xi. William, Sr., born say 1760, enlisted in the Revolution on 24 April 1777 and was listed in the Muster of the Independent Company of Foot raised for the safe guard of the...persons...residing near the Town of Lewis and the Coast of Delaware Bay, commanded by Captain William Pary [NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 322 of 658]. He was a "Mulattoe taxable on 2 horses in Kent County in 1797. xii. Peter, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:10]. xiii. James, born 1776-1794, head of a Duck Creek Hundred household of 5 "free colored" with one woman over 45 years old in 1820 [DE:48]. xiv. Henry, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:199]. xv. John, head of a New Castle County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:108]. xvi. Whittington, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:199]. xvii. Eli, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [DE:28].
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Family Name Butler
Family History Notes Ann Butler, born say 1670, was the white servant of Samuel Hersey on 15 January 1690 when she admitted in Somerset County court that she had a "Molatta" child by "Emanuel Negro" a slave of William Coulborne. She promised to pay Hersey 1,200 pounds of tobacco for his expenses in raising the child. Emanuel was given 39 lashes on 10 June 1690 when he was convicted of stealing a hog [Judicial Records 1689-90, 36, 57, 60a, 106, 200]. She may have been the ancestor of the members of the Butler family who were taxable in North Carolina by 1751.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Butler
Family History Notes Ann Butler, born say 1670, was the white servant of Samuel Hersey on 15 January 1690 when she admitted in Somerset County court that she had a "Molatta" child by "Emanuel Negro" a slave of William Coulborne. She promised to pay Hersey 1,200 pounds of tobacco for his expenses in raising the child. Emanuel was given 39 lashes on 10 June 1690 when he was convicted of stealing a hog [Judicial Records 1689-90, 36, 57, 60a, 106, 200]. She may have been the ancestor of the members of the Butler family who were taxable in North Carolina by 1751.
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Family Name Calvell/Calwell/Caldwell
Family History Notes 1. Isabella Colvill, born say 1706, the servant of Mr. Daniel Sherwood of St. Michael's Parish, Talbot County, admitted in court in November 1726 that she had a "Mallatto" child by Sherwood's "Negroe" slave Jack on 1 September 1726. The court ordered that she serve her master another six months for his trouble and then be sold for seven years [Judgment Record 1726, 346-7; 1726 (reverse), 87]. She was the mother of 2 i. Martha, born about 1726. 3 ii. Martin Collwell, born say 1745. 2. Martha Calvell, born about 1726, said to have been the "Mullatto" daughter of Elizabeth Calvel but corrected to Esabel Calvel, was sold to Daniel Sherwood until the age of thirty-one in November 1726 [Judgment Record 1726, 326]. She was called "Martha Colvin, a Mallatto woman" in November 1751 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." The court sold her for seven years and her child for 31 years for a total of 650 pounds of tobacco to Joseph Dawson. She was called Martha Calvell in November 1753 when she admitted to the same offense and was ordered to be sold for another seven years after the completion of her service to Joshep Dawson [Criminal Record, 1751-5, n.p.]. Martha Caldwell was head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of i. Lucy Caldwell, born say 1743, a spinster living in Talbot County in August 1763 when she was convicted of having a child by a "Negro." The Court sold her and her child to Cornelius Dailey for 4,400 pounds of tobacco [Criminal Record 1761-7, 212-3]. 3. Martin Collwell, born say 1745, was head of a taxable "free Mullotes" household of two "blacks" in Bay Hundred, Talbot County in August 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland]. He may have been the father of i. Ary, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 September 1809: a black woman ... about 41 years of age, 5 feet & three quarters of an inch high ... free born ... raised in the County. ii. Joseph, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 12 September 1812: a Mullatto man ... about thirty two years of age, five feet Seven and one quarter inches high ... born free and raised in the County. iii. Jeremiah, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 29 January 1811: about 23 years of age, five feet nine inches high ... dark yellow complexion was born free ... raised in the county. iv. Sally, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 21 August 1815: a Black Girl ... Sally Caldwell ... about 20 years of age 5 feet 1/2 inches high ... born free, & raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 17, 18, 40, 124].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Calvell/Calwell/Caldwell
Family History Notes 1. Isabella Colvill, born say 1706, the servant of Mr. Daniel Sherwood of St. Michael's Parish, Talbot County, admitted in court in November 1726 that she had a "Mallatto" child by Sherwood's "Negroe" slave Jack on 1 September 1726. The court ordered that she serve her master another six months for his trouble and then be sold for seven years [Judgment Record 1726, 346-7; 1726 (reverse), 87]. She was the mother of 2 i. Martha, born about 1726. 3 ii. Martin Collwell, born say 1745. 2. Martha Calvell, born about 1726, said to have been the "Mullatto" daughter of Elizabeth Calvel but corrected to Esabel Calvel, was sold to Daniel Sherwood until the age of thirty-one in November 1726 [Judgment Record 1726, 326]. She was called "Martha Colvin, a Mallatto woman" in November 1751 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." The court sold her for seven years and her child for 31 years for a total of 650 pounds of tobacco to Joseph Dawson. She was called Martha Calvell in November 1753 when she admitted to the same offense and was ordered to be sold for another seven years after the completion of her service to Joshep Dawson [Criminal Record, 1751-5, n.p.]. Martha Caldwell was head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of i. Lucy Caldwell, born say 1743, a spinster living in Talbot County in August 1763 when she was convicted of having a child by a "Negro." The Court sold her and her child to Cornelius Dailey for 4,400 pounds of tobacco [Criminal Record 1761-7, 212-3]. 3. Martin Collwell, born say 1745, was head of a taxable "free Mullotes" household of two "blacks" in Bay Hundred, Talbot County in August 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland]. He may have been the father of i. Ary, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 September 1809: a black woman ... about 41 years of age, 5 feet & three quarters of an inch high ... free born ... raised in the County. ii. Joseph, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 12 September 1812: a Mullatto man ... about thirty two years of age, five feet Seven and one quarter inches high ... born free and raised in the County. iii. Jeremiah, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 29 January 1811: about 23 years of age, five feet nine inches high ... dark yellow complexion was born free ... raised in the county. iv. Sally, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 21 August 1815: a Black Girl ... Sally Caldwell ... about 20 years of age 5 feet 1/2 inches high ... born free, & raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 17, 18, 40, 124].
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Family Name Cambridge
Family History Notes Anne Hunt, born say 1694, was the servant of Mr. Robert Nearn/ Nairn, merchant of Coventry Parish, on 2 June 1713 when she admitted in Somerset County court that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she receive thirty lashes and that her master give security to return her to court to be sold for seven years at the completion of her indenture. Her master Robert Nearn purchased her unnamed son for thirty one years [Judicial Record 1711-13, 283-4]. Ann was apparently the mother of 2 i. William Cambridge, born about 1713. 2. William1 Cambridge Hunt, born about 1713, was called William Cambridge when he was taxable in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County household of Robert Nairn in 1727 and 1728: called Will and taxable in James Nairn's Pocomoke household from 1730 to 1743: called William Cambridge in 1730 and 1743, called either "Will" or "Cambridge" in the intervening years [List of Taxables]. He was called William Hunt Cambridge when he was granted a patent of 50 acres in Worcester County called "William's Choice" in 1752 which he expanded to 128 acres in 1754 (called William Cambridge Stuart). He was called "William Cambridge a Molatto" in 1783 when he was taxable in Acquango Hundred, Worcester County, on 128 acres, called "William's Choice enlarged" [MSA S1437, p.2]. He called himself William Cambridge Hunt (making his mark) in his 11 March 1784 Worcester County will, proved 5 January 1787, by which he left his plantation to his wife Esther during her widowhood and then to son Levin, or to son George if Levin died before attaining the age of twenty-one. He also left his daughter Leah a feather bed, furniture and a place and materials to build a house and divided some of his possessions among "all my children" [WB JW 13:109-11]. His widow Esther sold and released "William's Choice" for 30 pounds on 9 March 1798 [DB S:286-7]. Their children were i. Leah, born say 1763. ii. Levin, born say 1765, called himself a "free Mollater" on 25 March 1794 when he and George Cambridge gave bond of 30 pounds to support the illegitimate child Peggy who he had by Mary Blake in Worcester County in November 1790 [DB P:301]. He called himself "Levin Cambridge (alias Hunt)" on 24 April 1795 when he sold (signing) the 128 acres of land he received by his father's will to Charles Godfrey for about 11 pounds and then repurchased the land from Godfrey for the same price on 25 December the same year. He mortgaged the property to James Bowdoin Robins on 4 November 1796 for 50 pounds and then completed the sale to Samuel Handy, Sr., on 6 April 1798 [DB Q:172-3; R:56, 374; S:284]. iii. George, born say 1767, head of a Bracken County, Kentucky household of 3 "free colored" in 1830, in the same county as William Cambridge, born before 1776, who was head of a household of 4 "free colored." iv. ?Charles, "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1789, in Mispillion Hundred in 1797, and head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:76]. He died before 6 May 1806 when his widow Mary gave up her right to administer his estate. The estate was valued at $201 [DSA, RG 3545, Reel 31, frames 521-4]. v. ?Isaac, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301]. vi. ?William2, died about 1806 when the inventory of his estate was recorded in Kent County, Delaware [Inventories 1806-12].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties New Castle, Worcester
Family Name Cambridge
Family History Notes Anne Hunt, born say 1694, was the servant of Mr. Robert Nearn/ Nairn, merchant of Coventry Parish, on 2 June 1713 when she admitted in Somerset County court that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she receive thirty lashes and that her master give security to return her to court to be sold for seven years at the completion of her indenture. Her master Robert Nearn purchased her unnamed son for thirty one years [Judicial Record 1711-13, 283-4]. Ann was apparently the mother of 2 i. William Cambridge, born about 1713. 2. William1 Cambridge Hunt, born about 1713, was called William Cambridge when he was taxable in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County household of Robert Nairn in 1727 and 1728: called Will and taxable in James Nairn's Pocomoke household from 1730 to 1743: called William Cambridge in 1730 and 1743, called either "Will" or "Cambridge" in the intervening years [List of Taxables]. He was called William Hunt Cambridge when he was granted a patent of 50 acres in Worcester County called "William's Choice" in 1752 which he expanded to 128 acres in 1754 (called William Cambridge Stuart). He was called "William Cambridge a Molatto" in 1783 when he was taxable in Acquango Hundred, Worcester County, on 128 acres, called "William's Choice enlarged" [MSA S1437, p.2]. He called himself William Cambridge Hunt (making his mark) in his 11 March 1784 Worcester County will, proved 5 January 1787, by which he left his plantation to his wife Esther during her widowhood and then to son Levin, or to son George if Levin died before attaining the age of twenty-one. He also left his daughter Leah a feather bed, furniture and a place and materials to build a house and divided some of his possessions among "all my children" [WB JW 13:109-11]. His widow Esther sold and released "William's Choice" for 30 pounds on 9 March 1798 [DB S:286-7]. Their children were i. Leah, born say 1763. ii. Levin, born say 1765, called himself a "free Mollater" on 25 March 1794 when he and George Cambridge gave bond of 30 pounds to support the illegitimate child Peggy who he had by Mary Blake in Worcester County in November 1790 [DB P:301]. He called himself "Levin Cambridge (alias Hunt)" on 24 April 1795 when he sold (signing) the 128 acres of land he received by his father's will to Charles Godfrey for about 11 pounds and then repurchased the land from Godfrey for the same price on 25 December the same year. He mortgaged the property to James Bowdoin Robins on 4 November 1796 for 50 pounds and then completed the sale to Samuel Handy, Sr., on 6 April 1798 [DB Q:172-3; R:56, 374; S:284]. iii. George, born say 1767, head of a Bracken County, Kentucky household of 3 "free colored" in 1830, in the same county as William Cambridge, born before 1776, who was head of a household of 4 "free colored." iv. ?Charles, "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1789, in Mispillion Hundred in 1797, and head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:76]. He died before 6 May 1806 when his widow Mary gave up her right to administer his estate. The estate was valued at $201 [DSA, RG 3545, Reel 31, frames 521-4]. v. ?Isaac, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301]. vi. ?William2, died about 1806 when the inventory of his estate was recorded in Kent County, Delaware [Inventories 1806-12].
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Family Name Carney
Family History Notes 1. Rebecca Corney, born say 1671, was the indentured servant of John Baxter in August 1689 when she was convicted by the Charles City County, Virginia Court of having a "Mulatto" bastard" [Orders 1687-95, 225]. She may have been the mother of i. William1, born say 1689. 2. William1 Karney, born say 1689, was taxable in Daniel Robbeson's Murderkill, Kent County, Delaware household in 1734, taxable in his own household in 1736 and 1738, and a taxable free "Malato" in 1748 and 1751. He was not taxable in 1752 ("struck out" by the court) [Kent County Assessments Levy Lists]. He was probably the ancestor of i. Thomas1, born say 1731, taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1752 to 1767, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1768 to 1770, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1778 to 1785: called a "N."(egro) starting in 1781, taxable on personal tax only in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 317, 327, 386, 523, 575; 1768-84, frames 10, 65, 336, 370, 552, 568; 1785-97, frames 6; 1798-9, frame 350], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:15]. He admitted in Kent County court in February 1771 that he owed John Smith 90 pounds [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-1771, frames 372, 390]. ii. William2, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1781 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc. , Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:26]. iii. John, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and 7 "other free" in Sussex County, Delaware, in 1810 [DE:442]. iv. Robert, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24]. 3 v. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1758. vi. Nathan, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24]. vii. Jacob, head of an Appoquinimink, New Castle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:442]. 3. Thomas2 Carney, Jr., born say 1758, a man of color, was about sixty years old on 24 February 1818 when he appeared in Caroline County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He enlisted in the 5th Maryland Regiment in June 1781 and served for three years. He appeared in court again on 7 March 1822 at the age of sixty-three and listed his property which included a pair of cart wheels and shafts, five pigs, a sheep and lamb, three barrels of corn, some household items and a debt of $92.50 to the estate of Risdon Fountain. He was a farmer with a fifty-seven or eight-year-old wife named Grace, a seventeen-year-old daughter Alice, and a fourteen-year-old daughter Rebecca living with him [NARA, S.35203, M804, roll 473, frame 552, https://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and a "negro" head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:190]. He was the father of i. ?Elizabeth, born about 1790, a "molatto woman," obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815. ii. ?Levi, born about 1793, "molatto complexion," obtained a certificate obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815. iii. ?Montgomery, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815. iv. ?Lydia, born about 1801, a "negro woman" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 23 September 1826 [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 77, 186, 215]. v. Alice, born about 1805. vi. Rebecca, born about 1808.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Caroline
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Carney
Family History Notes 1. Rebecca Corney, born say 1671, was the indentured servant of John Baxter in August 1689 when she was convicted by the Charles City County, Virginia Court of having a "Mulatto" bastard" [Orders 1687-95, 225]. She may have been the mother of i. William1, born say 1689. 2. William1 Karney, born say 1689, was taxable in Daniel Robbeson's Murderkill, Kent County, Delaware household in 1734, taxable in his own household in 1736 and 1738, and a taxable free "Malato" in 1748 and 1751. He was not taxable in 1752 ("struck out" by the court) [Kent County Assessments Levy Lists]. He was probably the ancestor of i. Thomas1, born say 1731, taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1752 to 1767, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1768 to 1770, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1778 to 1785: called a "N."(egro) starting in 1781, taxable on personal tax only in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 317, 327, 386, 523, 575; 1768-84, frames 10, 65, 336, 370, 552, 568; 1785-97, frames 6; 1798-9, frame 350], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:15]. He admitted in Kent County court in February 1771 that he owed John Smith 90 pounds [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-1771, frames 372, 390]. ii. William2, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1781 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc. , Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:26]. iii. John, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and 7 "other free" in Sussex County, Delaware, in 1810 [DE:442]. iv. Robert, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24]. 3 v. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1758. vi. Nathan, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24]. vii. Jacob, head of an Appoquinimink, New Castle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:442]. 3. Thomas2 Carney, Jr., born say 1758, a man of color, was about sixty years old on 24 February 1818 when he appeared in Caroline County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He enlisted in the 5th Maryland Regiment in June 1781 and served for three years. He appeared in court again on 7 March 1822 at the age of sixty-three and listed his property which included a pair of cart wheels and shafts, five pigs, a sheep and lamb, three barrels of corn, some household items and a debt of $92.50 to the estate of Risdon Fountain. He was a farmer with a fifty-seven or eight-year-old wife named Grace, a seventeen-year-old daughter Alice, and a fourteen-year-old daughter Rebecca living with him [NARA, S.35203, M804, roll 473, frame 552, https://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and a "negro" head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:190]. He was the father of i. ?Elizabeth, born about 1790, a "molatto woman," obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815. ii. ?Levi, born about 1793, "molatto complexion," obtained a certificate obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815. iii. ?Montgomery, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815. iv. ?Lydia, born about 1801, a "negro woman" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 23 September 1826 [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 77, 186, 215]. v. Alice, born about 1805. vi. Rebecca, born about 1808.
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Family Name Case
Family History Notes Mary Case, born say 1683, was the servant of John West on 3 December 1701 when the churchwardens of Accomack Parish presented her for having a "Mullatto Bastard Child." She was presented by the Accomack County court for having another child on 6 April 1703 [Orders 1697-1703, 122a, 126a, 144]. She was probably the ancestor of i. Elizabeth, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" and one slave in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:130]. ii. Major, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:105]. iii. Bridget, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:17]. iv. George, head of an Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:16]. v. Betty, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692]. vi. James, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692].
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State Virginia
County (Primary) Accomack
Other Counties Dorchester
Family Name Case
Family History Notes Mary Case, born say 1683, was the servant of John West on 3 December 1701 when the churchwardens of Accomack Parish presented her for having a "Mullatto Bastard Child." She was presented by the Accomack County court for having another child on 6 April 1703 [Orders 1697-1703, 122a, 126a, 144]. She was probably the ancestor of i. Elizabeth, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" and one slave in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:130]. ii. Major, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:105]. iii. Bridget, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:17]. iv. George, head of an Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:16]. v. Betty, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692]. vi. James, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692].
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Family Name Clark
Family History Notes 1. Martha Clark, born say 1727, was sold by the Kent County court for seven years on 28 August 1746 for payment of fees and charges for murdering her illegitimate child [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 234]. She was the servant of Robert Buchanan of Kent County, Delaware, in May 1761 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate "Molatto" male child and ordered to serve her master one year for the trouble of his house. The court sold her son, born 4 July 1759, to her master for 7 pounds [RG 3805.002, Quarter Sessions, 1734-79, frame 197]. She may have been the mother of 2 i. Thomas, born 4 July 1759. 2. Thomas Clark, born 4 July 1759, married Elizabeth Morris ("Mustees, free"), on 1 July 1773 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286]. He was a soldier in the Revolution from Sussex County who died about 1819. On 13 August 1833 his children and legal heirs Whittington Clark, Nathaniel Clark, John Clark and Comfort Miller, Elizabeth Rigware and Levina Harmon applied for bounty land for his service. Comfort Miller testified on 22 June 1834 that Thomas died about 1819, leaving a widow who was deceased when his children made their application. Comfort named his surviving children listed above and grandchildren: Nelly Morris, daughter of Mary Morris, deceased, Nancy Cursey(?) and Robert Clark, children of Morris Clark, deceased; Major and Whittenton Johnson, children of Nancy Johnson, deceased; and Rebecca and Miers Miller children of Zepporah Miller, deceased [NARA, B.L.Wt. 2047-100, M804, roll 566, frames 463, 474 of 782]. Perhaps his widow was Comfort Clark who was head of "free colored" household of a woman over fifty-five in 1830. Thomas was the father of i. Whitington, born before 1776, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 9 free colored" in 1820 [DE:222]. ii. Mary Morris, mother of Nelly Morris. iii. Morris, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222], father of Mary Morris, Nancy Cursey(?) and Robert Clark. iv. Nancy Johnson, mother of Major and Whittenton Johnson. v. Zepporah Miller, mother of Rebecca and Miers Miller. vi. Nathaniel, about 1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:206], a "Mulatto" listed in the 1850 Lewis and Rehobeth Hundred, Sussex County census with Unicey (56), children, 73-year-old John Ridgeway and Edward Morris. vii. John. viii. Comfort Miller. ix. Elizabeth Rigware, perhaps the wife of John Ridgeway/ Rigware. x. Levina Harmon, perhaps the Levina Harmon, born about 1804, a "Mulatto"in the 1850 census with Garretson Harmon (44) and children. Other members of the family were i. Miers, born 1776-1794, married Nancy Hanzor, "(Colour'd)" on 26 January 1815 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 325]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Clark
Family History Notes 1. Martha Clark, born say 1727, was sold by the Kent County court for seven years on 28 August 1746 for payment of fees and charges for murdering her illegitimate child [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 234]. She was the servant of Robert Buchanan of Kent County, Delaware, in May 1761 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate "Molatto" male child and ordered to serve her master one year for the trouble of his house. The court sold her son, born 4 July 1759, to her master for 7 pounds [RG 3805.002, Quarter Sessions, 1734-79, frame 197]. She may have been the mother of 2 i. Thomas, born 4 July 1759. 2. Thomas Clark, born 4 July 1759, married Elizabeth Morris ("Mustees, free"), on 1 July 1773 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286]. He was a soldier in the Revolution from Sussex County who died about 1819. On 13 August 1833 his children and legal heirs Whittington Clark, Nathaniel Clark, John Clark and Comfort Miller, Elizabeth Rigware and Levina Harmon applied for bounty land for his service. Comfort Miller testified on 22 June 1834 that Thomas died about 1819, leaving a widow who was deceased when his children made their application. Comfort named his surviving children listed above and grandchildren: Nelly Morris, daughter of Mary Morris, deceased, Nancy Cursey(?) and Robert Clark, children of Morris Clark, deceased; Major and Whittenton Johnson, children of Nancy Johnson, deceased; and Rebecca and Miers Miller children of Zepporah Miller, deceased [NARA, B.L.Wt. 2047-100, M804, roll 566, frames 463, 474 of 782]. Perhaps his widow was Comfort Clark who was head of "free colored" household of a woman over fifty-five in 1830. Thomas was the father of i. Whitington, born before 1776, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 9 free colored" in 1820 [DE:222]. ii. Mary Morris, mother of Nelly Morris. iii. Morris, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222], father of Mary Morris, Nancy Cursey(?) and Robert Clark. iv. Nancy Johnson, mother of Major and Whittenton Johnson. v. Zepporah Miller, mother of Rebecca and Miers Miller. vi. Nathaniel, about 1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:206], a "Mulatto" listed in the 1850 Lewis and Rehobeth Hundred, Sussex County census with Unicey (56), children, 73-year-old John Ridgeway and Edward Morris. vii. John. viii. Comfort Miller. ix. Elizabeth Rigware, perhaps the wife of John Ridgeway/ Rigware. x. Levina Harmon, perhaps the Levina Harmon, born about 1804, a "Mulatto"in the 1850 census with Garretson Harmon (44) and children. Other members of the family were i. Miers, born 1776-1794, married Nancy Hanzor, "(Colour'd)" on 26 January 1815 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 325]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222].
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Family Name Collick/Kollock
Family History Notes 1 i. Samuel, born say 1718. ii. Simon, born say 1720, taxable in the Mattapany Hundred, Somerset County household of Emanuel Harman in 1736 and 1737, called "Simon" in 1736, "Simon Colleck" in 1737 [List of Tithables, 1736, 1737]. He owed the Worcester County estate of Peter Beckett 1 pound on 23 January 1754 and the Worcester County estate of Alexander Buncle 6 shillings on 3 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89; 72:137-42]. He was a "Negro" taxable on 100 acres called Spences Venture and another 12 acres called Conveniency's Addition in Bogerternorton Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 [MdHR MSA S1161-11-6, p.2]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 (Simon Kollok). He was charged with assault and battery in Sussex County court in May 1773 and November 1778 [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frames 133, 204]. iii. Mary Kollock, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. iv William, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:622]. He mortgaged a sailboat and a yoke of oxen to Levin Conner on 14 February 1823 and sold a yoke of steers and the service of his son Benjamin until the age of twenty-one for $19.25 by Worcester County deed of 24 February 1823 [DB AO:391-2, 419-20].. 1. Samuel Collick, born say 1718, purchased 49 acres in Worcester County, Maryland, called Red Oak Ridge, on the north side of the Pocomoke River in Indian Town on 6 June 1744 [Land Records A:193]. He was a "Mollato" taxable on 49 acres in Acquango Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-11-5, p.2]. He died sometime before 16 October 1801 when his wife, Esther, and children: Charles Collick, Leah Roberts, Comfort Collick, Betsy Collick, and Hetty Collick sold Red Oak Ridge and an adjoining 8-1/2 acres, called Equantico Savannah, which Esther had purchased [Land Records, U:405]. Esther was head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:828]. (There was also an Esther Collick counted as head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:814]). Samuel and Esther's children were i. Charles, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830]. ii. Leah Roberts. iii. Comfort. iv. Betsy. v. Hetty.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Worcester
Family Name Collick/Kollock
Family History Notes 1 i. Samuel, born say 1718. ii. Simon, born say 1720, taxable in the Mattapany Hundred, Somerset County household of Emanuel Harman in 1736 and 1737, called "Simon" in 1736, "Simon Colleck" in 1737 [List of Tithables, 1736, 1737]. He owed the Worcester County estate of Peter Beckett 1 pound on 23 January 1754 and the Worcester County estate of Alexander Buncle 6 shillings on 3 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89; 72:137-42]. He was a "Negro" taxable on 100 acres called Spences Venture and another 12 acres called Conveniency's Addition in Bogerternorton Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 [MdHR MSA S1161-11-6, p.2]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 (Simon Kollok). He was charged with assault and battery in Sussex County court in May 1773 and November 1778 [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frames 133, 204]. iii. Mary Kollock, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. iv William, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:622]. He mortgaged a sailboat and a yoke of oxen to Levin Conner on 14 February 1823 and sold a yoke of steers and the service of his son Benjamin until the age of twenty-one for $19.25 by Worcester County deed of 24 February 1823 [DB AO:391-2, 419-20].. 1. Samuel Collick, born say 1718, purchased 49 acres in Worcester County, Maryland, called Red Oak Ridge, on the north side of the Pocomoke River in Indian Town on 6 June 1744 [Land Records A:193]. He was a "Mollato" taxable on 49 acres in Acquango Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-11-5, p.2]. He died sometime before 16 October 1801 when his wife, Esther, and children: Charles Collick, Leah Roberts, Comfort Collick, Betsy Collick, and Hetty Collick sold Red Oak Ridge and an adjoining 8-1/2 acres, called Equantico Savannah, which Esther had purchased [Land Records, U:405]. Esther was head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:828]. (There was also an Esther Collick counted as head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:814]). Samuel and Esther's children were i. Charles, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830]. ii. Leah Roberts. iii. Comfort. iv. Betsy. v. Hetty.
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Family Name Cornish
Family History Notes 1. Jack Cornish, born about 1682, was a "Negro" man slave, 77 years old, listed in the inventory of the Dorchester County estate of Colonel John Eccleston in 1759 [Prerogative Inventories, 68:59-68]. He may have been the ancestor of i. William1, born say 1715, a brick maker sued in Dorchester County by John Carville in March 1755 for a debt of 2 pounds, 8 shillings which William had owed since 1753 [Judgment Records, 1754-5, 241-3], probably identical to the William Cornish who was imprisoned for debt in Sussex County, Delaware, and petitioned the court in February 1750 to serve Jacob Kollock, Esq., to pay the debt. The court charged him with assault in August 1757 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 516; 1753-60, 381, 384, 403, 421, 446]. He owed the estate of Peter Beckett of Worcester County 2 pounds, 5 shillings on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89]. He died before 19 March 1760 when his debt of 4 pounds, 4 shillings to the Dorchester County estate of Colonel Joseph Ennalls was determined to be unrecoverable because of his death. Perhaps his widow was Elizabeth Cornish who owed the estate 9 shillings [Prerogative Inventories 76:169-183]. 2 ii. Esau, born say 1718. 3 iii. Samuel1, born say 1720. iv. John1/ Jack, born about 1728, living in Dorchester County on 20 October 1745 when Charles Hudson and Thomas Stewart posted bond for his good behavior and appearance in November Court [Judgment Record 1744-5, 468]. He ran away from his master John Turner in September 1762 according to an ad placed by Turner in the 28 April 1763 issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette: run away from the subscriber, living in Dorchester County, Maryland, in September last, a Mulatto Fellow, called Jack Cornish, about 35 Years of Age, and by Trade a Weaver, about 5 feet high, his Visage is round, his Complexion light for a Mulatto, and his Carriage very stately, pretending to be very genteel, talkative and complaisant [Pennsylvania Gazette, http://www.accessible.com]. He was head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 2 "Negroes" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 53]. He may have been the John Cornish who was charged with felony by the Kent County, Delaware court in August 1790. He pled guilty and was ordered to wear a Roman T [RG 3805.002, 1787-1803, frame 156]. 4 v. Sidney, born say 1724. 5 vi. Rebecca, born say 1742. 2. Esau Cornish, born say 1718, was bondsman for the appearance of (his brother?) Samuel Cornish in Dorchester County court in November 1742 [Judgment Record 1742-3, 43-4]. He owed 5 pounds of tobacco to the Dorchester County estate of Howels Goldsbrough in 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 75:303-5]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1770. He left a 7 December 1770 Sussex County will in which he named his wife Mary, son Samuel, son Amos, and daughters Sarah and Elener. His wife Mary and son Samuel were executors [WB B:408-9]. He was the father of 6 i. Samuel2, born say 1742. ii. Amos, charged with felony in Sussex County court in February 1773. Mary Cursey was a witness against him [RG 4805, General Sessions 1767-94, frames 126, 154, 167, 181]. He called himself a "Mollatto" in the 14 July 1786 Worcester County deed by which he sold half the corn and crop on Thomas Benston's land that he owned by agreement with Benston for 8 pounds, 13 shillings [DB L:400]. iii. Sarah, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458]. iv. Eleanor. 3. Samuel1 Cornish, born say 1720, was sued in Dorchester County court in November 1742 for a 32 pound debt [Judgment Record 1742-3, 43-4]. He may have been identical to ____ Cornish who married _____ in Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church, Sussex County, in 1768 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 124]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1773 to 1790 and head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He may have been the father of i. Sally, born say 1750, married Moses Parkinson ("Molattoes") on 7 January 1771 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Coolspring, Delaware 1756-1855, 282]. 4. Sidney Cornish, born say 1724, a "Spinster," was living in Dorchester County in March 1744/5 when she was found not guilty of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." She was assessed court costs which Lewis Griffith agreed to pay [Judgment Record 1744-5, 347]. She may have been the mother of 7 i. Ann1, born say 1744. 8 ii. Christianna, born say 1747. iii. Daniel, born about 1749, a "Mullatto Boy" aged fifteen years and bound until the age of thirty-one on 4 December 1765 when he was listed in the Queen Anne's County estate of Henry Costin, Jr, [Prerogative Inventories 94: 211-2]. iv. Ebby, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:684]. v. Samuel3, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1790. vi. Sol, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684]. 5. Rebecca Cornish, born say 1742, was the spinster servant of John Ross of Talbot County in November 1763 when the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years after the completion of her indenture to her master and sold her son Levin Cornish to her master for 3 pounds. She admitted in August 1766 that she had another child by a "Negro" and paid twice the normal fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings because she would not identify the father. In June 1767 she was convicted of fornication and found guilty of stealing gloves, brass buttons, a handkerchief and several other items from Cornelius Dailey. The court ordered that she receive 15 lashes, stand in the pillory and pay four times the value of the goods or 1,500 pounds of tobacco. She was convicted of assaulting Elizabeth Heels in November 1770 and ordered to pay a shilling fine [Criminal Record 1761-7, 235-6, 465; 1767-74, n.p.]. She was a "free Mulatto" head of a Bay Hundred, Talbot County household of 1 male under 16, 1 female under 16 and a "Black" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 156]. She was the mother of i. Levin, born about 1763, indicted for an unspecified offense in Sussex County in May 1780 [RG 4805, General Sessions 1767-94, frame 243], a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1781, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:83]. 9 ii. ?Charles, born say 1764. 6. Samuel2 Cornish, born say 1742, was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1790 [Levy List 1767-83; 1780-96] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He died before 12 April 1811 when his Sussex County estate was administered by Rachel and William Cornish. His heirs were Rachel, William, John, Elon, Mary, Samuel, Rachel, Hetty and James Cornish, Sarah Morris and Nancy Gurley. Rachel was head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:468] and an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222], perhaps the Rachel Cornish who was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 or the one who was head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. Their children may have been i. Nancy Gurley, probably the wife of Bryan Gurley, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:425] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:218]. ii. William, taxable in Indian River Hundred in Sussex County in 1797 [RG 4200.027, Levy Court, reel 2, frame 176]. iii. John2, born 1776-1794, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:427] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220]. iv. Rachel. v. Samuel. vi. Hetty. vii. Sarah, married Nathaniel Morris, "free Mulattoes," on 5 December 1802 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315, 318]. viii. James. 7. Ann Cornish, born say 1744, paid a 1 pound, 10 shillings fine in Talbot County court in November 1761 for having an illegitimate child [Criminal Record 1755-61, n.p.]. She was head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:685]. She was the mother of i. ?Elisha, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:684]. On 15 August 1806 he manumitted his forty-year-old slave Thomas Jolly by Dorchester County deed [DB HD 23:446-7]. ii. Lisbon, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 September 1815: of a blackish colour ... born free ... son of Ann Cornish who was also born free, aged about 25 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 29]. 8. Christianna Cornish, born say 1747, was the mother of 9 i. David, born about 1768. 10 ii. ?Henny, born say 1770. 9. Charles Cornish, born say 1764, was listed as one of the recruits from Caroline County in the Revolution "to the 10th December on 14 August 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:385]. He was head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in Baltimore City in 1800 [MD:169]. He may have been the father of i. Rachel, a "free black" who married Isaac Elzey, the slave of George Hall in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore on 28 June 1795 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:88]. 10. David Cornish, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 September 1821: of a light chesnut colour ... free born and is the son of Christianna Cornish who was free born, was raised in Somerset County ... aged about 53 years. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. He and his wife Nancy were the parents of i. Ann2, born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 September 1822: yellow complection ... raised in Dorchester County and born free and is the Daughter of David Cornish and Nancy his wife, aged about 16 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 45, 47]. 11. Henny Cornish, born say 1770, was the mother of i. Amelia, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 October 1816: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the Daughter of Henny Cornish who was also born free, aged about 25 years. ii. Milley, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 August 1821: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Henny who was also born free, aged about 27 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 34, 44].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Cornish
Family History Notes 1. Jack Cornish, born about 1682, was a "Negro" man slave, 77 years old, listed in the inventory of the Dorchester County estate of Colonel John Eccleston in 1759 [Prerogative Inventories, 68:59-68]. He may have been the ancestor of i. William1, born say 1715, a brick maker sued in Dorchester County by John Carville in March 1755 for a debt of 2 pounds, 8 shillings which William had owed since 1753 [Judgment Records, 1754-5, 241-3], probably identical to the William Cornish who was imprisoned for debt in Sussex County, Delaware, and petitioned the court in February 1750 to serve Jacob Kollock, Esq., to pay the debt. The court charged him with assault in August 1757 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 516; 1753-60, 381, 384, 403, 421, 446]. He owed the estate of Peter Beckett of Worcester County 2 pounds, 5 shillings on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89]. He died before 19 March 1760 when his debt of 4 pounds, 4 shillings to the Dorchester County estate of Colonel Joseph Ennalls was determined to be unrecoverable because of his death. Perhaps his widow was Elizabeth Cornish who owed the estate 9 shillings [Prerogative Inventories 76:169-183]. 2 ii. Esau, born say 1718. 3 iii. Samuel1, born say 1720. iv. John1/ Jack, born about 1728, living in Dorchester County on 20 October 1745 when Charles Hudson and Thomas Stewart posted bond for his good behavior and appearance in November Court [Judgment Record 1744-5, 468]. He ran away from his master John Turner in September 1762 according to an ad placed by Turner in the 28 April 1763 issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette: run away from the subscriber, living in Dorchester County, Maryland, in September last, a Mulatto Fellow, called Jack Cornish, about 35 Years of Age, and by Trade a Weaver, about 5 feet high, his Visage is round, his Complexion light for a Mulatto, and his Carriage very stately, pretending to be very genteel, talkative and complaisant [Pennsylvania Gazette, http://www.accessible.com]. He was head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 2 "Negroes" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 53]. He may have been the John Cornish who was charged with felony by the Kent County, Delaware court in August 1790. He pled guilty and was ordered to wear a Roman T [RG 3805.002, 1787-1803, frame 156]. 4 v. Sidney, born say 1724. 5 vi. Rebecca, born say 1742. 2. Esau Cornish, born say 1718, was bondsman for the appearance of (his brother?) Samuel Cornish in Dorchester County court in November 1742 [Judgment Record 1742-3, 43-4]. He owed 5 pounds of tobacco to the Dorchester County estate of Howels Goldsbrough in 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 75:303-5]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1770. He left a 7 December 1770 Sussex County will in which he named his wife Mary, son Samuel, son Amos, and daughters Sarah and Elener. His wife Mary and son Samuel were executors [WB B:408-9]. He was the father of 6 i. Samuel2, born say 1742. ii. Amos, charged with felony in Sussex County court in February 1773. Mary Cursey was a witness against him [RG 4805, General Sessions 1767-94, frames 126, 154, 167, 181]. He called himself a "Mollatto" in the 14 July 1786 Worcester County deed by which he sold half the corn and crop on Thomas Benston's land that he owned by agreement with Benston for 8 pounds, 13 shillings [DB L:400]. iii. Sarah, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458]. iv. Eleanor. 3. Samuel1 Cornish, born say 1720, was sued in Dorchester County court in November 1742 for a 32 pound debt [Judgment Record 1742-3, 43-4]. He may have been identical to ____ Cornish who married _____ in Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church, Sussex County, in 1768 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 124]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1773 to 1790 and head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He may have been the father of i. Sally, born say 1750, married Moses Parkinson ("Molattoes") on 7 January 1771 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Coolspring, Delaware 1756-1855, 282]. 4. Sidney Cornish, born say 1724, a "Spinster," was living in Dorchester County in March 1744/5 when she was found not guilty of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." She was assessed court costs which Lewis Griffith agreed to pay [Judgment Record 1744-5, 347]. She may have been the mother of 7 i. Ann1, born say 1744. 8 ii. Christianna, born say 1747. iii. Daniel, born about 1749, a "Mullatto Boy" aged fifteen years and bound until the age of thirty-one on 4 December 1765 when he was listed in the Queen Anne's County estate of Henry Costin, Jr, [Prerogative Inventories 94: 211-2]. iv. Ebby, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:684]. v. Samuel3, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1790. vi. Sol, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684]. 5. Rebecca Cornish, born say 1742, was the spinster servant of John Ross of Talbot County in November 1763 when the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years after the completion of her indenture to her master and sold her son Levin Cornish to her master for 3 pounds. She admitted in August 1766 that she had another child by a "Negro" and paid twice the normal fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings because she would not identify the father. In June 1767 she was convicted of fornication and found guilty of stealing gloves, brass buttons, a handkerchief and several other items from Cornelius Dailey. The court ordered that she receive 15 lashes, stand in the pillory and pay four times the value of the goods or 1,500 pounds of tobacco. She was convicted of assaulting Elizabeth Heels in November 1770 and ordered to pay a shilling fine [Criminal Record 1761-7, 235-6, 465; 1767-74, n.p.]. She was a "free Mulatto" head of a Bay Hundred, Talbot County household of 1 male under 16, 1 female under 16 and a "Black" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 156]. She was the mother of i. Levin, born about 1763, indicted for an unspecified offense in Sussex County in May 1780 [RG 4805, General Sessions 1767-94, frame 243], a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1781, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:83]. 9 ii. ?Charles, born say 1764. 6. Samuel2 Cornish, born say 1742, was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1790 [Levy List 1767-83; 1780-96] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He died before 12 April 1811 when his Sussex County estate was administered by Rachel and William Cornish. His heirs were Rachel, William, John, Elon, Mary, Samuel, Rachel, Hetty and James Cornish, Sarah Morris and Nancy Gurley. Rachel was head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:468] and an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222], perhaps the Rachel Cornish who was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 or the one who was head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. Their children may have been i. Nancy Gurley, probably the wife of Bryan Gurley, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:425] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:218]. ii. William, taxable in Indian River Hundred in Sussex County in 1797 [RG 4200.027, Levy Court, reel 2, frame 176]. iii. John2, born 1776-1794, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:427] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220]. iv. Rachel. v. Samuel. vi. Hetty. vii. Sarah, married Nathaniel Morris, "free Mulattoes," on 5 December 1802 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315, 318]. viii. James. 7. Ann Cornish, born say 1744, paid a 1 pound, 10 shillings fine in Talbot County court in November 1761 for having an illegitimate child [Criminal Record 1755-61, n.p.]. She was head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:685]. She was the mother of i. ?Elisha, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:684]. On 15 August 1806 he manumitted his forty-year-old slave Thomas Jolly by Dorchester County deed [DB HD 23:446-7]. ii. Lisbon, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 September 1815: of a blackish colour ... born free ... son of Ann Cornish who was also born free, aged about 25 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 29]. 8. Christianna Cornish, born say 1747, was the mother of 9 i. David, born about 1768. 10 ii. ?Henny, born say 1770. 9. Charles Cornish, born say 1764, was listed as one of the recruits from Caroline County in the Revolution "to the 10th December on 14 August 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:385]. He was head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in Baltimore City in 1800 [MD:169]. He may have been the father of i. Rachel, a "free black" who married Isaac Elzey, the slave of George Hall in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore on 28 June 1795 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:88]. 10. David Cornish, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 September 1821: of a light chesnut colour ... free born and is the son of Christianna Cornish who was free born, was raised in Somerset County ... aged about 53 years. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. He and his wife Nancy were the parents of i. Ann2, born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 September 1822: yellow complection ... raised in Dorchester County and born free and is the Daughter of David Cornish and Nancy his wife, aged about 16 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 45, 47]. 11. Henny Cornish, born say 1770, was the mother of i. Amelia, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 October 1816: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the Daughter of Henny Cornish who was also born free, aged about 25 years. ii. Milley, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 August 1821: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Henny who was also born free, aged about 27 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 34, 44].
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Family Name Coursey, Kersey
Family History Notes Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of i. Nero, born in February 1741/2. ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790. iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen. Endnote: 1. There was a Charles Coursey who was an Indian living in Somerset County, Maryland, when he owed 13 shillings to the estate of Mathias Gale in 1731 and 2 pounds, 3 shillings to the estate of Levin Gale in 1743 [Prerogative Inventories 77 (1762): 121, 158], but there were no non-white Courseys mentioned in the records of Sussex County, Delaware or Somerset and Worcester counties until the 1820 census.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Somerset
Family Name Coursey, Kersey
Family History Notes Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of i. Nero, born in February 1741/2. ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790. iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen. Endnote: 1. There was a Charles Coursey who was an Indian living in Somerset County, Maryland, when he owed 13 shillings to the estate of Mathias Gale in 1731 and 2 pounds, 3 shillings to the estate of Levin Gale in 1743 [Prerogative Inventories 77 (1762): 121, 158], but there were no non-white Courseys mentioned in the records of Sussex County, Delaware or Somerset and Worcester counties until the 1820 census.
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Family Name Cox
Family History Notes 1. Elizabeth Cox, born say 1688, was the white servant of Thomas Coleman on 12 November 1706 when the Charles County court ordered her to serve him an additional 250 days for running away. Later that day in the same court she confessed to having an illegitimate "Mollatto" child for which she was sold (as a servant) to Jacob Miller for 2,000 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1704-10, 271, 274]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Abner, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:174]. Members of the Cox family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were 1 i. Jemima, born about 1741. 2 ii. Ann, born say 1748. 1. Jemima Cox, born about 1741, was a "Mulatto Wench" with twelve years and nine months to serve when she was listed in the Dorchester County estate of Margery Gibb on 30 December 1760 [Prerogative Inventories 76:333]. She may have been the mother of i. Stephen, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684]. 2. Ann Cox, born say 1748, was bound as a "Mulatto" servant bound to Mary Hatcheson for thirty-one years in March 1769 when she confessed to the Kent County court that she had two illegitimate children during her service. The court ordered that she be brought to court to be sold when she arrived to the age of thirty one [Criminal Dockets 1766-71, nos. 8,9]. She was probably related to i. Levin, head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790. ii. Jacob, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. iii. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:531].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Talbot
Family Name Cox
Family History Notes 1. Elizabeth Cox, born say 1688, was the white servant of Thomas Coleman on 12 November 1706 when the Charles County court ordered her to serve him an additional 250 days for running away. Later that day in the same court she confessed to having an illegitimate "Mollatto" child for which she was sold (as a servant) to Jacob Miller for 2,000 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1704-10, 271, 274]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Abner, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:174]. Members of the Cox family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were 1 i. Jemima, born about 1741. 2 ii. Ann, born say 1748. 1. Jemima Cox, born about 1741, was a "Mulatto Wench" with twelve years and nine months to serve when she was listed in the Dorchester County estate of Margery Gibb on 30 December 1760 [Prerogative Inventories 76:333]. She may have been the mother of i. Stephen, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684]. 2. Ann Cox, born say 1748, was bound as a "Mulatto" servant bound to Mary Hatcheson for thirty-one years in March 1769 when she confessed to the Kent County court that she had two illegitimate children during her service. The court ordered that she be brought to court to be sold when she arrived to the age of thirty one [Criminal Dockets 1766-71, nos. 8,9]. She was probably related to i. Levin, head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790. ii. Jacob, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. iii. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:531].
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Family Name Dawson
Family History Notes Members of a Dawson family in Talbot County were i. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:540], perhaps the husband of Patty Dawson, born about 1773 who obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 13 June 1818: a negro woman ... about 45 years of age, 5 feet 2 1/2 Inches high ... born free and raised in the County. ii. Isaac, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 19 July 1806: five feet, one inch high, twenty six years of age, of a yellowish complextion ... raised in Talbot county ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 84, 150]. iii. Stepney, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:172].
All Fields in This Record
State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Dawson
Family History Notes Members of a Dawson family in Talbot County were i. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:540], perhaps the husband of Patty Dawson, born about 1773 who obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 13 June 1818: a negro woman ... about 45 years of age, 5 feet 2 1/2 Inches high ... born free and raised in the County. ii. Isaac, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 19 July 1806: five feet, one inch high, twenty six years of age, of a yellowish complextion ... raised in Talbot county ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 84, 150]. iii. Stepney, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:172].
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Family Name Dobson
Family History Notes 1. Margaret Dobson, born say 1722, the white servant of Nicholas Goldsborough of St. Peter's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1742 that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her daughter Diana, born 6 May 1742, to her master until the age of thirty-one. In March 1744/5 she was sold for a second term of seven years, and the court bound her "Mulatto" son James to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was living in St. Michaels Parish on 20 October 1747 when she was convicted of having her son Jethro by a "Negro" [Judgment Record 1742, 293; 1744-5, 238-9; Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the mother of 2 i. Diana, born 6 May 1742. ii. James, born in 1745, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:507]. iii. Jethro, born about January 1747, nine months old on 20 October 1747 when he was sold to Nicholas Benson for the 4 pounds which was due to him for keeping Jethro for the first nine months of his life [Judgment Record 1747-50, n.p]. 2. Diana Dobson, born 6 May 1742, was the servant of Nicholas Goldsborough, Sr., in November 1764 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having two illegitimate children [Criminal Record 1761-7, 311-3]. She may have been the mother of i. Abram, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:537]. ii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:444] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:324]. They were probably the ancestors of i. Isaac, born about 1766, manumitted by Archelus Price of Talbot County on 16 August 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom on 29 September 1812: a Mullatto Man ... named Isaac Dobson who is now about 46 years of age, 5 feet 5 3/4 in. high ... set free by him the said Archelus Price on the 16 August 1808 [Certificates of Freedom 1807-28, 40].
All Fields in This Record
State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Dobson
Family History Notes 1. Margaret Dobson, born say 1722, the white servant of Nicholas Goldsborough of St. Peter's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1742 that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her daughter Diana, born 6 May 1742, to her master until the age of thirty-one. In March 1744/5 she was sold for a second term of seven years, and the court bound her "Mulatto" son James to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was living in St. Michaels Parish on 20 October 1747 when she was convicted of having her son Jethro by a "Negro" [Judgment Record 1742, 293; 1744-5, 238-9; Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the mother of 2 i. Diana, born 6 May 1742. ii. James, born in 1745, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:507]. iii. Jethro, born about January 1747, nine months old on 20 October 1747 when he was sold to Nicholas Benson for the 4 pounds which was due to him for keeping Jethro for the first nine months of his life [Judgment Record 1747-50, n.p]. 2. Diana Dobson, born 6 May 1742, was the servant of Nicholas Goldsborough, Sr., in November 1764 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having two illegitimate children [Criminal Record 1761-7, 311-3]. She may have been the mother of i. Abram, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:537]. ii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:444] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:324]. They were probably the ancestors of i. Isaac, born about 1766, manumitted by Archelus Price of Talbot County on 16 August 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom on 29 September 1812: a Mullatto Man ... named Isaac Dobson who is now about 46 years of age, 5 feet 5 3/4 in. high ... set free by him the said Archelus Price on the 16 August 1808 [Certificates of Freedom 1807-28, 40].
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Family Name Dogan
Family History Notes 1. Alice1 Dogan, born about 1685, was called the "Mallato" servant of Captain Thomas Dickson of Coventry Parish in March 1711/2 when the Somerset County court convicted her of having a child in 1703 by "Harry her Master's Negroe" at Annemessex. On 9 November 1711 the court presented her for having a child about September 1711, and on 4 March 1713/4 she confessed to the court that she had a child by "Abram, Mrs. Coulbourne's Negro," in Stepney Parish. The court sold her child to Samuel Handy, Gent., until the age of thirty-one for 1,000 pounds of tobacco and ordered her to serve another four years. On 4 August 1713 she complained to the court that she was about twenty-eight years old and ought to be free, and in June 1714 the court sold her children Shelly, over five years old, and George, to be two, to her master for 1,500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Records 1711-13, 91-2, 132; 1713-5, 27, 69, 299]. She was the ancestor of i. Shelly, born about 1709. ii. George, born about 1712. 2 iii. ?Catherine1, born say 1714. iv. ?Leah, a spinster (no race indicated), confessed to the Somerset County court on 15 November 1768 that she had an illegitimate child. She refused to name the father and paid a fine of three pounds [Judicial Record 1767-9, 70, 237]. 2. Catherine1 Dogan, born say 1714, had an illegitimate child named Toby who was born on 2 October 1732 and bound out until the age of twenty-one by the Somerset County in March 1732/3. She was apparently identical to "Kate free mollatto" of Coventry Parish, the servant of William Coulbourn, who confessed to the Somerset County court on 15 March 1736/7 that she had a child named Alice, born six months previous, by a "negro." The court sold Alice to William Colebourn, Jr., until the age of thirty-one for 50 shillings. The court indicted her again for fornication in August 1737 [Judicial Record 1737-8, 2-3, 126]. She was the mother of i. Alice2, born about September 1736, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:529]. ii. ?Catherine2, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Dogan
Family History Notes 1. Alice1 Dogan, born about 1685, was called the "Mallato" servant of Captain Thomas Dickson of Coventry Parish in March 1711/2 when the Somerset County court convicted her of having a child in 1703 by "Harry her Master's Negroe" at Annemessex. On 9 November 1711 the court presented her for having a child about September 1711, and on 4 March 1713/4 she confessed to the court that she had a child by "Abram, Mrs. Coulbourne's Negro," in Stepney Parish. The court sold her child to Samuel Handy, Gent., until the age of thirty-one for 1,000 pounds of tobacco and ordered her to serve another four years. On 4 August 1713 she complained to the court that she was about twenty-eight years old and ought to be free, and in June 1714 the court sold her children Shelly, over five years old, and George, to be two, to her master for 1,500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Records 1711-13, 91-2, 132; 1713-5, 27, 69, 299]. She was the ancestor of i. Shelly, born about 1709. ii. George, born about 1712. 2 iii. ?Catherine1, born say 1714. iv. ?Leah, a spinster (no race indicated), confessed to the Somerset County court on 15 November 1768 that she had an illegitimate child. She refused to name the father and paid a fine of three pounds [Judicial Record 1767-9, 70, 237]. 2. Catherine1 Dogan, born say 1714, had an illegitimate child named Toby who was born on 2 October 1732 and bound out until the age of twenty-one by the Somerset County in March 1732/3. She was apparently identical to "Kate free mollatto" of Coventry Parish, the servant of William Coulbourn, who confessed to the Somerset County court on 15 March 1736/7 that she had a child named Alice, born six months previous, by a "negro." The court sold Alice to William Colebourn, Jr., until the age of thirty-one for 50 shillings. The court indicted her again for fornication in August 1737 [Judicial Record 1737-8, 2-3, 126]. She was the mother of i. Alice2, born about September 1736, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:529]. ii. ?Catherine2, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.
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Family Name Donaldson
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Donalson, born say 1734, the spinster servant of Abigail Wilson, admitted to the Somerset County court in March 1757 that she was guilty of "Inordinate Copulation" by having a child by a slave the prior month. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and bound her daughter Sarah to James Wilson until the age of thirty-one. In June 1763 she confessed that she had a "Negro Bastard" child by "Negro Bristo," a slave of Elizabeth Waters, and the court bound their daughter Rhoda to James Wilson for thirty-one years and ordered Sarah to be sold for seven years after the completion of her service [Judicial Record 1757-60, 2-3]. She was the mother of i. Rhoda, born 20 December 1762. 2 ii. ?Bridget, born say 1752. iii. Sarah, born February 1757. 2. Bridget Donaldson, born say 1752, the "free Mulatto" servant of James Wilson, admitted to the Somerset County court that she had a child by a "Negro slave." The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her son Levin to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Record 1769-72, 139]. She was the mother of i. Levin, born in 1770.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Donaldson
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Donalson, born say 1734, the spinster servant of Abigail Wilson, admitted to the Somerset County court in March 1757 that she was guilty of "Inordinate Copulation" by having a child by a slave the prior month. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and bound her daughter Sarah to James Wilson until the age of thirty-one. In June 1763 she confessed that she had a "Negro Bastard" child by "Negro Bristo," a slave of Elizabeth Waters, and the court bound their daughter Rhoda to James Wilson for thirty-one years and ordered Sarah to be sold for seven years after the completion of her service [Judicial Record 1757-60, 2-3]. She was the mother of i. Rhoda, born 20 December 1762. 2 ii. ?Bridget, born say 1752. iii. Sarah, born February 1757. 2. Bridget Donaldson, born say 1752, the "free Mulatto" servant of James Wilson, admitted to the Somerset County court that she had a child by a "Negro slave." The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her son Levin to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Record 1769-72, 139]. She was the mother of i. Levin, born in 1770.
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Family Name Downs
Family History Notes 1. Eliza Downes, born say 1708, was the servant of Sarah Dashiell of Stepney Parish on 15 March 1725/6 when the Somerset County court ordered that she be sold for seven years for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1725-7, 97]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Paddy, "N." head of a Muddy Branch, Little Creek, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:31]. ii. James, "N." head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE;46]. iii. James, head of a Little Creek, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40]. iv. Isaac, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:35]. v. Charles, (Negro) head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:194]. vi. Ben, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195]. vii. Daniel, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195].
All Fields in This Record
State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Kent, Caroline
Family Name Downs
Family History Notes 1. Eliza Downes, born say 1708, was the servant of Sarah Dashiell of Stepney Parish on 15 March 1725/6 when the Somerset County court ordered that she be sold for seven years for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1725-7, 97]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Paddy, "N." head of a Muddy Branch, Little Creek, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:31]. ii. James, "N." head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE;46]. iii. James, head of a Little Creek, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40]. iv. Isaac, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:35]. v. Charles, (Negro) head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:194]. vi. Ben, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195]. vii. Daniel, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195].
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Family Name Driggers
Family History Notes The Driggers family originated in Northampton County, Virginia where they were free by 1645. They spread to Maryland, Delaware, North Carolina and South Carolina during the colonial period. See the Virginia section for the entire Driggers history. Listed below are the branches of the family which lived in Maryland and Delaware. 1. Emmanuel Driggers, "Negroe," born say 1620, was the slave of Francis Pott on his plantation in Magotha Bay, Northampton County, Virginia. He was free by 27 May 1645 when he purchased a cow and calf from Pott and recorded the sale in the Northampton County court [DW 1645-51, 82]. His children were 2 i. Thomas, born about 1644. 3 ii. Devorick/ Devorax1, born say 1656. 2. Thomas Driggers, born about 1644, remained a slave in Northampton County. He married a free woman named Sarah King, daughter of "King Toney Negro." She was in Somerset County, Maryland, before 23 April 1688 when she, called "negroe Woman & wife to Thomas Griggers Negro," complained to the Somerset County court that Margaret Holder had stolen some of her goods. Peter George, "Negroe" of Wiccocomoco Hundred, posted five pounds sterling security for Sarah's appearance. The court heard testimony from Peter George, Mary George, Mary Johnson, and Sarah Driggers, Jr., and found in favor of Margaret Holder. By 14 August 1688 Sarah, Peter George, three unnamed women, and an unstated number of men petitioned the Somerset County court to stop taxing them as slaves since they were free born. The court ruled that for that year the women should be exempt, but the men should pay taxes. The court also ordered that they obtain certificates from where they formerly lived to prove that they were free born [Archives of Maryland 91:47; Judicial Record, 1687-89, 58]. In 1689 Sarah was back in Northampton County [Orders 1679-89, 463]. Their children were free because their mother was free. Two of their children who moved to Delaware and Maryland were i. Sarah1, born say 1667, raised by John and Christian Francisco until she was twenty-one years old. In 1691 she was bound to William Kenny "to go to the Southward with him" [OW 1689-98, 121, 125]. He may have been the William Kening, Jr., who sued Sarah Driger for defamation in Sussex County, Delaware Court on 3 June 1691 [Court Records 1680-99, 497]. She brought a successful suit against Edward Fadlooks(?) in Kent County, Delaware Court on 14 November 1717 [Court Dockets 1680- February 1725, fol. 119]. 4 ii. William2, born say 1682. 3. Devorick/ Devorix1 Driggers, born say 1656, was the son of Emmanuel Driggers, a slave who was freed in Northampton County, Virginia. Deverax received a bay mare from his father by a 1673 Northampton County deed [D&c 1668-80, fol.59-60]. He moved to Somerset County, Maryland, about 1677 when he was one of the headrights claimed by Stephen Cosden in his patent [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 15:433]. In 1689 he signed a Somerset County address of loyalty to King William and Queen Mary [Torrence, Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore, 349]. On 12 January 1701/2 he provided security in Somerset County court for Deborah Wildgoose who had an illegitimate child by Samuel Webb. He was living in All Hollows Parish when he and several whites were presented for being drunk on the Sabbath. He was acquitted after paying court costs [Judicial Records 1702-5, Liber G-I, 21; 1707-17, 16]. He was renting a 300 acre plantation in Bogerternorten Hundred of Somerset County in 1707 [Somerset County Rent Roll, 1707, Calvert Papers, ms. 174, MHS]. He received a cow from his sister in Somerset County on 27 July 1708 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 1 (Somerset County Livestock Marks), 160]. He died before 2 March 1708/9 when court suits against him by David Hudson and John Swann & Co. were suspended by his death [Judicial Record 1707-11, 176, 215]. His estate was valued at about 37 pounds [Inventories and Accounts, Liber 30:88]. His administrator John Jermain was sued by a number of Deverix's creditors to whom he had written promissory notes at Snow Hill, one of them his lawyer for six cases between March 1698 and March 1706. Jermain recovered 1,600 pounds of tobacco that William Godard of Wicomico had owed Deverix [Judicial Record 1706-11, 223-4, 228, 256-60, 434; 1711-13, 57]. He may have been the father of i. Devorax2 Driggers, born about 1680, was a "Molatto" Accomack County tithable in Jonathan Owen's household in 1696. He was sued by Robert Houston in Accomack County court on 7 August 1704 [Orders 1690-7, 222a, 224, 235; 1703-9, 30a]. He and (his wife?) Arendia Driggas were witnesses with Thomas Purnell to the 24 December 1720 Somerset County will of Henry Hudson, Sr., a wealthy planter [Maryland Wills 16:279; Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, 5:36]. He was taxable in Thomas Purnell's household in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in 1723 and 1724 and in Peter Beckett's household in 1725, listed in Baltimore Hundred from 1730 to 1733 [List of Taxables]. He was called a carpenter on 17 November 1730 he admitted in Somerset County court that he owed Christopher Glass for 500 pounds of tobacco and 650 pounds of beef which he had contracted for in writing on 10 November 1729. Peter Beckett provided special bail for him [Judicial Record 1730-3, 43-4]. On 16 June 1731 he purchased 75 acres in Somerset County on St. Martins River in present-day Worcester County [Land Records, Liber SH:324]. He and his wife Ann sold this land in 1734 and were renting it in 1748 [Worcester County Debt Book, 1748, 190]. They may have been the parents of an apprentice named Davarix Drigus who was valued at 6 pounds in the inventory of the estate of Thomas Parnall in June 1723 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1724-1725, 263]. He may have been the father of 4. William2 Driggus, born say 1682, was probably the son of Thomas Driggers, a Northampton County slave, and his wife Sarah King. William was called the "Maletto Servant" of Daniel Neech when he recorded his cattle mark in Northampton County court in 1698 [DW 1651-54, 30 at end of volume]. He was living in Somerset County, Maryland, in April 1708 when he was presented for carrying Mary Winslow out of the county to avoid prosecution for having an illegitimate child by Daniel Francisco. The court ordered that he, a "Mollatto," receive twenty-five lashes when he told the justices that they had no more to do with sd Woman than his Arse Edward Winslow and David Hudson were security for him [Judicial Records 1707-11, 94, 96, 102; 1713-5, 5, 26]. William signed his 7 January 1720 Somerset County will which was proved 7 May 1722. He left his 100 acre plantation called "Drigus Adventure" to his son William and mentioned unnamed children under eighteen years old and his wife, Jane. He specified that his children were to be cared for by their uncle, John Driggus of Accomack County, if his wife remarried. The inventory of his estate included a parcel of old books [Maryland Wills, Liber 17:285; Inventories 8:65]. Jane was called a "maleto widow" in 1724 when Winslow Driggus (William's son by Mary Winslow?) was taxable in her Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County household [List of Taxables]. William's children were i. William3, born about 1702. 5 ii. ?Winslow1, born say 1705. iii. ?John, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County from 1734 to 1740. iv. Sabra, born say 1722, presented by the Somerset County court on 17 November 1741 for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1740-2, 175]. 5. Winslow1 Driggers, born say 1705, was taxable in the Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of Jane Drigus in 1724 and in the household of Isabee Parkins in 1725. He was called Winsley Drigers when his Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware taxes were charged to William Beckett in 1727 (listed with Robert Butcher, Robert Whud (Wood), Julius Caesar, Thomas Consellor, Jacob Miller, and Daniel Francisco) and in the Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, when his taxes were charged to Isaac Perkins in 1729 and 1730 [Kent County Assessments, Film RG 3535, reel 1, frames 354, 360, 364]. He was sued in Kent County by Hugh Durburow in August 1729, by John McDowell in May 1733 but was not found by the sheriff, and he sued the executors of Robert Wood in November 1733. The sheriff's warrant for McDowell's case read "William Grigers" [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1722-32, frame 363; 1733-1740, frames 12, 37, 73, 131; May Term 1733 case papers, executions #41-86]. He may have been the ancestor of i. Jacob, born say 1733, a "Negro" indicted in the November 1754 session of the Kent County court for stealing a dark bay gelding worth 10 pounds from John Durham on 1 October 1754 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS case files, November 1754 indictments]. ii. Drake, taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundreds, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1770 to 1787. Administration of his Sussex County will was granted to John Wiltbank on 2 September 1788. It mentioned his sister, Rhoda Hodgskin [de Valinger, Calendar of Sussex County Probate Records, 195]. iii. Rhoda, sister of Drake Driggers, married Jonas Hodgskin. iv.Richard, taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1773 [Kent County Assessments, frame 0183] and taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1779 when an X was placed next to his name [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc., Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781]. v. Luke, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1774. He was indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1775 for an unstated offense. Lydia Coursey gave 40 pound recognizance to appear to give evidence against him [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 164]. vi. Benjamin, taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777. vii. James, born say 1758, listed in the payroll of Captain Matthew Manlove's Company in the Revolutionary War on 1 October 1776, having served a month and seventeen days and paid 3 pounds, 16 shillings [Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 70-1]. viii. William5, born say 1765, a delinquent taxpayer in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1787, taxable in Dover, Kent County in 1788, and head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425]. He purchased 13 acres leading to Thomas's Chapel in Murderkill Hundred for 8 pounds on 5 December 1799 [DB F-2:234-5]. ix. Betty, married Peter Becket on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. x. Noval, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425]. xi. Mary/ Molly, purchased 15 acres called Second Chance on Gabriels Branch in Worcester County, the crop of corn, a cow, nine hogs, ten pigs, two beds and furniture, a ewe and lamb, all his household furniture and 40 shillings of paid accounts from William Jarman (of Wm) for 6 pounds on 11 September 1794 [DB P:493]. xii. Elizabeth, "Negro," had an illegitimate child by "Negro" Moses Wall in Dover Hundred in June 1785 [DSA, RG 3805, MS November 1785 Indictments]. Moses was a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1782 to 1784 [RG 3535, Levy Assessment List 1768-84, frames 542, 620].
All Fields in This Record
State Maryland
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Somerset, Sussex, Kent
Family Name Driggers
Family History Notes The Driggers family originated in Northampton County, Virginia where they were free by 1645. They spread to Maryland, Delaware, North Carolina and South Carolina during the colonial period. See the Virginia section for the entire Driggers history. Listed below are the branches of the family which lived in Maryland and Delaware. 1. Emmanuel Driggers, "Negroe," born say 1620, was the slave of Francis Pott on his plantation in Magotha Bay, Northampton County, Virginia. He was free by 27 May 1645 when he purchased a cow and calf from Pott and recorded the sale in the Northampton County court [DW 1645-51, 82]. His children were 2 i. Thomas, born about 1644. 3 ii. Devorick/ Devorax1, born say 1656. 2. Thomas Driggers, born about 1644, remained a slave in Northampton County. He married a free woman named Sarah King, daughter of "King Toney Negro." She was in Somerset County, Maryland, before 23 April 1688 when she, called "negroe Woman & wife to Thomas Griggers Negro," complained to the Somerset County court that Margaret Holder had stolen some of her goods. Peter George, "Negroe" of Wiccocomoco Hundred, posted five pounds sterling security for Sarah's appearance. The court heard testimony from Peter George, Mary George, Mary Johnson, and Sarah Driggers, Jr., and found in favor of Margaret Holder. By 14 August 1688 Sarah, Peter George, three unnamed women, and an unstated number of men petitioned the Somerset County court to stop taxing them as slaves since they were free born. The court ruled that for that year the women should be exempt, but the men should pay taxes. The court also ordered that they obtain certificates from where they formerly lived to prove that they were free born [Archives of Maryland 91:47; Judicial Record, 1687-89, 58]. In 1689 Sarah was back in Northampton County [Orders 1679-89, 463]. Their children were free because their mother was free. Two of their children who moved to Delaware and Maryland were i. Sarah1, born say 1667, raised by John and Christian Francisco until she was twenty-one years old. In 1691 she was bound to William Kenny "to go to the Southward with him" [OW 1689-98, 121, 125]. He may have been the William Kening, Jr., who sued Sarah Driger for defamation in Sussex County, Delaware Court on 3 June 1691 [Court Records 1680-99, 497]. She brought a successful suit against Edward Fadlooks(?) in Kent County, Delaware Court on 14 November 1717 [Court Dockets 1680- February 1725, fol. 119]. 4 ii. William2, born say 1682. 3. Devorick/ Devorix1 Driggers, born say 1656, was the son of Emmanuel Driggers, a slave who was freed in Northampton County, Virginia. Deverax received a bay mare from his father by a 1673 Northampton County deed [D&c 1668-80, fol.59-60]. He moved to Somerset County, Maryland, about 1677 when he was one of the headrights claimed by Stephen Cosden in his patent [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 15:433]. In 1689 he signed a Somerset County address of loyalty to King William and Queen Mary [Torrence, Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore, 349]. On 12 January 1701/2 he provided security in Somerset County court for Deborah Wildgoose who had an illegitimate child by Samuel Webb. He was living in All Hollows Parish when he and several whites were presented for being drunk on the Sabbath. He was acquitted after paying court costs [Judicial Records 1702-5, Liber G-I, 21; 1707-17, 16]. He was renting a 300 acre plantation in Bogerternorten Hundred of Somerset County in 1707 [Somerset County Rent Roll, 1707, Calvert Papers, ms. 174, MHS]. He received a cow from his sister in Somerset County on 27 July 1708 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 1 (Somerset County Livestock Marks), 160]. He died before 2 March 1708/9 when court suits against him by David Hudson and John Swann & Co. were suspended by his death [Judicial Record 1707-11, 176, 215]. His estate was valued at about 37 pounds [Inventories and Accounts, Liber 30:88]. His administrator John Jermain was sued by a number of Deverix's creditors to whom he had written promissory notes at Snow Hill, one of them his lawyer for six cases between March 1698 and March 1706. Jermain recovered 1,600 pounds of tobacco that William Godard of Wicomico had owed Deverix [Judicial Record 1706-11, 223-4, 228, 256-60, 434; 1711-13, 57]. He may have been the father of i. Devorax2 Driggers, born about 1680, was a "Molatto" Accomack County tithable in Jonathan Owen's household in 1696. He was sued by Robert Houston in Accomack County court on 7 August 1704 [Orders 1690-7, 222a, 224, 235; 1703-9, 30a]. He and (his wife?) Arendia Driggas were witnesses with Thomas Purnell to the 24 December 1720 Somerset County will of Henry Hudson, Sr., a wealthy planter [Maryland Wills 16:279; Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, 5:36]. He was taxable in Thomas Purnell's household in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in 1723 and 1724 and in Peter Beckett's household in 1725, listed in Baltimore Hundred from 1730 to 1733 [List of Taxables]. He was called a carpenter on 17 November 1730 he admitted in Somerset County court that he owed Christopher Glass for 500 pounds of tobacco and 650 pounds of beef which he had contracted for in writing on 10 November 1729. Peter Beckett provided special bail for him [Judicial Record 1730-3, 43-4]. On 16 June 1731 he purchased 75 acres in Somerset County on St. Martins River in present-day Worcester County [Land Records, Liber SH:324]. He and his wife Ann sold this land in 1734 and were renting it in 1748 [Worcester County Debt Book, 1748, 190]. They may have been the parents of an apprentice named Davarix Drigus who was valued at 6 pounds in the inventory of the estate of Thomas Parnall in June 1723 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1724-1725, 263]. He may have been the father of 4. William2 Driggus, born say 1682, was probably the son of Thomas Driggers, a Northampton County slave, and his wife Sarah King. William was called the "Maletto Servant" of Daniel Neech when he recorded his cattle mark in Northampton County court in 1698 [DW 1651-54, 30 at end of volume]. He was living in Somerset County, Maryland, in April 1708 when he was presented for carrying Mary Winslow out of the county to avoid prosecution for having an illegitimate child by Daniel Francisco. The court ordered that he, a "Mollatto," receive twenty-five lashes when he told the justices that they had no more to do with sd Woman than his Arse Edward Winslow and David Hudson were security for him [Judicial Records 1707-11, 94, 96, 102; 1713-5, 5, 26]. William signed his 7 January 1720 Somerset County will which was proved 7 May 1722. He left his 100 acre plantation called "Drigus Adventure" to his son William and mentioned unnamed children under eighteen years old and his wife, Jane. He specified that his children were to be cared for by their uncle, John Driggus of Accomack County, if his wife remarried. The inventory of his estate included a parcel of old books [Maryland Wills, Liber 17:285; Inventories 8:65]. Jane was called a "maleto widow" in 1724 when Winslow Driggus (William's son by Mary Winslow?) was taxable in her Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County household [List of Taxables]. William's children were i. William3, born about 1702. 5 ii. ?Winslow1, born say 1705. iii. ?John, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County from 1734 to 1740. iv. Sabra, born say 1722, presented by the Somerset County court on 17 November 1741 for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1740-2, 175]. 5. Winslow1 Driggers, born say 1705, was taxable in the Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of Jane Drigus in 1724 and in the household of Isabee Parkins in 1725. He was called Winsley Drigers when his Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware taxes were charged to William Beckett in 1727 (listed with Robert Butcher, Robert Whud (Wood), Julius Caesar, Thomas Consellor, Jacob Miller, and Daniel Francisco) and in the Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, when his taxes were charged to Isaac Perkins in 1729 and 1730 [Kent County Assessments, Film RG 3535, reel 1, frames 354, 360, 364]. He was sued in Kent County by Hugh Durburow in August 1729, by John McDowell in May 1733 but was not found by the sheriff, and he sued the executors of Robert Wood in November 1733. The sheriff's warrant for McDowell's case read "William Grigers" [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1722-32, frame 363; 1733-1740, frames 12, 37, 73, 131; May Term 1733 case papers, executions #41-86]. He may have been the ancestor of i. Jacob, born say 1733, a "Negro" indicted in the November 1754 session of the Kent County court for stealing a dark bay gelding worth 10 pounds from John Durham on 1 October 1754 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS case files, November 1754 indictments]. ii. Drake, taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundreds, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1770 to 1787. Administration of his Sussex County will was granted to John Wiltbank on 2 September 1788. It mentioned his sister, Rhoda Hodgskin [de Valinger, Calendar of Sussex County Probate Records, 195]. iii. Rhoda, sister of Drake Driggers, married Jonas Hodgskin. iv.Richard, taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1773 [Kent County Assessments, frame 0183] and taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1779 when an X was placed next to his name [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc., Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781]. v. Luke, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1774. He was indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1775 for an unstated offense. Lydia Coursey gave 40 pound recognizance to appear to give evidence against him [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 164]. vi. Benjamin, taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777. vii. James, born say 1758, listed in the payroll of Captain Matthew Manlove's Company in the Revolutionary War on 1 October 1776, having served a month and seventeen days and paid 3 pounds, 16 shillings [Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 70-1]. viii. William5, born say 1765, a delinquent taxpayer in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1787, taxable in Dover, Kent County in 1788, and head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425]. He purchased 13 acres leading to Thomas's Chapel in Murderkill Hundred for 8 pounds on 5 December 1799 [DB F-2:234-5]. ix. Betty, married Peter Becket on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. x. Noval, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425]. xi. Mary/ Molly, purchased 15 acres called Second Chance on Gabriels Branch in Worcester County, the crop of corn, a cow, nine hogs, ten pigs, two beds and furniture, a ewe and lamb, all his household furniture and 40 shillings of paid accounts from William Jarman (of Wm) for 6 pounds on 11 September 1794 [DB P:493]. xii. Elizabeth, "Negro," had an illegitimate child by "Negro" Moses Wall in Dover Hundred in June 1785 [DSA, RG 3805, MS November 1785 Indictments]. Moses was a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1782 to 1784 [RG 3535, Levy Assessment List 1768-84, frames 542, 620].
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Family Name Duffy
Family History Notes i. Sarah, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 25 October 1822: descendant of Susan Dove who was a white woman ... bright yellow Complexion ... about forty years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 11].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Duffy
Family History Notes i. Sarah, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 25 October 1822: descendant of Susan Dove who was a white woman ... bright yellow Complexion ... about forty years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 11].
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Family Name Dutton
Family History Notes Members of the Dutton family in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia were 1 i. Mary, born say 1740. 2 ii. Isaac, born say 1742. iii. Stephen1, born say 1744, had an illegitimate child by Easly Wright, a spinster of Coventry Parish, Somerset County, before June 1767 [Judicial Record 1766-7, 152]. 3 iv. David1, born say 1745. v. Stephen3, born about 1769, an eight-year-old "negro" bound apprentice in Harford County to Benjamin Richardson in October 1777 [Maryland Historical Society Bulletin, vol. 35, no.3]. vi. Guy, born before 1776, head of a Harford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Eleanor, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:251]. viii. Levin, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 4 June 1821: born free ... dark brown complexion ... in the twenty eighth year of his age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 1-2]. 1. Mary Dutton, born say 1740, was a "Mulatto" who registered the 13 June 1759 birth of her daughter Leah and the 18 August 1762 birth of her son Stephen in Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, III:43, 46]. She was a spinster of Coventry Parish on 16 June 1767 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had an illegitimate child (by an unnamed free person) and was fined three pounds [Judicial Record 1766-7, 152]. She was the mother of i. Leah, born 13 June 1759. ii. Stephen2, born 18 August 1762. He was taxable on 100 acres in Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.68], head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391], 7 in 1810 [DE:325], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:396]. iii. ?David3, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:307] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:414]. iv. ?Hanabel, born before 1776, head of a Nanticoke, Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:224]. 2. Isaac Dutton, born say 1742, was bound as an apprentice blacksmith in Somerset County in 1759 [Judicial Record 1757-61, 225]. He married Elizabeth Hill, "(both free Mulattoes)," on 13 October 1763 in Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 47]. They may have been the parents of i. David2, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:321]. 3. David1 Dutton, born say 1745, married Bethia Bibbons on 17 September 1766 at Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 49]. He sued Benjamin Gilliss (blacksmith) for seven pounds, four shillings in Somerset County court on 19 November 1771 [Judicial Record 1769-72, 268]. He was a "free Mulatto" who purchased a total of 91 acres in 1772 and 1775 in the part of Somerset County which later became Wicomico County, Maryland. He was taxable on 50 acres, called "Crooked Chance," and 40 acres, called "Poor Chance," in Rewastico, Somerset County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.40]. David died in 1798 not long after purchasing a larger tract of land in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County [Land Records Liber F-2, 395; Liber O-32, 206]. David and Bethia were the parents of i. Nancy, born 7 August 1768, "daughter of David and Bethier," registered in Stepney Parish. ii. Suckey, born 14 March 1771, "daughter of David and Bethyer," registered in Stepney Parish. iii. Betheyer, born 20 January 1774, "daughter of David and Betheyer," registered in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 49, 50, 52, 53].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Dutton
Family History Notes Members of the Dutton family in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia were 1 i. Mary, born say 1740. 2 ii. Isaac, born say 1742. iii. Stephen1, born say 1744, had an illegitimate child by Easly Wright, a spinster of Coventry Parish, Somerset County, before June 1767 [Judicial Record 1766-7, 152]. 3 iv. David1, born say 1745. v. Stephen3, born about 1769, an eight-year-old "negro" bound apprentice in Harford County to Benjamin Richardson in October 1777 [Maryland Historical Society Bulletin, vol. 35, no.3]. vi. Guy, born before 1776, head of a Harford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Eleanor, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:251]. viii. Levin, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 4 June 1821: born free ... dark brown complexion ... in the twenty eighth year of his age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 1-2]. 1. Mary Dutton, born say 1740, was a "Mulatto" who registered the 13 June 1759 birth of her daughter Leah and the 18 August 1762 birth of her son Stephen in Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, III:43, 46]. She was a spinster of Coventry Parish on 16 June 1767 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had an illegitimate child (by an unnamed free person) and was fined three pounds [Judicial Record 1766-7, 152]. She was the mother of i. Leah, born 13 June 1759. ii. Stephen2, born 18 August 1762. He was taxable on 100 acres in Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.68], head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391], 7 in 1810 [DE:325], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:396]. iii. ?David3, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:307] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:414]. iv. ?Hanabel, born before 1776, head of a Nanticoke, Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:224]. 2. Isaac Dutton, born say 1742, was bound as an apprentice blacksmith in Somerset County in 1759 [Judicial Record 1757-61, 225]. He married Elizabeth Hill, "(both free Mulattoes)," on 13 October 1763 in Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 47]. They may have been the parents of i. David2, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:321]. 3. David1 Dutton, born say 1745, married Bethia Bibbons on 17 September 1766 at Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 49]. He sued Benjamin Gilliss (blacksmith) for seven pounds, four shillings in Somerset County court on 19 November 1771 [Judicial Record 1769-72, 268]. He was a "free Mulatto" who purchased a total of 91 acres in 1772 and 1775 in the part of Somerset County which later became Wicomico County, Maryland. He was taxable on 50 acres, called "Crooked Chance," and 40 acres, called "Poor Chance," in Rewastico, Somerset County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.40]. David died in 1798 not long after purchasing a larger tract of land in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County [Land Records Liber F-2, 395; Liber O-32, 206]. David and Bethia were the parents of i. Nancy, born 7 August 1768, "daughter of David and Bethier," registered in Stepney Parish. ii. Suckey, born 14 March 1771, "daughter of David and Bethyer," registered in Stepney Parish. iii. Betheyer, born 20 January 1774, "daughter of David and Betheyer," registered in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 49, 50, 52, 53].
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Family Name Evans
Family History Notes 1. Elizabeth Dennis, alias Evans, born say 1687, was convicted of having a "Mullattoe" child by the Anne Arundel County court in November 1707. She charged the child to a white man named Jeremiah Connelly, but he was acquitted and she was ordered to serve her mistress, Madam Biggs, twelve months for the trouble of her house. She confessed to having another child in August 1709 which she admitted was fathered by Mrs. Biggs' "Negroe Dick." She had another "Malato" child who was about five weeks old in November 1711 when he was sold to James Carroll to serve until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Records 1707-8, 649-50; 1708-12, 75, 374, 411]. She may have been the ancestor of 2 i. Hannah, born say 1760. ii. Mary Evens, head of a Montgomery County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:914]. 2. Hannah Evans, born say 1760, was born free in Dorchester County. She was head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:669]. She was the mother of i. Lucy Cornish, born about 1781, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 November 1826: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Hannah Evans who was also born free, aged about 45 years. ii. James, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 August 1826: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of Hannah Evans who was also born free, aged about 28 years. iii. Hooper, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 19 June 1824: chesnut colour ... son of Hannah Evans, who was born free, about 22 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 50, 55].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties
Family Name Evans
Family History Notes 1. Elizabeth Dennis, alias Evans, born say 1687, was convicted of having a "Mullattoe" child by the Anne Arundel County court in November 1707. She charged the child to a white man named Jeremiah Connelly, but he was acquitted and she was ordered to serve her mistress, Madam Biggs, twelve months for the trouble of her house. She confessed to having another child in August 1709 which she admitted was fathered by Mrs. Biggs' "Negroe Dick." She had another "Malato" child who was about five weeks old in November 1711 when he was sold to James Carroll to serve until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Records 1707-8, 649-50; 1708-12, 75, 374, 411]. She may have been the ancestor of 2 i. Hannah, born say 1760. ii. Mary Evens, head of a Montgomery County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:914]. 2. Hannah Evans, born say 1760, was born free in Dorchester County. She was head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:669]. She was the mother of i. Lucy Cornish, born about 1781, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 November 1826: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Hannah Evans who was also born free, aged about 45 years. ii. James, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 August 1826: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of Hannah Evans who was also born free, aged about 28 years. iii. Hooper, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 19 June 1824: chesnut colour ... son of Hannah Evans, who was born free, about 22 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 50, 55].
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Family Name Farmer
Family History Notes 1. William1 Farmer, born say 1711, was a "Mallato" taxable in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of widow Elizabeth Davis from 1727 to 1733, taxable in Daniel Wells' Bogerternorton household in 1734 and in the Pocomoke Hundred household of Isaac Morris in 1738 [List of Taxables]. He may have been the William Farmer who was sued by Archibald Smith in Kent County, Delaware court but not found by the sheriff in August 1727 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1722-1732, frames 170, 171] and he may have been the William Farmer who was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1768 and in Dover Hundred in 1772 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 151, 159] and he may have been the father of i. John1, born say 1740. ii. William2, born say 1745. 2. John1 Farmer, born say 1740, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1768 and in Dover Hundred from 1772 to 1779 when he was listed without assessed tax [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 151, 159, 222, 303, 345, 374]. He died before 29 February 1785 when administration on his estate was granted to Thomas Nixon, Esq., and James McClement [RG 3545, roll 74]. He may have been the father of i. John, born say 1761, a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, in 1782 and taxable there in 1783 and 1784, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1787 and 1788, taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1789 and 1791, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1792 and 1794, a "Mulatoe" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 550, 595, 628; 1785-96, frames 71, 74, 106, 147; 230, 267, 337; 1797-8, frame 473, 483], head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:105]. ii. Nancy, head of a Caroline County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:188]. iii. Adam, born say 1777, a "Mulatto" or "Negro" single man, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 and 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-98, frames 473, 482; 1800-2, frame 326]. He married Betty Buck, 16 October 1805 Sussex County bond, John Calloway bondsman [DSA, Marriage Records 16:36]. 3. William2 Farmer, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1768, called William Farmer, Jr. and taxable in Murderkill Hundred from 1770 to 1786, listed as a "free Negro" in 1782 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 80, 188, 281, 300, 345, 374, 457, 508, 544, 550, 595, 628; 1785-1796, frames 11, 52]. He was a "Negro" living on 100 acres of land belonging to Vincent Lockerman, Jr., deceased, on 13 December 1793 when the annual rent of the land was valued at 22 pounds [Brewer, Kent County Guardian Accounts, Houston to McBride (v.4), 147]. He was head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:111]. He may have been the father of i. William3, born say 1767, called Wm Farmer Junr when he was taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1786, in Little Creek Hundred in 1787 and 1788, and in Murderkill Hundred in 1789, perhaps the William Farmer who was taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1791, a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798, taxable in Mispillion Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 52, 74, 106, 147, 230; 1797-8, frames 473, 478]. Their descendants in Delaware were i. Abel, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. ii. Gilbert, born 1794-1806, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:24].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Worcester, Kent
Family Name Farmer
Family History Notes 1. William1 Farmer, born say 1711, was a "Mallato" taxable in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of widow Elizabeth Davis from 1727 to 1733, taxable in Daniel Wells' Bogerternorton household in 1734 and in the Pocomoke Hundred household of Isaac Morris in 1738 [List of Taxables]. He may have been the William Farmer who was sued by Archibald Smith in Kent County, Delaware court but not found by the sheriff in August 1727 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1722-1732, frames 170, 171] and he may have been the William Farmer who was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1768 and in Dover Hundred in 1772 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 151, 159] and he may have been the father of i. John1, born say 1740. ii. William2, born say 1745. 2. John1 Farmer, born say 1740, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1768 and in Dover Hundred from 1772 to 1779 when he was listed without assessed tax [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 151, 159, 222, 303, 345, 374]. He died before 29 February 1785 when administration on his estate was granted to Thomas Nixon, Esq., and James McClement [RG 3545, roll 74]. He may have been the father of i. John, born say 1761, a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, in 1782 and taxable there in 1783 and 1784, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1787 and 1788, taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1789 and 1791, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1792 and 1794, a "Mulatoe" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 550, 595, 628; 1785-96, frames 71, 74, 106, 147; 230, 267, 337; 1797-8, frame 473, 483], head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:105]. ii. Nancy, head of a Caroline County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:188]. iii. Adam, born say 1777, a "Mulatto" or "Negro" single man, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 and 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-98, frames 473, 482; 1800-2, frame 326]. He married Betty Buck, 16 October 1805 Sussex County bond, John Calloway bondsman [DSA, Marriage Records 16:36]. 3. William2 Farmer, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1768, called William Farmer, Jr. and taxable in Murderkill Hundred from 1770 to 1786, listed as a "free Negro" in 1782 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 80, 188, 281, 300, 345, 374, 457, 508, 544, 550, 595, 628; 1785-1796, frames 11, 52]. He was a "Negro" living on 100 acres of land belonging to Vincent Lockerman, Jr., deceased, on 13 December 1793 when the annual rent of the land was valued at 22 pounds [Brewer, Kent County Guardian Accounts, Houston to McBride (v.4), 147]. He was head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:111]. He may have been the father of i. William3, born say 1767, called Wm Farmer Junr when he was taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1786, in Little Creek Hundred in 1787 and 1788, and in Murderkill Hundred in 1789, perhaps the William Farmer who was taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1791, a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798, taxable in Mispillion Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 52, 74, 106, 147, 230; 1797-8, frames 473, 478]. Their descendants in Delaware were i. Abel, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. ii. Gilbert, born 1794-1806, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:24].
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Family Name Game
Family History Notes 1. Sambo Game, born say 1670, was the slave of Peter Douty of Somerset County. While still a slave, Sambo may have had a child by a white woman named Mauldlin Magee. Her daughter Fortune Game/ Magee was the servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered her to serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. Sambo and his wife Betty were "Negro" slaves freed by Peter Douty's 1709 Somerset County will. Douty also allowed them the use of his 150 acre plantation, called Paris, in the Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County during their lives [Wills Liber 5:142; Land Records Liber CD:416]. They were free by 1713 when they petitioned the Somerset County court to allow Betty to be tax free [Liber AC:17]. He was called "Sambo Gam a Negro" when he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings by the executor of Peter Douty's estate [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 36B, 245]. He was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, from 1724 to 1733, listed in a household adjoining Fortune Game in 1728. "Negro" Grace, a taxable in his household in 1724 and 1727, may have been his slave; and Robert Game, a taxable in his household in 1728, was probably his son. Patrick Makeala and Samuel Clark, who were probably white, were taxables in his household in 1727 [List of Taxables, 1724-33]. He probably died before 1735 when Betty paid quit rents on their land [Somerset County Debt Book 1734, 79; 1735, 47 cited by Davidson, Free Blacks on the lower Eastern Shore]. Sambo may have been the father of 2 i. Fortune Magee, born say 1687. 3 ii. Robert, born say 1710. 4 iii. Harry, born say 1720. 2. Fortune Game, born say 1687, was called Fortune Magee, the servant of Mrs. Mary Day, on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County, Maryland who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. In 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251; 1711-3, 220]. She was called Fortune Game, a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household from 1728 to 1735, with Betty Game in 1728 and 1731, and with Betty and Rose Game in 1733. She was the mother of 5 i. Rose, born March 1703. 6 ii. Sue Magee, born in April 1705. 7 iii. Perlina, born in April 1707. 8 iv. ?Betty, born say 1712. vi. ?Sarah Fortune, born say 1715. See the Fortune family history. v. ?Anville, born say 1722, taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1738 and 1740 and taxable in Isaac Bebbings' Nanticoke Hundred household in 1744. 3. Robert Game, born say 1710, was taxable in the Somerset County household of Sambo Game in 1728. He was head of his own Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1733 with (his wife?) Ellender Game until 1749 and taxable by himself in 1750. He was in Murderkill Hundred, Delaware, when he made his September 1782 will, proved 17 October 1782. He left his wife Elizabeth his largest bed which was to go to her daughter Mary Lanthorn after her death and left his wife a cow which was to go to her daughter and Sarah Lanthorn (Lantern) after her death. His inventory included two mares, a colt and corn in the field [RG 3545, roll 82, frame 425; DB L-1, fol. 267-8]. Robert may have been the father of i. Levin1, born say 1740, convicted of murder in May 1767. Betty and Sarah Game/ Tompson/ Fortune testified against him. The Governor issued a death warrant for him on 13 June 1767 [Provincial Court Judgments, May Term 1767, 648-52; Archives of Maryland 32:200]. ii. Ephraim1, taxable in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. He was a recruit from Dorchester County in the Revolutionary War on 25 July 1780 [Archives of Maryland 18:339]. iii. Henry2, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free' in 1800 [MD:340]. 4. Harry1 Game, born say 1720, was probably identical to "Harry Negro," a taxable slave in the Nanticoke Hundred household of Priscilla Dashiell in 1738. He may have been related to Sambo Game since Priscilla Dashiell was one of Peter Douty's heirs [Land Records, Liber A-2, 150]. He was probably the "negro physician," "Doctor Harrey," whose services were advertised in the 7 November 1750 issue of the Maryland Gazette. He, called Henry (Doctor) Game, and his wife Rose were free before 10 August 1751 when they registered the birth of their son Daniel at Stepney Parish, Somerset County. They were taxable in Somerset County in 1752. In 1757 Harry purchased for 70 pounds a 150 acre plantation called Covington's Choice in Wicomico Hundred and petitioned the Somerset County court to have his slave, Tite, tax exempt [Land Records, Liber B:173; Judicial Records 1757-61, 18]. Harry left a will in 1781 naming his sons, Daniel and Jeremiah [Wills, Liber EB 1:144]. His children were i. Daniel, born 10 August 1751 in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. He sued Stephen Adams in 1785 in Somerset County for 12 pounds for "attending, curing and healing a negro woman slave of said Stephen of divers diseases and infirmities" [Judicial Record 1786-88, 87]. ii. Bridget, daughter of Doctor Henry and Rose Game, born 20 February 1754 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. iii. Jeremiah, born say 1758, taxable on 60 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County in 1783. iv. ?Samuel, taxable on 55 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.42]. 5. Ross/ Rose Game, born in March 1703, child of Fortune Game, a taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1733. She owed 9 pounds, 11 shillings to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Her children, whose births were registered in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, were i. Joe Magee, a "molatto" bound by Rose Magee to Edward Rownds on 19 March 1722/3 [Judicial Record 1723-5, 3]. ii. Stephen Magee, born 25 June 1737, alias Game of Mulatto Rose or Rose Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 143] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790. iii. Isaac1 Magee Game, born 25 June 1741, son of Mullato Rose or Rose Game alias Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He owed a shilling to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:36-44]. He may have been identical to Sax Game, a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1759. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777. 6. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when the births of her "mulatto" children, Belindor, Davey, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were registered at Stepney Parish. Her children were i. ?Ned, born say 1737, a "Mullatto" (no last name) with eleven months to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. ii. Belindor Magee, born September 1741, "otherwise Belinder Game dau of Mollatto Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." She was probably the "Mullatto" Belinda listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with fourteen years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. She may have been identical to "Blinda" (no last name) who was a taxable with Ephraim Game and James Right in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. iii. Davey Magee, born 14 March 1745, "otherwise Davey Game son of mollato Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." He was probably the "Mullatto" David listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with sixteen and one half years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. iv. Janney Magee, born 13 October 1746, "otherwise Janney Game son of mollato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." v. James Magee, born 28 July 1750, "otherwise James Game son of mullato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." vi. Nelly Magee, born 9 _ , 1754, alias Game (dau of Mullato Sue) [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:126; 3:42]. 7. Perlina Game, born in April 1707, was five years old "next April" in March 1712 when she was bound apprentice in Somerset County court. She was probably identical to "Ner Game," a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1734 and to Polina Gam who was a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household with Sarah Gam in 1759. She may have been the mother of 9 i. Sarah, born say 1730. 8. Betty Game, born say 1712, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Fortune Game from 1728 to 1731. She had an illegitimate child in Stepney Parish on 1 September 1732 for which she received ten lashes. Stephen Winwright was her security for payment of the court costs [Judicial Record 1730-3, 262-3]. She was identical to Betty Fortune who was a taxable head of household in Nanticoke Hundred with (her daughter?) Fortune Fortune in 1757. On 22 October 1754 Betty Game purchased 50 acres called Georges Pleasure on the southside of the Nanticoke River in Somerset County from Day Scott for 5 pounds, and on 5 December 1772 Betty sold this land for 33 pounds [DB B:42-3; O:26-7]. By his 14 June 1753 Somerset County will, proved 17 August 1757, George Day Scott left Betty Fortune the 50 acre tract where she was then living if she paid the balance due [WB 1756-61, 58]. Bess Fortune owed 9 shillings to the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Betty was probably one of "Two Women of a Dark Complection Live a the Head of Tippin(?)" listed by the constable as having refused to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women in 1743. The constable reported further that "they are full as Dark as most Mallatos. They are of the Breed of old fortune and Robt. Game" [List of Taxables, 1743]. She was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777 and 1790. She may have been the mother of i. George1 Game, born say 1733, taxable in Betty Game's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1749. ii. "Negro Patience Thomson," a taxable in Betty Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1756, called Patience Game in 1783, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred [MSA S1161-9-10, p.45]. iii. ?Fortune Fortune, born say 1740, taxable in Betty Fortune's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1757. iv. Levin2, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791. v. John Game, taxable in Indian River, Sussex County in 1789, called a "Mulato" in the list of delinquents: "not Settled anywhere," and taxable there in 1790 and 1791. 9. Sarah Game, born say 1730, was taxable in Perlina Game's Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1759. She was living in Stepney Parish in March 1762 when she confessed to having a child by by an unnamed "Negro slave." The court sold her son Ephraim to her master George Scott for thirty-one years and ordered her master to return her to court at the completion of her indenture so she could be sold for seven years. In June 1762 Scott was the highest bidder for her servitude at 3,150 Pounds [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b, 151]. She was the mother of a "Melatto" son Lovewell who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Indian River Hundred in May 1770 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex County, 100]. She had another illegitimate child in Stepney Parish before 15 March 1768 and paid a double fine to avoid naming the father [Judicial Records 1767-9, 70, 146]. She was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:309] and 1 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408].She was the mother of i. Ephraim2, born in January 1762. ii. Lovewell, baptized in May 1770. Other Delaware Game descendants were i. George2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. He married Leah Noble, 6 December 1799 Worcester County, Maryland bond. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. Leah may have been related to Mark Noble, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17]. George Game "of Geo." (age 25) and Spenser Game "of Geo." (age 25) emigrated to Liberia from Somerset County aboard the ship Lafayette in 1832 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390]. ii. Isaac2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. iii. Levin3, born 1776-1794, sold (signing) 50 acres called Pembertons Goodwill in Somerset County on 14 February 1818 for $50 [DB JD-3:336-7]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:412], obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 27 May 1825: born free in Somerset County ... bright Mollatto Complexion ... about thirty nine years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 48].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Game
Family History Notes 1. Sambo Game, born say 1670, was the slave of Peter Douty of Somerset County. While still a slave, Sambo may have had a child by a white woman named Mauldlin Magee. Her daughter Fortune Game/ Magee was the servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered her to serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. Sambo and his wife Betty were "Negro" slaves freed by Peter Douty's 1709 Somerset County will. Douty also allowed them the use of his 150 acre plantation, called Paris, in the Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County during their lives [Wills Liber 5:142; Land Records Liber CD:416]. They were free by 1713 when they petitioned the Somerset County court to allow Betty to be tax free [Liber AC:17]. He was called "Sambo Gam a Negro" when he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings by the executor of Peter Douty's estate [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 36B, 245]. He was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, from 1724 to 1733, listed in a household adjoining Fortune Game in 1728. "Negro" Grace, a taxable in his household in 1724 and 1727, may have been his slave; and Robert Game, a taxable in his household in 1728, was probably his son. Patrick Makeala and Samuel Clark, who were probably white, were taxables in his household in 1727 [List of Taxables, 1724-33]. He probably died before 1735 when Betty paid quit rents on their land [Somerset County Debt Book 1734, 79; 1735, 47 cited by Davidson, Free Blacks on the lower Eastern Shore]. Sambo may have been the father of 2 i. Fortune Magee, born say 1687. 3 ii. Robert, born say 1710. 4 iii. Harry, born say 1720. 2. Fortune Game, born say 1687, was called Fortune Magee, the servant of Mrs. Mary Day, on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County, Maryland who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. In 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251; 1711-3, 220]. She was called Fortune Game, a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household from 1728 to 1735, with Betty Game in 1728 and 1731, and with Betty and Rose Game in 1733. She was the mother of 5 i. Rose, born March 1703. 6 ii. Sue Magee, born in April 1705. 7 iii. Perlina, born in April 1707. 8 iv. ?Betty, born say 1712. vi. ?Sarah Fortune, born say 1715. See the Fortune family history. v. ?Anville, born say 1722, taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1738 and 1740 and taxable in Isaac Bebbings' Nanticoke Hundred household in 1744. 3. Robert Game, born say 1710, was taxable in the Somerset County household of Sambo Game in 1728. He was head of his own Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1733 with (his wife?) Ellender Game until 1749 and taxable by himself in 1750. He was in Murderkill Hundred, Delaware, when he made his September 1782 will, proved 17 October 1782. He left his wife Elizabeth his largest bed which was to go to her daughter Mary Lanthorn after her death and left his wife a cow which was to go to her daughter and Sarah Lanthorn (Lantern) after her death. His inventory included two mares, a colt and corn in the field [RG 3545, roll 82, frame 425; DB L-1, fol. 267-8]. Robert may have been the father of i. Levin1, born say 1740, convicted of murder in May 1767. Betty and Sarah Game/ Tompson/ Fortune testified against him. The Governor issued a death warrant for him on 13 June 1767 [Provincial Court Judgments, May Term 1767, 648-52; Archives of Maryland 32:200]. ii. Ephraim1, taxable in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. He was a recruit from Dorchester County in the Revolutionary War on 25 July 1780 [Archives of Maryland 18:339]. iii. Henry2, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free' in 1800 [MD:340]. 4. Harry1 Game, born say 1720, was probably identical to "Harry Negro," a taxable slave in the Nanticoke Hundred household of Priscilla Dashiell in 1738. He may have been related to Sambo Game since Priscilla Dashiell was one of Peter Douty's heirs [Land Records, Liber A-2, 150]. He was probably the "negro physician," "Doctor Harrey," whose services were advertised in the 7 November 1750 issue of the Maryland Gazette. He, called Henry (Doctor) Game, and his wife Rose were free before 10 August 1751 when they registered the birth of their son Daniel at Stepney Parish, Somerset County. They were taxable in Somerset County in 1752. In 1757 Harry purchased for 70 pounds a 150 acre plantation called Covington's Choice in Wicomico Hundred and petitioned the Somerset County court to have his slave, Tite, tax exempt [Land Records, Liber B:173; Judicial Records 1757-61, 18]. Harry left a will in 1781 naming his sons, Daniel and Jeremiah [Wills, Liber EB 1:144]. His children were i. Daniel, born 10 August 1751 in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. He sued Stephen Adams in 1785 in Somerset County for 12 pounds for "attending, curing and healing a negro woman slave of said Stephen of divers diseases and infirmities" [Judicial Record 1786-88, 87]. ii. Bridget, daughter of Doctor Henry and Rose Game, born 20 February 1754 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. iii. Jeremiah, born say 1758, taxable on 60 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County in 1783. iv. ?Samuel, taxable on 55 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.42]. 5. Ross/ Rose Game, born in March 1703, child of Fortune Game, a taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1733. She owed 9 pounds, 11 shillings to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Her children, whose births were registered in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, were i. Joe Magee, a "molatto" bound by Rose Magee to Edward Rownds on 19 March 1722/3 [Judicial Record 1723-5, 3]. ii. Stephen Magee, born 25 June 1737, alias Game of Mulatto Rose or Rose Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 143] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790. iii. Isaac1 Magee Game, born 25 June 1741, son of Mullato Rose or Rose Game alias Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He owed a shilling to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:36-44]. He may have been identical to Sax Game, a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1759. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777. 6. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when the births of her "mulatto" children, Belindor, Davey, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were registered at Stepney Parish. Her children were i. ?Ned, born say 1737, a "Mullatto" (no last name) with eleven months to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. ii. Belindor Magee, born September 1741, "otherwise Belinder Game dau of Mollatto Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." She was probably the "Mullatto" Belinda listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with fourteen years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. She may have been identical to "Blinda" (no last name) who was a taxable with Ephraim Game and James Right in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. iii. Davey Magee, born 14 March 1745, "otherwise Davey Game son of mollato Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." He was probably the "Mullatto" David listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with sixteen and one half years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. iv. Janney Magee, born 13 October 1746, "otherwise Janney Game son of mollato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." v. James Magee, born 28 July 1750, "otherwise James Game son of mullato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." vi. Nelly Magee, born 9 _ , 1754, alias Game (dau of Mullato Sue) [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:126; 3:42]. 7. Perlina Game, born in April 1707, was five years old "next April" in March 1712 when she was bound apprentice in Somerset County court. She was probably identical to "Ner Game," a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1734 and to Polina Gam who was a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household with Sarah Gam in 1759. She may have been the mother of 9 i. Sarah, born say 1730. 8. Betty Game, born say 1712, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Fortune Game from 1728 to 1731. She had an illegitimate child in Stepney Parish on 1 September 1732 for which she received ten lashes. Stephen Winwright was her security for payment of the court costs [Judicial Record 1730-3, 262-3]. She was identical to Betty Fortune who was a taxable head of household in Nanticoke Hundred with (her daughter?) Fortune Fortune in 1757. On 22 October 1754 Betty Game purchased 50 acres called Georges Pleasure on the southside of the Nanticoke River in Somerset County from Day Scott for 5 pounds, and on 5 December 1772 Betty sold this land for 33 pounds [DB B:42-3; O:26-7]. By his 14 June 1753 Somerset County will, proved 17 August 1757, George Day Scott left Betty Fortune the 50 acre tract where she was then living if she paid the balance due [WB 1756-61, 58]. Bess Fortune owed 9 shillings to the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Betty was probably one of "Two Women of a Dark Complection Live a the Head of Tippin(?)" listed by the constable as having refused to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women in 1743. The constable reported further that "they are full as Dark as most Mallatos. They are of the Breed of old fortune and Robt. Game" [List of Taxables, 1743]. She was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777 and 1790. She may have been the mother of i. George1 Game, born say 1733, taxable in Betty Game's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1749. ii. "Negro Patience Thomson," a taxable in Betty Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1756, called Patience Game in 1783, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred [MSA S1161-9-10, p.45]. iii. ?Fortune Fortune, born say 1740, taxable in Betty Fortune's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1757. iv. Levin2, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791. v. John Game, taxable in Indian River, Sussex County in 1789, called a "Mulato" in the list of delinquents: "not Settled anywhere," and taxable there in 1790 and 1791. 9. Sarah Game, born say 1730, was taxable in Perlina Game's Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1759. She was living in Stepney Parish in March 1762 when she confessed to having a child by by an unnamed "Negro slave." The court sold her son Ephraim to her master George Scott for thirty-one years and ordered her master to return her to court at the completion of her indenture so she could be sold for seven years. In June 1762 Scott was the highest bidder for her servitude at 3,150 Pounds [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b, 151]. She was the mother of a "Melatto" son Lovewell who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Indian River Hundred in May 1770 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex County, 100]. She had another illegitimate child in Stepney Parish before 15 March 1768 and paid a double fine to avoid naming the father [Judicial Records 1767-9, 70, 146]. She was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:309] and 1 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408].She was the mother of i. Ephraim2, born in January 1762. ii. Lovewell, baptized in May 1770. Other Delaware Game descendants were i. George2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. He married Leah Noble, 6 December 1799 Worcester County, Maryland bond. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. Leah may have been related to Mark Noble, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17]. George Game "of Geo." (age 25) and Spenser Game "of Geo." (age 25) emigrated to Liberia from Somerset County aboard the ship Lafayette in 1832 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390]. ii. Isaac2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. iii. Levin3, born 1776-1794, sold (signing) 50 acres called Pembertons Goodwill in Somerset County on 14 February 1818 for $50 [DB JD-3:336-7]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:412], obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 27 May 1825: born free in Somerset County ... bright Mollatto Complexion ... about thirty nine years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 48].
Additional Notes
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Family Name Francisco/Sisco
Family History Notes 1. John1 Francisco, born perhaps 1630, was the slave of Stephen Charlton for whom Charlton claimed a headright in Northampton County, Virginia, in August 1647 [DW 1645-51, 97 by Deal, Race and Class]. In July 1648 Charlton made a deed of manumission to free him ten years later in November 1658: and then the said Negro is to bee a free man. He was called "Black Jack" in Charlton's October 1654 will by which he received his freedom. Charlton also agreed to free John's wife, Christian, a "Negro woman," three years after his death or within six months if she paid 2,500 pounds of tobacco [DW 1645-51, 150-2; 1654-55, fol.57]. John and Christian were tithable in their own household in Northampton County from 1665 to 1671. Grace Susanna (Sebastian Cane's wife?) was in their household in 1667. In 1668 the court agreed to have the "Negro" child of Thomas Driggers, then living with him, bound to him until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, fol.14, p.42, 53, fol.54, fol.115]. He was called "John Francisco Negroe" on 7 July 1685 when the Accomack County court ordered him to pay his debt of 5,090 pounds of tobacco to Colonel William Kendall [W&c 1682-97, 66a]. He was taxable in Accomack County from 1674 to 1695, called a "negro" in 1676 and 1686. In 1684 one of his three tithables was identified as his unnamed wife [Orders 1676-78, 33, 57; 1678-82, 18, 99; W&c 1682-97, 191, 258; Nottingham, Accomack Tithables, 12, 16, 18, 19, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 31, 33, 35, 37, 40, 42, 44, 47, 50, 52, 54, 60]. John was probably the ancestor of 2 i. Daniel1, born say 1680. 3 ii. Elizabeth, born say 1695. iii. Thomas1 Frisco, born say 1700, a Northampton County taxable with Ann Frisco in 1724 and tithable without Ann in Nathaniel Anders' household in 1725 [L.P. 1724, 1725]. He may have been identical to Thomas2 Sisco of Kent County, Delaware. 2. Daniel1 Francisco, born say 1680, was sued for debt in Northampton County, Virginia, on 28 November 1706. The case was dismissed because neither part appeared [Orders, Wills, Etc., 1698-1710, 308]. Daniel was probably in company with William Driggers because Daniel had a child by Mary Winslow in Somerset County sometime in 1708, and William Driggers helped him by carrying her out of county to avoid prosecution. Daniel was called a Somerset County planter when he admitted to being the father of Mary's child when he appeared in court seven years later in March 1713/4. He was probably living with Elizabeth Francisco, "of Somerset County," who was sued for a debt of 500 pounds of tobacco on 5 June 1712 by Samuel Daughty with whom she had contracted to pay by 7 May 1712 at Pocomoke. On 7 August 1712 her bail was forfeited to pay the debt [Judicial Records 1707-11, 94-6, 103; 1711-13, 167, 225; 1713-5, 5, 26]. Daniel was in Accomack County on 6 July 1715 when the court ordered that he, John Smith, John Martiall, and Richard Rowle/ Rowlin be summoned to the next court for disobeying Constable Hill Drummond while he was trying to break up a fight. The other parties were fined when they appeared at the next court on 4 October, but there was no further mention of Daniel [Orders 1714-17, 10a, 11]. He was sued for debt by Evan Jones in Kent County, Delaware court in November 1724, by Nicholas Greenway in May 1725, by Jonathan Griffin in May 1731 and Nicholas Nixon for a 16 pound debt in August 1731 [RG 3815.031, Dockets 1722-1732, frames 83, 84, 492, 498, 519, 593 ; MS case papers]. He was listed in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware tax assessments from 1727 to 1733 (listed near Winslow Drigers, Thomas Comsoloe, Julius Caesar, William Beckett, and Jacob Miller in 1727) [RG 3535, Assessments 1726-42, frames 346, 352, 358, 363, 369], apparently identical to David Francisco who died before 22 September 1732 when the inventory of his Kent County, Delaware estate was taken. (This inventory is not the original, but a copy made in 1752. Perhaps the clerk wrote David for Daniel). Daniel may have married the daughter of Thomas Consellor who mentioned his daughter Elizabeth Francisco in his 26 September 1739 Kent County will. "Elisabeth Siscom" was head of a household in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1738, taxable on her son Thomas. Doctor Ridgely was allowed 7 pounds for her maintenance by the Kent County levy court on 18 December 1766 [Kent Count Levy List, 1727-67, frame 531]. Daniel and Elizabeth may have been the parents of 4 i. Daniel2, born say 1700. ii. Tabitha, born say 1705, sued by Jacob Miller in Kent County court but withdrawn in August 1731 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1722-1732, frame 509]. 5 iii. Thomas2, born say 1715. 6 iv. John2, born say 1723. v. Rebecca, sued in Kent County court in August 1748 by John Clayton in a case decided out of court [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 423]. 3. Elizabeth Francisco, born say 1695, was a "negro" who bound out her daughter, Rachel, to Robert Nottingham in Northampton County on 17 March 1717/18 [Orders 1716-18, 84]. She bound out her daughter, Sabra, "a Negro Child" to Abraham Bowker on 18 August 1719 [Orders 1719-22, 31]. On 13 September 1722 she was accused of murdering her child but was acquitted of the charge [Orders 1719-22, 183]. In November 1722 Bowker sued her to recover his costs for looking after her during her childbirth. She may have left the county since Ralph Pigot forfeited the bail he posted for her appearance in court to answer Bowker [Milhalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 37, 42]. Her children were 7 i. Rachel1, born perhaps 1715. ii. Sabra, born perhaps 1717. 4. Daniel2 Francisco, born say 1700, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1748, listed next to John Francisco [Assessments 1743-48 (RG 3535-2), frame 51], but not listed in later assessments, so he may have been the brother of John Francisco who petitioned the Kent County Orphans Court on 26 February 1756 stating that his brother had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife Catherine, leaving an infant. Perhaps Daniel's widow was Ruth Fransisscoe who was being maintained by James Starling on 18 November 1766 when the Kent County levy court allowed him 10 pounds for her maintenance [Levy List 1727-67, frame 530], and perhaps he was the father of 8 i. Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745. 5. Thomas2 Francisco, born say 1715, was taxable in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of his mother Elisabeth Siscom in 1738 and taxable in his own household from 1740 to 1745. He died before 16 July 1748 when his widow Patience Sisco was granted administration on his Kent County estate. The 29 November 1750 account of his estate included the payment of a bond to Daniel Durham for 18 pounds [WB I-1:231; RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 332-3]. Thomas and Patience may have been the parents of 9 i. Benjamin, born say 1735. 6. John2 Francisco, born say 1723, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1743 to 1758 [1743 to 1767 Levy Assessments, frames 16, 24, 43, 51, 107, 136, 143, 187, 226]. On 26 February 1756 he petitioned the Kent County Orphans Court stating that his brother (Daniel?) had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife, Catherine, leaving an infant in the care of John Swaney who was unable to care for it. The court placed the child in his care. He married Sarah Durham, the Sarah Sisco who was mentioned in the 9 April 1788 Kent County will of her father John Durham [WB M-1, fol.170-1]. John Francisco died before 24 October 1798 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to (his son?) Charles Francisco. The inventory of his estate totaled over 942 pounds and included 80 acres of wheat worth 90 pounds and another 35 acres of crops worth 20 pounds. On 10 November 1800 the estate was divided among his widow Elizabeth Francisco and Charles, Lydia, and Esther Francisco [RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 196-208]. His children were most likely i. John3, Jr., born say 1738, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1758. ii. James, born say 1740, sued Isaac Carty in Kent County in a case discontinued by the plaintiff before trial in February 1762 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1760-1762, frame 406]. taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770. 10 iii. Lydia, born say 1743. 11 iv. Charles, born say 1745. v. Esther, born say 1752, called herself a "free woman of color" when she made her 11 February 1813 Kent County will, proved 21 March 1815, by which she left 4-1/4 acres and her personal estate to Geloco Lockerman, requiring her to pay George Derham's wife over a period of four years [WB P-1:69]. 7. Rachel1 Sisco, born perhaps 1715, was bound apprentice by her mother, Elizabeth Francisco, in Northampton County, Virginia on 17 March 1717/18. She was tithable in Ann Batson's Northampton County household in 1738. Her children were i. Phillis1, born about 1737, five year old "Negro" daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice in Northampton County in March 1741/2 [Orders 1732-42, 484]. ii. Bridget, born about 1739, three year old "Negro" daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice in September 1742 [Orders 1732-42, 484]. iii. ?Rachel2, born about 1760, nine years old when she was bound apprentice in August 1769 [Minutes 1765-71, 306]. Other likely descendants of Rachel Sisco were i. Phillis2, born about 1758, a five-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice in Northampton County on December 1763 [Minutes 1761-65, 111]. She was the mother of Isaiah Sisco, born about 1776, nine years old when he was bound apprentice by the Northampton County court on 1 May 1785 [Orders 1783-87, 284]. ii. James, born about 1768, four years old in July 1772 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 44]. iii. Daniel3 Cischo, born about 1771, five years old on 19 August 1776 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 372]. He was head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14]. 8. Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1765 to 1783 when he was crossed off the list [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 509, 521, 553, 566; 1768-84, frames 27, 129, 185, 223, 263, 310, 335, 341, 367, 368, 443, 503, 542, 583]. He was indicted by the Kent County court in November 1765 for having an illegitimate male child by Rachel Sisco, Jr., about May 1764. The court ordered Ephraim to support the boy for five years. Daniel Durham was his security [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1734-79, frame 446; MS case files November 1765]. He was a "Mulatoe" taxable on a mare, two horses, eight cows, two calves and eight sheep in Little Creek Hundred in 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1800-1, frame 413] and head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:36]. He was the father of i. John5, born say 1764, called "son of Ephr." from 1788 to 1790 when he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 75, 107, 191]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33]. ii. ?Amelia2 Cisco, born say 1770, married Jeremiah Shad in July 1790. Jeremiah was head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:161]. 9. Benjamin Sisco, born say 1735, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1754 to 1756, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1761 to 1767 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1768 [DSA, RG 3535, 1743-67, frames 136, 143, 168, 187, 315, 345, 354, 381, 396, 427, 436, 491, 518, 534, 551, 566; 1767-84, frames 10, 26]. Benjamin Wynn sued him in Kent County court in November 1769 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 43]. He may have been the father of i. William, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770 and 1771, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1773, in Little Creek Hundred in 1776 and 1778 and in Dover Hundred in 1778 [DSA, RG 3535, Assessments 1768-84, frames 66, 129, 180, 263, 335, 341]. ii. Amelia1, born say 1755, married Hanser, perhaps the Nehemiah2 Hanser who was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1785 to 1788. Amelia died before 9 December 1814 when administration on her Kent County estate was granted to John Francisco [WB P-1:61]. iii. Mary, born say 1758, had an illegitimate male child in Little Creek Hundred in December 1775 [RG 3805.0, MS case papers, May Term 1776]. She died before 29 May 1808 when administration papers were filed on her estate which amounted to $41.61 [DSA, RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 325-8]. iv. George, born say 1763, had an illegitimate daughter by Ann Munt in Duck Creek Hundred in 1782 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS Kent County Court case papers, August 1782 Indictments]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1785 to 1789, a taxable "Mulattoe" in 1797 and 1798. By his 10 November 1814 Kent County will, proved two weeks later on 26 November, he divided his estate between his sister Emela (Amelia) Hanser and his brother William Sisco. Jacob Trusty paid cash to the estate [RG 3845.000, roll 201, frames 819-24; WB P-1:59]. 10. Lydia Francisco, born say 1743, was charged in Kent court in February 1770 with having an illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1734-79, frames 547, 551]. She was named in her brother Charles' 20 January 1798 Kent County will. By her 7 November 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 18 December 1798, she left her daughter Elizabeth all her interest in her father's estate [WB N-1, fol. 221-2]. She was the mother of i. Elizabeth, born say 1770. 11. Charles Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1765 to 1785. He was granted administration on the estate of (his father?) John Francisco on 24 October 1791 [WB N-1, fol. 5]. By his 20 January 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 9 February 1798, he gave his sister Lydia his part of his father's estate and all his own estate to his sister Lydia's daughter Elizabeth Francisco [WB N-1, fol. 195-6]. Charles was the father of i. John4, born say 1764, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1785 and called "son of Chrls." in the list for 1787. Other Delaware descendants were i. Comfort, head of a Little Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:37]. ii. Isaiah, husband of Rachel Sisco who died before 13 February 1826 when John Carney, Jr., of New Castle County was granted administration on her Kent County estate [WB Q-1:78].
All Fields in This Record
State Virginia
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Accomack, Kent, Somerset
Family Name Francisco/Sisco
Family History Notes 1. John1 Francisco, born perhaps 1630, was the slave of Stephen Charlton for whom Charlton claimed a headright in Northampton County, Virginia, in August 1647 [DW 1645-51, 97 by Deal, Race and Class]. In July 1648 Charlton made a deed of manumission to free him ten years later in November 1658: and then the said Negro is to bee a free man. He was called "Black Jack" in Charlton's October 1654 will by which he received his freedom. Charlton also agreed to free John's wife, Christian, a "Negro woman," three years after his death or within six months if she paid 2,500 pounds of tobacco [DW 1645-51, 150-2; 1654-55, fol.57]. John and Christian were tithable in their own household in Northampton County from 1665 to 1671. Grace Susanna (Sebastian Cane's wife?) was in their household in 1667. In 1668 the court agreed to have the "Negro" child of Thomas Driggers, then living with him, bound to him until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, fol.14, p.42, 53, fol.54, fol.115]. He was called "John Francisco Negroe" on 7 July 1685 when the Accomack County court ordered him to pay his debt of 5,090 pounds of tobacco to Colonel William Kendall [W&c 1682-97, 66a]. He was taxable in Accomack County from 1674 to 1695, called a "negro" in 1676 and 1686. In 1684 one of his three tithables was identified as his unnamed wife [Orders 1676-78, 33, 57; 1678-82, 18, 99; W&c 1682-97, 191, 258; Nottingham, Accomack Tithables, 12, 16, 18, 19, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 31, 33, 35, 37, 40, 42, 44, 47, 50, 52, 54, 60]. John was probably the ancestor of 2 i. Daniel1, born say 1680. 3 ii. Elizabeth, born say 1695. iii. Thomas1 Frisco, born say 1700, a Northampton County taxable with Ann Frisco in 1724 and tithable without Ann in Nathaniel Anders' household in 1725 [L.P. 1724, 1725]. He may have been identical to Thomas2 Sisco of Kent County, Delaware. 2. Daniel1 Francisco, born say 1680, was sued for debt in Northampton County, Virginia, on 28 November 1706. The case was dismissed because neither part appeared [Orders, Wills, Etc., 1698-1710, 308]. Daniel was probably in company with William Driggers because Daniel had a child by Mary Winslow in Somerset County sometime in 1708, and William Driggers helped him by carrying her out of county to avoid prosecution. Daniel was called a Somerset County planter when he admitted to being the father of Mary's child when he appeared in court seven years later in March 1713/4. He was probably living with Elizabeth Francisco, "of Somerset County," who was sued for a debt of 500 pounds of tobacco on 5 June 1712 by Samuel Daughty with whom she had contracted to pay by 7 May 1712 at Pocomoke. On 7 August 1712 her bail was forfeited to pay the debt [Judicial Records 1707-11, 94-6, 103; 1711-13, 167, 225; 1713-5, 5, 26]. Daniel was in Accomack County on 6 July 1715 when the court ordered that he, John Smith, John Martiall, and Richard Rowle/ Rowlin be summoned to the next court for disobeying Constable Hill Drummond while he was trying to break up a fight. The other parties were fined when they appeared at the next court on 4 October, but there was no further mention of Daniel [Orders 1714-17, 10a, 11]. He was sued for debt by Evan Jones in Kent County, Delaware court in November 1724, by Nicholas Greenway in May 1725, by Jonathan Griffin in May 1731 and Nicholas Nixon for a 16 pound debt in August 1731 [RG 3815.031, Dockets 1722-1732, frames 83, 84, 492, 498, 519, 593 ; MS case papers]. He was listed in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware tax assessments from 1727 to 1733 (listed near Winslow Drigers, Thomas Comsoloe, Julius Caesar, William Beckett, and Jacob Miller in 1727) [RG 3535, Assessments 1726-42, frames 346, 352, 358, 363, 369], apparently identical to David Francisco who died before 22 September 1732 when the inventory of his Kent County, Delaware estate was taken. (This inventory is not the original, but a copy made in 1752. Perhaps the clerk wrote David for Daniel). Daniel may have married the daughter of Thomas Consellor who mentioned his daughter Elizabeth Francisco in his 26 September 1739 Kent County will. "Elisabeth Siscom" was head of a household in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1738, taxable on her son Thomas. Doctor Ridgely was allowed 7 pounds for her maintenance by the Kent County levy court on 18 December 1766 [Kent Count Levy List, 1727-67, frame 531]. Daniel and Elizabeth may have been the parents of 4 i. Daniel2, born say 1700. ii. Tabitha, born say 1705, sued by Jacob Miller in Kent County court but withdrawn in August 1731 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1722-1732, frame 509]. 5 iii. Thomas2, born say 1715. 6 iv. John2, born say 1723. v. Rebecca, sued in Kent County court in August 1748 by John Clayton in a case decided out of court [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 423]. 3. Elizabeth Francisco, born say 1695, was a "negro" who bound out her daughter, Rachel, to Robert Nottingham in Northampton County on 17 March 1717/18 [Orders 1716-18, 84]. She bound out her daughter, Sabra, "a Negro Child" to Abraham Bowker on 18 August 1719 [Orders 1719-22, 31]. On 13 September 1722 she was accused of murdering her child but was acquitted of the charge [Orders 1719-22, 183]. In November 1722 Bowker sued her to recover his costs for looking after her during her childbirth. She may have left the county since Ralph Pigot forfeited the bail he posted for her appearance in court to answer Bowker [Milhalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 37, 42]. Her children were 7 i. Rachel1, born perhaps 1715. ii. Sabra, born perhaps 1717. 4. Daniel2 Francisco, born say 1700, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1748, listed next to John Francisco [Assessments 1743-48 (RG 3535-2), frame 51], but not listed in later assessments, so he may have been the brother of John Francisco who petitioned the Kent County Orphans Court on 26 February 1756 stating that his brother had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife Catherine, leaving an infant. Perhaps Daniel's widow was Ruth Fransisscoe who was being maintained by James Starling on 18 November 1766 when the Kent County levy court allowed him 10 pounds for her maintenance [Levy List 1727-67, frame 530], and perhaps he was the father of 8 i. Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745. 5. Thomas2 Francisco, born say 1715, was taxable in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of his mother Elisabeth Siscom in 1738 and taxable in his own household from 1740 to 1745. He died before 16 July 1748 when his widow Patience Sisco was granted administration on his Kent County estate. The 29 November 1750 account of his estate included the payment of a bond to Daniel Durham for 18 pounds [WB I-1:231; RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 332-3]. Thomas and Patience may have been the parents of 9 i. Benjamin, born say 1735. 6. John2 Francisco, born say 1723, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1743 to 1758 [1743 to 1767 Levy Assessments, frames 16, 24, 43, 51, 107, 136, 143, 187, 226]. On 26 February 1756 he petitioned the Kent County Orphans Court stating that his brother (Daniel?) had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife, Catherine, leaving an infant in the care of John Swaney who was unable to care for it. The court placed the child in his care. He married Sarah Durham, the Sarah Sisco who was mentioned in the 9 April 1788 Kent County will of her father John Durham [WB M-1, fol.170-1]. John Francisco died before 24 October 1798 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to (his son?) Charles Francisco. The inventory of his estate totaled over 942 pounds and included 80 acres of wheat worth 90 pounds and another 35 acres of crops worth 20 pounds. On 10 November 1800 the estate was divided among his widow Elizabeth Francisco and Charles, Lydia, and Esther Francisco [RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 196-208]. His children were most likely i. John3, Jr., born say 1738, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1758. ii. James, born say 1740, sued Isaac Carty in Kent County in a case discontinued by the plaintiff before trial in February 1762 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1760-1762, frame 406]. taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770. 10 iii. Lydia, born say 1743. 11 iv. Charles, born say 1745. v. Esther, born say 1752, called herself a "free woman of color" when she made her 11 February 1813 Kent County will, proved 21 March 1815, by which she left 4-1/4 acres and her personal estate to Geloco Lockerman, requiring her to pay George Derham's wife over a period of four years [WB P-1:69]. 7. Rachel1 Sisco, born perhaps 1715, was bound apprentice by her mother, Elizabeth Francisco, in Northampton County, Virginia on 17 March 1717/18. She was tithable in Ann Batson's Northampton County household in 1738. Her children were i. Phillis1, born about 1737, five year old "Negro" daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice in Northampton County in March 1741/2 [Orders 1732-42, 484]. ii. Bridget, born about 1739, three year old "Negro" daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice in September 1742 [Orders 1732-42, 484]. iii. ?Rachel2, born about 1760, nine years old when she was bound apprentice in August 1769 [Minutes 1765-71, 306]. Other likely descendants of Rachel Sisco were i. Phillis2, born about 1758, a five-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice in Northampton County on December 1763 [Minutes 1761-65, 111]. She was the mother of Isaiah Sisco, born about 1776, nine years old when he was bound apprentice by the Northampton County court on 1 May 1785 [Orders 1783-87, 284]. ii. James, born about 1768, four years old in July 1772 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 44]. iii. Daniel3 Cischo, born about 1771, five years old on 19 August 1776 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 372]. He was head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14]. 8. Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1765 to 1783 when he was crossed off the list [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 509, 521, 553, 566; 1768-84, frames 27, 129, 185, 223, 263, 310, 335, 341, 367, 368, 443, 503, 542, 583]. He was indicted by the Kent County court in November 1765 for having an illegitimate male child by Rachel Sisco, Jr., about May 1764. The court ordered Ephraim to support the boy for five years. Daniel Durham was his security [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1734-79, frame 446; MS case files November 1765]. He was a "Mulatoe" taxable on a mare, two horses, eight cows, two calves and eight sheep in Little Creek Hundred in 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1800-1, frame 413] and head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:36]. He was the father of i. John5, born say 1764, called "son of Ephr." from 1788 to 1790 when he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 75, 107, 191]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33]. ii. ?Amelia2 Cisco, born say 1770, married Jeremiah Shad in July 1790. Jeremiah was head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:161]. 9. Benjamin Sisco, born say 1735, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1754 to 1756, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1761 to 1767 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1768 [DSA, RG 3535, 1743-67, frames 136, 143, 168, 187, 315, 345, 354, 381, 396, 427, 436, 491, 518, 534, 551, 566; 1767-84, frames 10, 26]. Benjamin Wynn sued him in Kent County court in November 1769 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 43]. He may have been the father of i. William, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770 and 1771, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1773, in Little Creek Hundred in 1776 and 1778 and in Dover Hundred in 1778 [DSA, RG 3535, Assessments 1768-84, frames 66, 129, 180, 263, 335, 341]. ii. Amelia1, born say 1755, married Hanser, perhaps the Nehemiah2 Hanser who was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1785 to 1788. Amelia died before 9 December 1814 when administration on her Kent County estate was granted to John Francisco [WB P-1:61]. iii. Mary, born say 1758, had an illegitimate male child in Little Creek Hundred in December 1775 [RG 3805.0, MS case papers, May Term 1776]. She died before 29 May 1808 when administration papers were filed on her estate which amounted to $41.61 [DSA, RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 325-8]. iv. George, born say 1763, had an illegitimate daughter by Ann Munt in Duck Creek Hundred in 1782 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS Kent County Court case papers, August 1782 Indictments]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1785 to 1789, a taxable "Mulattoe" in 1797 and 1798. By his 10 November 1814 Kent County will, proved two weeks later on 26 November, he divided his estate between his sister Emela (Amelia) Hanser and his brother William Sisco. Jacob Trusty paid cash to the estate [RG 3845.000, roll 201, frames 819-24; WB P-1:59]. 10. Lydia Francisco, born say 1743, was charged in Kent court in February 1770 with having an illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1734-79, frames 547, 551]. She was named in her brother Charles' 20 January 1798 Kent County will. By her 7 November 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 18 December 1798, she left her daughter Elizabeth all her interest in her father's estate [WB N-1, fol. 221-2]. She was the mother of i. Elizabeth, born say 1770. 11. Charles Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1765 to 1785. He was granted administration on the estate of (his father?) John Francisco on 24 October 1791 [WB N-1, fol. 5]. By his 20 January 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 9 February 1798, he gave his sister Lydia his part of his father's estate and all his own estate to his sister Lydia's daughter Elizabeth Francisco [WB N-1, fol. 195-6]. Charles was the father of i. John4, born say 1764, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1785 and called "son of Chrls." in the list for 1787. Other Delaware descendants were i. Comfort, head of a Little Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:37]. ii. Isaiah, husband of Rachel Sisco who died before 13 February 1826 when John Carney, Jr., of New Castle County was granted administration on her Kent County estate [WB Q-1:78].
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Family Name Friend
Family History Notes Members of the Friend family were 1 i. Job, born say 1750. 2 ii. John, born say 1765. iii. Isaac, "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:197]. He was called a "negro" in the 7 February 1814 deed by which he purchased 130 perches of land in Caroline County near Brown's Saw Mill on 7 February 1814, 8-1/2 acres called Alcock's Fancy on the northeast side of Robins Saw Mill Branch and 6-1/2 acres called Holb's Folly on 1 August 1817 [DB L:166-7; M-6, 7].. iv. Pattey, born say 1780, mother of Charles Friend who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 16 November 1827: of a chesnut colour, was born free, raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Pattey Friend who was also born free, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 57]. 1. Job Friend, born say 1750, married Patience Jackson, "Melattoes" in Sussex County, Delaware, on 8 June 1772 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284]. They were the parents of i. Jackson, born 19 September 177_, "mulatto" son of Job and Patience Friend, baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was head of a Mispillion, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:92], 3 in 1810 [DE:46], and a Dover household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:32]. 2. John Friend, born say 1765, was head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the father of i. Henry, born 4 April 1781, a free born "coloured man" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 29 April 1826 [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 192]. He purchased 33 acres in Caroline County on the road from Hunting Creek Mill to Fowling Creek Mill, called Harris's Hazard and Edmondson's Desire, for $218 on 27 February 1821. On 3 January 1833 John Friend "(negro)" sold this land which descended to him by the death of Henry Friend, for $50 [DB N:216-7; R:333-4].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Caroline, Sussex, Kent
Family Name Friend
Family History Notes Members of the Friend family were 1 i. Job, born say 1750. 2 ii. John, born say 1765. iii. Isaac, "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:197]. He was called a "negro" in the 7 February 1814 deed by which he purchased 130 perches of land in Caroline County near Brown's Saw Mill on 7 February 1814, 8-1/2 acres called Alcock's Fancy on the northeast side of Robins Saw Mill Branch and 6-1/2 acres called Holb's Folly on 1 August 1817 [DB L:166-7; M-6, 7].. iv. Pattey, born say 1780, mother of Charles Friend who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 16 November 1827: of a chesnut colour, was born free, raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Pattey Friend who was also born free, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 57]. 1. Job Friend, born say 1750, married Patience Jackson, "Melattoes" in Sussex County, Delaware, on 8 June 1772 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284]. They were the parents of i. Jackson, born 19 September 177_, "mulatto" son of Job and Patience Friend, baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was head of a Mispillion, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:92], 3 in 1810 [DE:46], and a Dover household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:32]. 2. John Friend, born say 1765, was head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the father of i. Henry, born 4 April 1781, a free born "coloured man" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 29 April 1826 [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 192]. He purchased 33 acres in Caroline County on the road from Hunting Creek Mill to Fowling Creek Mill, called Harris's Hazard and Edmondson's Desire, for $218 on 27 February 1821. On 3 January 1833 John Friend "(negro)" sold this land which descended to him by the death of Henry Friend, for $50 [DB N:216-7; R:333-4].
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Family Name Frost
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Frost, born say 1746, was the servant of James Wilson on 23 August 1766 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by "Bristo a Negro man belonging to Betty Waters." The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her son Planner to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Record 1766-7, 9-10]. Sarah and Bristo were the parents of i. Planner, born about 1766, head of a Somerset County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:467].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Frost
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Frost, born say 1746, was the servant of James Wilson on 23 August 1766 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by "Bristo a Negro man belonging to Betty Waters." The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her son Planner to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Record 1766-7, 9-10]. Sarah and Bristo were the parents of i. Planner, born about 1766, head of a Somerset County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:467].
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Family Name Game
Family History Notes 1. Sambo Game, born say 1670, was the slave of Peter Douty of Somerset County. While still a slave, Sambo may have had a child by a white woman named Mauldlin Magee. Her daughter Fortune Game/ Magee was the servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered her to serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. Sambo and his wife Betty were "Negro" slaves freed by Peter Douty's 1709 Somerset County will. Douty also allowed them the use of his 150 acre plantation, called Paris, in the Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County during their lives [Wills Liber 5:142; Land Records Liber CD:416]. They were free by 1713 when they petitioned the Somerset County court to allow Betty to be tax free [Liber AC:17]. He was called "Sambo Gam a Negro" when he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings by the executor of Peter Douty's estate [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 36B, 245]. He was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, from 1724 to 1733, listed in a household adjoining Fortune Game in 1728. "Negro" Grace, a taxable in his household in 1724 and 1727, may have been his slave; and Robert Game, a taxable in his household in 1728, was probably his son. Patrick Makeala and Samuel Clark, who were probably white, were taxables in his household in 1727 [List of Taxables, 1724-33]. He probably died before 1735 when Betty paid quit rents on their land [Somerset County Debt Book 1734, 79; 1735, 47 cited by Davidson, Free Blacks on the lower Eastern Shore]. Sambo may have been the father of 2 i. Fortune Magee, born say 1687. 3 ii. Robert, born say 1710. 4 iii. Harry, born say 1720. 2. Fortune Game, born say 1687, was called Fortune Magee, the servant of Mrs. Mary Day, on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County, Maryland who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. In 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251; 1711-3, 220]. She was called Fortune Game, a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household from 1728 to 1735, with Betty Game in 1728 and 1731, and with Betty and Rose Game in 1733. She was the mother of 5 i. Rose, born March 1703. 6 ii. Sue Magee, born in April 1705. 7 iii. Perlina, born in April 1707. 8 iv. ?Betty, born say 1712. vi. ?Sarah Fortune, born say 1715. See the Fortune family history. v. ?Anville, born say 1722, taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1738 and 1740 and taxable in Isaac Bebbings' Nanticoke Hundred household in 1744. 3. Robert Game, born say 1710, was taxable in the Somerset County household of Sambo Game in 1728. He was head of his own Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1733 with (his wife?) Ellender Game until 1749 and taxable by himself in 1750. He was in Murderkill Hundred, Delaware, when he made his September 1782 will, proved 17 October 1782. He left his wife Elizabeth his largest bed which was to go to her daughter Mary Lanthorn after her death and left his wife a cow which was to go to her daughter and Sarah Lanthorn (Lantern) after her death. His inventory included two mares, a colt and corn in the field [RG 3545, roll 82, frame 425; DB L-1, fol. 267-8]. Robert may have been the father of i. Levin1, born say 1740, convicted of murder in May 1767. Betty and Sarah Game/ Tompson/ Fortune testified against him. The Governor issued a death warrant for him on 13 June 1767 [Provincial Court Judgments, May Term 1767, 648-52; Archives of Maryland 32:200]. ii. Ephraim1, taxable in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. He was a recruit from Dorchester County in the Revolutionary War on 25 July 1780 [Archives of Maryland 18:339]. iii. Henry2, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free' in 1800 [MD:340]. 4. Harry1 Game, born say 1720, was probably identical to "Harry Negro," a taxable slave in the Nanticoke Hundred household of Priscilla Dashiell in 1738. He may have been related to Sambo Game since Priscilla Dashiell was one of Peter Douty's heirs [Land Records, Liber A-2, 150]. He was probably the "negro physician," "Doctor Harrey," whose services were advertised in the 7 November 1750 issue of the Maryland Gazette. He, called Henry (Doctor) Game, and his wife Rose were free before 10 August 1751 when they registered the birth of their son Daniel at Stepney Parish, Somerset County. They were taxable in Somerset County in 1752. In 1757 Harry purchased for 70 pounds a 150 acre plantation called Covington's Choice in Wicomico Hundred and petitioned the Somerset County court to have his slave, Tite, tax exempt [Land Records, Liber B:173; Judicial Records 1757-61, 18]. Harry left a will in 1781 naming his sons, Daniel and Jeremiah [Wills, Liber EB 1:144]. His children were i. Daniel, born 10 August 1751 in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. He sued Stephen Adams in 1785 in Somerset County for 12 pounds for "attending, curing and healing a negro woman slave of said Stephen of divers diseases and infirmities" [Judicial Record 1786-88, 87]. ii. Bridget, daughter of Doctor Henry and Rose Game, born 20 February 1754 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. iii. Jeremiah, born say 1758, taxable on 60 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County in 1783. iv. ?Samuel, taxable on 55 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.42]. 5. Ross/ Rose Game, born in March 1703, child of Fortune Game, a taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1733. She owed 9 pounds, 11 shillings to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Her children, whose births were registered in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, were i. Joe Magee, a "molatto" bound by Rose Magee to Edward Rownds on 19 March 1722/3 [Judicial Record 1723-5, 3]. ii. Stephen Magee, born 25 June 1737, alias Game of Mulatto Rose or Rose Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 143] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790. iii. Isaac1 Magee Game, born 25 June 1741, son of Mullato Rose or Rose Game alias Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He owed a shilling to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:36-44]. He may have been identical to Sax Game, a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1759. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777. 6. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when the births of her "mulatto" children, Belindor, Davey, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were registered at Stepney Parish. Her children were i. ?Ned, born say 1737, a "Mullatto" (no last name) with eleven months to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. ii. Belindor Magee, born September 1741, "otherwise Belinder Game dau of Mollatto Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." She was probably the "Mullatto" Belinda listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with fourteen years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. She may have been identical to "Blinda" (no last name) who was a taxable with Ephraim Game and James Right in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. iii. Davey Magee, born 14 March 1745, "otherwise Davey Game son of mollato Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." He was probably the "Mullatto" David listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with sixteen and one half years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. iv. Janney Magee, born 13 October 1746, "otherwise Janney Game son of mollato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." v. James Magee, born 28 July 1750, "otherwise James Game son of mullato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." vi. Nelly Magee, born 9 _ , 1754, alias Game (dau of Mullato Sue) [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:126; 3:42]. 7. Perlina Game, born in April 1707, was five years old "next April" in March 1712 when she was bound apprentice in Somerset County court. She was probably identical to "Ner Game," a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1734 and to Polina Gam who was a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household with Sarah Gam in 1759. She may have been the mother of 9 i. Sarah, born say 1730. 8. Betty Game, born say 1712, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Fortune Game from 1728 to 1731. She had an illegitimate child in Stepney Parish on 1 September 1732 for which she received ten lashes. Stephen Winwright was her security for payment of the court costs [Judicial Record 1730-3, 262-3]. She was identical to Betty Fortune who was a taxable head of household in Nanticoke Hundred with (her daughter?) Fortune Fortune in 1757. On 22 October 1754 Betty Game purchased 50 acres called Georges Pleasure on the southside of the Nanticoke River in Somerset County from Day Scott for 5 pounds, and on 5 December 1772 Betty sold this land for 33 pounds [DB B:42-3; O:26-7]. By his 14 June 1753 Somerset County will, proved 17 August 1757, George Day Scott left Betty Fortune the 50 acre tract where she was then living if she paid the balance due [WB 1756-61, 58]. Bess Fortune owed 9 shillings to the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Betty was probably one of "Two Women of a Dark Complection Live a the Head of Tippin(?)" listed by the constable as having refused to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women in 1743. The constable reported further that "they are full as Dark as most Mallatos. They are of the Breed of old fortune and Robt. Game" [List of Taxables, 1743]. She was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777 and 1790. She may have been the mother of i. George1 Game, born say 1733, taxable in Betty Game's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1749. ii. "Negro Patience Thomson," a taxable in Betty Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1756, called Patience Game in 1783, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred [MSA S1161-9-10, p.45]. iii. ?Fortune Fortune, born say 1740, taxable in Betty Fortune's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1757. iv. Levin2, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791. v. John Game, taxable in Indian River, Sussex County in 1789, called a "Mulato" in the list of delinquents: "not Settled anywhere," and taxable there in 1790 and 1791. 9. Sarah Game, born say 1730, was taxable in Perlina Game's Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1759. She was living in Stepney Parish in March 1762 when she confessed to having a child by by an unnamed "Negro slave." The court sold her son Ephraim to her master George Scott for thirty-one years and ordered her master to return her to court at the completion of her indenture so she could be sold for seven years. In June 1762 Scott was the highest bidder for her servitude at 3,150 Pounds [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b, 151]. She was the mother of a "Melatto" son Lovewell who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Indian River Hundred in May 1770 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex County, 100]. She had another illegitimate child in Stepney Parish before 15 March 1768 and paid a double fine to avoid naming the father [Judicial Records 1767-9, 70, 146]. She was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:309] and 1 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408].She was the mother of i. Ephraim2, born in January 1762. ii. Lovewell, baptized in May 1770. Other Delaware Game descendants were i. George2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. He married Leah Noble, 6 December 1799 Worcester County, Maryland bond. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. Leah may have been related to Mark Noble, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17]. George Game "of Geo." (age 25) and Spenser Game "of Geo." (age 25) emigrated to Liberia from Somerset County aboard the ship Lafayette in 1832 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390]. ii. Isaac2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. iii. Levin3, born 1776-1794, sold (signing) 50 acres called Pembertons Goodwill in Somerset County on 14 February 1818 for $50 [DB JD-3:336-7]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:412], obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 27 May 1825: born free in Somerset County ... bright Mollatto Complexion ... about thirty nine years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 48].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Game
Family History Notes 1. Sambo Game, born say 1670, was the slave of Peter Douty of Somerset County. While still a slave, Sambo may have had a child by a white woman named Mauldlin Magee. Her daughter Fortune Game/ Magee was the servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered her to serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. Sambo and his wife Betty were "Negro" slaves freed by Peter Douty's 1709 Somerset County will. Douty also allowed them the use of his 150 acre plantation, called Paris, in the Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County during their lives [Wills Liber 5:142; Land Records Liber CD:416]. They were free by 1713 when they petitioned the Somerset County court to allow Betty to be tax free [Liber AC:17]. He was called "Sambo Gam a Negro" when he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings by the executor of Peter Douty's estate [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 36B, 245]. He was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, from 1724 to 1733, listed in a household adjoining Fortune Game in 1728. "Negro" Grace, a taxable in his household in 1724 and 1727, may have been his slave; and Robert Game, a taxable in his household in 1728, was probably his son. Patrick Makeala and Samuel Clark, who were probably white, were taxables in his household in 1727 [List of Taxables, 1724-33]. He probably died before 1735 when Betty paid quit rents on their land [Somerset County Debt Book 1734, 79; 1735, 47 cited by Davidson, Free Blacks on the lower Eastern Shore]. Sambo may have been the father of 2 i. Fortune Magee, born say 1687. 3 ii. Robert, born say 1710. 4 iii. Harry, born say 1720. 2. Fortune Game, born say 1687, was called Fortune Magee, the servant of Mrs. Mary Day, on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County, Maryland who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. In 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251; 1711-3, 220]. She was called Fortune Game, a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household from 1728 to 1735, with Betty Game in 1728 and 1731, and with Betty and Rose Game in 1733. She was the mother of 5 i. Rose, born March 1703. 6 ii. Sue Magee, born in April 1705. 7 iii. Perlina, born in April 1707. 8 iv. ?Betty, born say 1712. vi. ?Sarah Fortune, born say 1715. See the Fortune family history. v. ?Anville, born say 1722, taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1738 and 1740 and taxable in Isaac Bebbings' Nanticoke Hundred household in 1744. 3. Robert Game, born say 1710, was taxable in the Somerset County household of Sambo Game in 1728. He was head of his own Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1733 with (his wife?) Ellender Game until 1749 and taxable by himself in 1750. He was in Murderkill Hundred, Delaware, when he made his September 1782 will, proved 17 October 1782. He left his wife Elizabeth his largest bed which was to go to her daughter Mary Lanthorn after her death and left his wife a cow which was to go to her daughter and Sarah Lanthorn (Lantern) after her death. His inventory included two mares, a colt and corn in the field [RG 3545, roll 82, frame 425; DB L-1, fol. 267-8]. Robert may have been the father of i. Levin1, born say 1740, convicted of murder in May 1767. Betty and Sarah Game/ Tompson/ Fortune testified against him. The Governor issued a death warrant for him on 13 June 1767 [Provincial Court Judgments, May Term 1767, 648-52; Archives of Maryland 32:200]. ii. Ephraim1, taxable in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. He was a recruit from Dorchester County in the Revolutionary War on 25 July 1780 [Archives of Maryland 18:339]. iii. Henry2, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free' in 1800 [MD:340]. 4. Harry1 Game, born say 1720, was probably identical to "Harry Negro," a taxable slave in the Nanticoke Hundred household of Priscilla Dashiell in 1738. He may have been related to Sambo Game since Priscilla Dashiell was one of Peter Douty's heirs [Land Records, Liber A-2, 150]. He was probably the "negro physician," "Doctor Harrey," whose services were advertised in the 7 November 1750 issue of the Maryland Gazette. He, called Henry (Doctor) Game, and his wife Rose were free before 10 August 1751 when they registered the birth of their son Daniel at Stepney Parish, Somerset County. They were taxable in Somerset County in 1752. In 1757 Harry purchased for 70 pounds a 150 acre plantation called Covington's Choice in Wicomico Hundred and petitioned the Somerset County court to have his slave, Tite, tax exempt [Land Records, Liber B:173; Judicial Records 1757-61, 18]. Harry left a will in 1781 naming his sons, Daniel and Jeremiah [Wills, Liber EB 1:144]. His children were i. Daniel, born 10 August 1751 in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. He sued Stephen Adams in 1785 in Somerset County for 12 pounds for "attending, curing and healing a negro woman slave of said Stephen of divers diseases and infirmities" [Judicial Record 1786-88, 87]. ii. Bridget, daughter of Doctor Henry and Rose Game, born 20 February 1754 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. iii. Jeremiah, born say 1758, taxable on 60 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County in 1783. iv. ?Samuel, taxable on 55 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.42]. 5. Ross/ Rose Game, born in March 1703, child of Fortune Game, a taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1733. She owed 9 pounds, 11 shillings to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Her children, whose births were registered in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, were i. Joe Magee, a "molatto" bound by Rose Magee to Edward Rownds on 19 March 1722/3 [Judicial Record 1723-5, 3]. ii. Stephen Magee, born 25 June 1737, alias Game of Mulatto Rose or Rose Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 143] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790. iii. Isaac1 Magee Game, born 25 June 1741, son of Mullato Rose or Rose Game alias Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He owed a shilling to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:36-44]. He may have been identical to Sax Game, a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1759. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777. 6. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when the births of her "mulatto" children, Belindor, Davey, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were registered at Stepney Parish. Her children were i. ?Ned, born say 1737, a "Mullatto" (no last name) with eleven months to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. ii. Belindor Magee, born September 1741, "otherwise Belinder Game dau of Mollatto Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." She was probably the "Mullatto" Belinda listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with fourteen years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. She may have been identical to "Blinda" (no last name) who was a taxable with Ephraim Game and James Right in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. iii. Davey Magee, born 14 March 1745, "otherwise Davey Game son of mollato Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." He was probably the "Mullatto" David listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with sixteen and one half years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. iv. Janney Magee, born 13 October 1746, "otherwise Janney Game son of mollato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." v. James Magee, born 28 July 1750, "otherwise James Game son of mullato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game." vi. Nelly Magee, born 9 _ , 1754, alias Game (dau of Mullato Sue) [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:126; 3:42]. 7. Perlina Game, born in April 1707, was five years old "next April" in March 1712 when she was bound apprentice in Somerset County court. She was probably identical to "Ner Game," a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1734 and to Polina Gam who was a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household with Sarah Gam in 1759. She may have been the mother of 9 i. Sarah, born say 1730. 8. Betty Game, born say 1712, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Fortune Game from 1728 to 1731. She had an illegitimate child in Stepney Parish on 1 September 1732 for which she received ten lashes. Stephen Winwright was her security for payment of the court costs [Judicial Record 1730-3, 262-3]. She was identical to Betty Fortune who was a taxable head of household in Nanticoke Hundred with (her daughter?) Fortune Fortune in 1757. On 22 October 1754 Betty Game purchased 50 acres called Georges Pleasure on the southside of the Nanticoke River in Somerset County from Day Scott for 5 pounds, and on 5 December 1772 Betty sold this land for 33 pounds [DB B:42-3; O:26-7]. By his 14 June 1753 Somerset County will, proved 17 August 1757, George Day Scott left Betty Fortune the 50 acre tract where she was then living if she paid the balance due [WB 1756-61, 58]. Bess Fortune owed 9 shillings to the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Betty was probably one of "Two Women of a Dark Complection Live a the Head of Tippin(?)" listed by the constable as having refused to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women in 1743. The constable reported further that "they are full as Dark as most Mallatos. They are of the Breed of old fortune and Robt. Game" [List of Taxables, 1743]. She was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777 and 1790. She may have been the mother of i. George1 Game, born say 1733, taxable in Betty Game's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1749. ii. "Negro Patience Thomson," a taxable in Betty Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1756, called Patience Game in 1783, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred [MSA S1161-9-10, p.45]. iii. ?Fortune Fortune, born say 1740, taxable in Betty Fortune's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1757. iv. Levin2, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791. v. John Game, taxable in Indian River, Sussex County in 1789, called a "Mulato" in the list of delinquents: "not Settled anywhere," and taxable there in 1790 and 1791. 9. Sarah Game, born say 1730, was taxable in Perlina Game's Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1759. She was living in Stepney Parish in March 1762 when she confessed to having a child by by an unnamed "Negro slave." The court sold her son Ephraim to her master George Scott for thirty-one years and ordered her master to return her to court at the completion of her indenture so she could be sold for seven years. In June 1762 Scott was the highest bidder for her servitude at 3,150 Pounds [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b, 151]. She was the mother of a "Melatto" son Lovewell who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Indian River Hundred in May 1770 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex County, 100]. She had another illegitimate child in Stepney Parish before 15 March 1768 and paid a double fine to avoid naming the father [Judicial Records 1767-9, 70, 146]. She was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:309] and 1 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408].She was the mother of i. Ephraim2, born in January 1762. ii. Lovewell, baptized in May 1770. Other Delaware Game descendants were i. George2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. He married Leah Noble, 6 December 1799 Worcester County, Maryland bond. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. Leah may have been related to Mark Noble, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17]. George Game "of Geo." (age 25) and Spenser Game "of Geo." (age 25) emigrated to Liberia from Somerset County aboard the ship Lafayette in 1832 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390]. ii. Isaac2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. iii. Levin3, born 1776-1794, sold (signing) 50 acres called Pembertons Goodwill in Somerset County on 14 February 1818 for $50 [DB JD-3:336-7]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:412], obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 27 May 1825: born free in Somerset County ... bright Mollatto Complexion ... about thirty nine years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 48].
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Family Name George
Family History Notes The George family originated in Virginia with Peter George who was the "Negro" slave of Nathaniel Littleton of Northampton County in 1640. See the Virginia section of this web site for the entire George history. About 1676 Peter received his freedom from Captain Francis Pigot on the promise to pay 10,000 pounds of tobacco. He completed the last payment in 1682 [DW&c 1680-92, 53, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 444]. He must have been a free man when he was a witness to the will of King Tony, "Negro," proved 28 February 1677/8 [Orders 1674-79, 247]. In 1679 he rented land near Emmanuel Driggers [OW 1683-9, 150-1]. In March 1687/8 he was duped into thinking that "free Negroes should be slaves againe" by one of his white neighbors, Robert Candlin. He left all his household goods and livestock with Candlin and fled to Somerset County, Maryland, with his neighbor, Sarah Driggers, and several other unidentified free African Americans. He was called Peter George of Wiccocomoco Hundred Negro" on 23 April 1688 when he posted 5 pounds surety and he and (his wife?) Mary George were witnesses in a Somerset County court case for "Sarah Driggers Negro woman wife of Thomas Driggers Negro" [Archives of Maryland 91:47]. Perhaps (his wife?) Mary was Mary Rodriggus whose Northampton County tax was paid by the parish in 1674 [DW 1664-74, 273]. He and Sarah Driggers returned to Northampton County about three years later and successfully sued Candlin's widow for the recovery of his livestock [OW 1689-98, 106, 115-116]. Likely descendants in Maryland were i. America, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 15 "other free" in 1800 (called George America Negro) [MD:735]. He made a deed of manumission in Worcester County on 13 January 1800 by which he set free a "certain Negro woman called Jib" [DB T:43]. ii. Martha, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161]. iii. America2, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 (called George America) [DE:718]. iv. Patience, Negro head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:725]. v. Betty, Negro head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:718]. vi. Mary, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:738].
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State Virginia
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Worcester, Somerset
Family Name George
Family History Notes The George family originated in Virginia with Peter George who was the "Negro" slave of Nathaniel Littleton of Northampton County in 1640. See the Virginia section of this web site for the entire George history. About 1676 Peter received his freedom from Captain Francis Pigot on the promise to pay 10,000 pounds of tobacco. He completed the last payment in 1682 [DW&c 1680-92, 53, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 444]. He must have been a free man when he was a witness to the will of King Tony, "Negro," proved 28 February 1677/8 [Orders 1674-79, 247]. In 1679 he rented land near Emmanuel Driggers [OW 1683-9, 150-1]. In March 1687/8 he was duped into thinking that "free Negroes should be slaves againe" by one of his white neighbors, Robert Candlin. He left all his household goods and livestock with Candlin and fled to Somerset County, Maryland, with his neighbor, Sarah Driggers, and several other unidentified free African Americans. He was called Peter George of Wiccocomoco Hundred Negro" on 23 April 1688 when he posted 5 pounds surety and he and (his wife?) Mary George were witnesses in a Somerset County court case for "Sarah Driggers Negro woman wife of Thomas Driggers Negro" [Archives of Maryland 91:47]. Perhaps (his wife?) Mary was Mary Rodriggus whose Northampton County tax was paid by the parish in 1674 [DW 1664-74, 273]. He and Sarah Driggers returned to Northampton County about three years later and successfully sued Candlin's widow for the recovery of his livestock [OW 1689-98, 106, 115-116]. Likely descendants in Maryland were i. America, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 15 "other free" in 1800 (called George America Negro) [MD:735]. He made a deed of manumission in Worcester County on 13 January 1800 by which he set free a "certain Negro woman called Jib" [DB T:43]. ii. Martha, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161]. iii. America2, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 (called George America) [DE:718]. iv. Patience, Negro head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:725]. v. Betty, Negro head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:718]. vi. Mary, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:738].
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Family Name Griffin
Family History Notes Members of the Griffin family in Maryland and Delaware were i. Joseph1, a "Black Man" head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 9 "Negroes" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 48], head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800. ii. Peter, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:161]. iii. Ann, born say 1755, had an illegitimate male child by Nehemiah Hanser in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, about January 1774 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, February 1775 indictments]. 1 iv. Robert, born say 1775. v. Joseph2, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161]. vi. Catherine, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:172]. 1. Robert Griffin, born say 1775, was free and married to Priscilla Griffin on 10 March 1821 when his son Matthew obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County. Robert and Priscilla were the parents of i. Matthew, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 March 1821: of a yellow complection ... free born, was raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Robert and Priscilla Griffin who were both free, aged about 22 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 43].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Griffin
Family History Notes Members of the Griffin family in Maryland and Delaware were i. Joseph1, a "Black Man" head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 9 "Negroes" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 48], head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800. ii. Peter, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:161]. iii. Ann, born say 1755, had an illegitimate male child by Nehemiah Hanser in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, about January 1774 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, February 1775 indictments]. 1 iv. Robert, born say 1775. v. Joseph2, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161]. vi. Catherine, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:172]. 1. Robert Griffin, born say 1775, was free and married to Priscilla Griffin on 10 March 1821 when his son Matthew obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County. Robert and Priscilla were the parents of i. Matthew, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 March 1821: of a yellow complection ... free born, was raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Robert and Priscilla Griffin who were both free, aged about 22 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 43].
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Family Name Gurley
Family History Notes Members of the Gurley family were 1 i. Francis, born say 1760. ii. Bryan, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:425] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:218], probably the husband of Nancy Cornish. 1. Francis Gurley, born say 1760, was taxable in Wicomico Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 [Assessment of 1783, MSA S1437, p.4]. He purchased 25 acres in Worcester County called Castle Fine for 12 pounds on 11 June 1793, 7 acres on 3 May 1794, and 50 acres on the north side of Aydolet's branch for 28 pounds on 12 September 1800. He sold 25 acres leading to Captain Winder's Mill at Salisbury for $250 on 14 April 1810 and he and his wife Nelly sold 156 acres called Hard Fortune, Gurley's Choice and Hazel Ridge for $300 on 1 April 1812 [DB P:31-2, P:372-3, AB:78, AC:282]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 9 "other free" in 1790, 9 in 1800 [MD:914] and 3 in 1810 [MD:486]. He left a 22 March 1830 Sussex County will naming his wife Ellender and sons William and Robert [DSA, RG 4545.9]. He was the father of i. William. ii. Robert.
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties Worcester
Family Name Gurley
Family History Notes Members of the Gurley family were 1 i. Francis, born say 1760. ii. Bryan, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:425] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:218], probably the husband of Nancy Cornish. 1. Francis Gurley, born say 1760, was taxable in Wicomico Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 [Assessment of 1783, MSA S1437, p.4]. He purchased 25 acres in Worcester County called Castle Fine for 12 pounds on 11 June 1793, 7 acres on 3 May 1794, and 50 acres on the north side of Aydolet's branch for 28 pounds on 12 September 1800. He sold 25 acres leading to Captain Winder's Mill at Salisbury for $250 on 14 April 1810 and he and his wife Nelly sold 156 acres called Hard Fortune, Gurley's Choice and Hazel Ridge for $300 on 1 April 1812 [DB P:31-2, P:372-3, AB:78, AC:282]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 9 "other free" in 1790, 9 in 1800 [MD:914] and 3 in 1810 [MD:486]. He left a 22 March 1830 Sussex County will naming his wife Ellender and sons William and Robert [DSA, RG 4545.9]. He was the father of i. William. ii. Robert.
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Family Name Guy
Family History Notes 1. Guy, born say 1660, was a "Negroe" who was living in Island Hundred, Talbot County, on 15 November 1687 when the court ordered that he serve James Downs for two years as punishment for begetting an illegitimate child by Downs' servant Elizabeth Vincent sometime before 15 March 1685/6. Their daughter Barbara Vincent was bound to Downs until the age of twenty-one. Downs gave Guy his freedom on 2 May 1690 [Judgment Record 1686-9, 68, 173; Chattel Records 1689-92, 320]. They may have been the ancestors of 2 i. Joseph1, born say 1702. ii. Richard1, born say 1704, living in Queen Anne's County on 26 August 1735 when the court found in his favor in a suit brought against him by James Earle. He was called Richard Guy alias Williams in March 1738 when the court ordered him to serve James Earle another 5 years for running away for a total of 104 days in 1736 and 1737 [Judgment Record 1732-5, 541; 1735-7, 47]. 2. Joseph1 Guy, born say 1702, was a "free mulatto man begot by a Negro man on a white woman" living in Saint Paul's Parish on 10 August 1733 when the Queen Anne's County court convicted him of marrying a white woman named Bridget Jones and ordered them sold for seven years. Thomas Hynson Wright was highest bidder at 18 pounds, 10 shillings. He may have been identical to Joseph Williams alias Guy who John Emory won a suit against for 9,586 pounds of tobacco in June 1735. In November 1737 he confessed to running away for a total of 141 days in 1736 and 1737 and was ordered to serve an additional 1,410 days [Judgment Record 1732-5, 503-4, 513, 526]. They may have been the parents of i. Joseph2, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:173]. ii. Richard2, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:47]. iii. John, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:118] and a "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 3 in 1810 [DE:64]. iv. Samuel, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35]. v. George, "F. N." head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:19].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Queen Anne, Kent
Family Name Guy
Family History Notes 1. Guy, born say 1660, was a "Negroe" who was living in Island Hundred, Talbot County, on 15 November 1687 when the court ordered that he serve James Downs for two years as punishment for begetting an illegitimate child by Downs' servant Elizabeth Vincent sometime before 15 March 1685/6. Their daughter Barbara Vincent was bound to Downs until the age of twenty-one. Downs gave Guy his freedom on 2 May 1690 [Judgment Record 1686-9, 68, 173; Chattel Records 1689-92, 320]. They may have been the ancestors of 2 i. Joseph1, born say 1702. ii. Richard1, born say 1704, living in Queen Anne's County on 26 August 1735 when the court found in his favor in a suit brought against him by James Earle. He was called Richard Guy alias Williams in March 1738 when the court ordered him to serve James Earle another 5 years for running away for a total of 104 days in 1736 and 1737 [Judgment Record 1732-5, 541; 1735-7, 47]. 2. Joseph1 Guy, born say 1702, was a "free mulatto man begot by a Negro man on a white woman" living in Saint Paul's Parish on 10 August 1733 when the Queen Anne's County court convicted him of marrying a white woman named Bridget Jones and ordered them sold for seven years. Thomas Hynson Wright was highest bidder at 18 pounds, 10 shillings. He may have been identical to Joseph Williams alias Guy who John Emory won a suit against for 9,586 pounds of tobacco in June 1735. In November 1737 he confessed to running away for a total of 141 days in 1736 and 1737 and was ordered to serve an additional 1,410 days [Judgment Record 1732-5, 503-4, 513, 526]. They may have been the parents of i. Joseph2, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:173]. ii. Richard2, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:47]. iii. John, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:118] and a "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 3 in 1810 [DE:64]. iv. Samuel, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35]. v. George, "F. N." head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:19].
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Family Name Hailey
Family History Notes 1. Honour Haley, born say 1714, confessed in Somerset County court in November 1730 that she had a "negro Bastard Child" at the house of Captain William Turpin in Somerset Parish on 1 August 1730. The court ordered her to serve for seven years and sold her child to William Turpin for thirty-one years. On 25 August 1733 she confessed that she had an illegitimate child by "Jupiter a Negro man belonging to Jonathan Stanton," and the court sold her "Mollatto" daughter named Sarah to William Gray of Monacan until the age of thirty one for 500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Record 1730-3, 28; 1733-5, 61]. She was the ancestor of i. Sarah, born 24 July 1733. ii. ?Stephen Hailey, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:645].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Worcester
Family Name Hailey
Family History Notes 1. Honour Haley, born say 1714, confessed in Somerset County court in November 1730 that she had a "negro Bastard Child" at the house of Captain William Turpin in Somerset Parish on 1 August 1730. The court ordered her to serve for seven years and sold her child to William Turpin for thirty-one years. On 25 August 1733 she confessed that she had an illegitimate child by "Jupiter a Negro man belonging to Jonathan Stanton," and the court sold her "Mollatto" daughter named Sarah to William Gray of Monacan until the age of thirty one for 500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Record 1730-3, 28; 1733-5, 61]. She was the ancestor of i. Sarah, born 24 July 1733. ii. ?Stephen Hailey, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:645].
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Family Name Hanser/Hanzer
Family History Notes 1. Mary Vincent, born perhaps 1648, was a neighbor of the Johnson family in Accomack County.(1) In 1665 Richard Johnson and Thomas Tunnell agreed to support Mary's child by Aminadab, a slave of Southy Littleton, a planter on Nandua Creek in Accomack County [DW 1663-66, fol. 91]. The elder Aminadab died before 14 April 1665 when Southy Littleton of Accomack County gave the younger Aminadab "ye sonne of my servant Aminadab negro deceased and Mary Vincent Three cows and there female increase wch were formerly given to my said servant" [DW 1664-71, fol. 20]. On October 1666 Mary married John Okey, and they moved to Somerset County, Maryland, and then to Sussex County, Delaware, with the Johnson family [Torrence, Old Somerset, 399-400, 453, 474]. Mary's child by Aminadab was 2 i. Aminadab1, born about 1664. 2. Aminadab1 Hanzer, born about 1664, apparently adopted the name Hanzer sometime before April 1683 when he recorded his cattle mark in Sussex County, Delaware [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 222]. He was about twenty-four years old in September 1688 when he, John Okey and Mary Okey testified in Sussex County court that they had helped John Barker move his cattle from Accomack County to Sussex County, Delaware. His wife, Rose Hanser, also testified [Court Records 1680-99, 262]. In March 1689/90 he was called "Aminidab Hanger Negro," a twenty-six year old, and his wife was called Rose Hanjaw, an eighteen year old, when they testified in Accomack County court about this same court case in which John Barker was convicted of appropriating seven cattle belonging to William Burton and Thomas Bagwell. Rose testified that in 1684 she lived in John Barker's house on the land of William Burton and Thomas Bagwell [W&cO 1682-97, 181, 181a]. Rose may have been Rose Matthews who testified with Aminadab in another case concerning John Barker which was held in Sussex County court on 8 September 1685 [Court Records 1680-99, 93]. In February 1690 Aminadab acted as attorney for William Burton and Thomas Bagwell in their Sussex County court case, and on 2 September 1696 he and Edward Carey each purchased 200 acres of a 400 acre tract in Sussex County [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 682, 1025-6; DB A-198]. He was found not guilty in Sussex County court of stealing a fishing boat valued at ?20 on 4 November 1706 [RG 4815.017, dockets 1707-41, frame 3]. John Burton mentioned him in his 10 February 1708/9 Sussex County will [de Valinger, Sussex County Probate Records, 21]. He sued Aminadab Oaky (perhaps his half-brother?) in Sussex County court on 3 May 1704 over some damage which their neighbors were ordered to inspect and report back to the court [Horle, Records of Sussex County, 1191]. On 9 April 1713 Aminadab Oaky posted a ?100 security in Sussex County court to guarantee Aminadab Handsor that he would abide by the arbitrators' decision regarding the removal of a fence. He sold his 200 acre tract to Thomas Marriner on 28 May 1715. Aminadab and Rose were still living on 16 October 1717 when their son Aminadab, Jr., mentioned them in his Sussex County will. Aminadab, Sr., died before 8 December 1725 when Rose Hanzer was called the "widow, relict, and administrator of the estate of Aminadab Hanzer...Deceased" in the deed by which for ?33 she sold to Job Barker 150 acres being part of 200 acres (part of a larger tract of 400 acres which Aminadab Hanzer and Edward Carey purchased from Sarah Painter on 3 September 1695). Rose died before 5 May 1752 when their descendants, Bridget Norman, William Handsor "who lives in Kent County" (signing), Samuel Hansor (signing), Elias Hansor, and Mary Brown sold to Benjamin Burton 50 acres which was part of 400 acres in Little Creek Hundred called "Ebonezer ... being the Dwelling place of Rosanna Hanzor Deceased." On 2 February 1773 Thomas and William Handzer, "Mallatos," made a quit claim deed for 350 acres on Ivey Branch which had been granted to "Aminadab Handzer Malatto Deceasd" [DB D-4:225-7; F-6:220-2; H-1, 329-30; L-11, 314-5]. Aminadab and Rose's children were i. Aminadab2, born 23 January 1688/9 [Turner, Records of Sussex County, 146]. He made a Sussex County will on 15 March 1717 leaving a saddle and bridle to his brother Samuel, a yearling steer to his sisters Ann and Mary, and the remainder to his father and mother, Aminidab and Rose Handzer [WB A-1:122]. 3 ii. William1, born say 1692. 4 iii. Thomas1, born say 1693. 5 iv. Samuel1, born say 1695. v. Ann, born say 1710. She may have married Edward Norman, a "mulatto," who baptized his son, Edward, on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92], and they may have been the parents of Bridget Norman who sold land in Sussex County in 1752 "where Rosanna Hanzor formerly lived." vi. Mary, perhaps the Mary Brown who sold land in 1752 where (her mother?) Rosanna Hanzer had lived. 6 vii. Elias, born say 1712. 3. William1 Handsor, born say 1692, purchased 100 acres, called "Bottle and Cake," at the head of Long Neck in Indian River Hundred by deed proved in Sussex County court on 1 November 1715 and recorded a survey for "Bottle & Cake" in 1716 [DB A-1:301; Shankland's Surveys & Warrants, p.55]. He patented land in Dover Hundred, Kent County, and was taxable there from 1733 to 1765. His son Nehemiah was taxable near him from 1758 to 1765. By his 28 August 1756 Kent County will, proved 16 December 1767, he left his land called "Jolly's Neck" to his youngest son Cornelius (son of Mary), left his gun to his son William, an iron pot to son Jonathan, and his shoemaker's tools to his son Nehemiah. He also named his daughter Naomy (daughter of Mary) [WB L-1:39-40]. The account of the estate named heirs: Cornelius, Naomi, Rhoda, Rachel, and Sarah Handsor [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 238]. His wife Mary apparently died before the will was proved on 16 December 1767 since his wife was called Sarah Hansor when she and (her brother?) John Durham were granted administration on the estate until Cornelius Hansor arrived to the age of seventeen. Sarah, John Durham, William Conselor, and Daniel Durham posted bond for its administration. Sarah was probably "the widow Handser" who was head of a taxable household in Dover Hundred in 1768. She sued her son Cornelius in Kent County court in February 1771 but the case was abated by her death [DSA, RG 3815.031, frame 395]. She died before 8 February 1771 when administration on her estate was granted to her "next of Kin" John Durham [WB L-1, fol. 91]. William was the father of 7 i. William2, born say 1713. 8 ii. Jonathan1, born say 1715. 9 iii. Nehemiah1, born say 1720. iv. ?Jacob1, born say 1721, taxable in Dover Hundred from 1742 to 1751. In 1748 he was a "Malatto" taxable in adjoining Murderkill Hundred. He and Nehemiah Hanser testified in the Kent County trial against "Negro" Phil who was found not guilty of robbing Thomas Parke on 25 August 1749 [Delaware Archives RG 3811.1, 1749-1750, Court for the Trial of Negro Slaves]. He may have died before 1756 when his father made his will. v. Naomi, died before 24 December 1793 according to the account of her father's estate. vi. Cornelius, born say 1752, not yet seventeen years old on 15 February 1768 when Sarah Hansor and John Durham were granted letters of administration of the Kent County estate his father William1 Hansor [WB L-1, fol. 41]. He was indicted by the Kent County court in 1778 to keep the peace [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 685]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County in 1776, taxable on a cow and calf in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, and head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:32]. He died before 6 January 1814 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to William Collins. vii. Rhoda, born say 1764, born after her father made his will on 28 August 1756. She assigned her right to her father's estate to Gabriel Harmon before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621]. viii. Rachel, born say 1768, born after her father's death, called a minor above the age of fourteen years in Orphans' Court on 28 August 1783 [Orphans Court Book C:255]. She was living in Dover Hundred on 11 October 1788 when she sold 200 acres which had been granted to her father William Hansor on 9 November 1734 and laid out for him on 21 November 1737 in the forest of Dover Hundred, called Jolly's Neck, adjoining the main branch of the head of Dover River and Chances Branch [A-2:95]. She was taxable on 87-1/2 acres in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of a St. Jones Hundred household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45]. 4. Thomas1 Hanzer, born say 1693, brought a successful case against Samuel Cary in Sussex County court for assault in November 1727. Richard Poultney withdrew a case against him for debt in Sussex County court in February 1727/8 and he was sued for debt in May 1735 and by Christopher Topham in May 1737. In November 1742 the Sussex County court allowed him ?2 for the support of Ann Oakey. He called himself a house carpenter on 22 March 1743 when he petitioned the Sussex County court to be adjudged a servant to his creditors for three years in order to pay a total of ?50 debt (a not uncommon request). The court agreed and allowed him to retain enough of his earnings to support his family [RG 4815.017, 1707-41, frames 63, 164, 168, 170, 175, 355, 469, 485; 1741-53, frame 153]. He received a warrant for 150 acres in Sussex County on 20 October 1735 and another 205 acres, called "the Addition," in 1754. He sold (signing) to Benjamin Burton land in Indian River Hundred in Long Neck called "Ebonezer ... part of a tract formerly belonging to Rosanna Handzer the mother of the sd Thomas" by deed proved in 1749 [Warrants, C 1776, p.329; DB H-8, 253]. He and his wife Hester registered the birth and baptism of their son Job at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred, in 1753. He made an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County quit claim deed (signing) with William Handzer (who made his mark) for 350 acres on Ivey Branch in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, on 2 February 1773. They called themselves called "Mulattos and yeoman" in the deed for land for which "one Aminadab Handzer Molatto Deceasd" had been granted a patent [DB L-11, 314-5]. Thomas and Hester were the parents of i. Job, born 17 June 1753, baptized 9 December 1753 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 96]. 5. Samuel1 Hanzer, born say 1695, was mentioned in the 16 October 1717 Sussex County will of his brother, Aminidab. He was involved in a fight with Elias Fisher at the widow Johnson's harvest. Fisher claimed in Sussex County court in May 1723 that Samuel struck and kicked him. However, the sheriff testified that Samuel had tried to avoid a confrontation with Fisher, and Albert Jacobs and James Bailey swore that Fisher called Hanser a "Black son of a Bitch" and struck Hanser first. The jury found Samuel not guilty. Perry Fordham sued him for debt in Sussex County court in May 1729, Thomas Stockley, Joseph Pemberton and Richard Poultney sued him in August 1733, Thomas Petty in November 1730, and Serjeant Smythies sued him for debt in august 1736 [RG 4815.017, dockets 1707-41, frames 56, 69, 244, 281, 285, 289, 404, 414, 460]. On 20 May 1733 he and his wife Ann (both signing) sold 124 acres of land in Sussex County which his father had owned and which he had purchased from the administrator of his father's estate. It was described as being on Fishing Creek or Goldsmith Creek, proceeding out of Rehoboth Bay, bordering land of Robert Okey on the south side of Herring Branch, called "Ebenezer." This was land which was part of Aminadab Okey's Sussex County estate. Samuel received a warrant for 200 acres in Sussex County on 20 October 1735 and sold this land, called "Hanzors Lookout," on 13 April 1744 [DB G-7:18-19, 34, 35; Warrants C 1776, p.329; DB H-8:76]. He may have been the father of 10 i. Samuel2, born say 1730. 6. Elias Hanzer, born say 1712, was married to Nancy before 1 April 1747 when their "mulatta" son John was born [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. Thomas and Peter Robinson sued him in Sussex County court in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 292]. Their children were i. John1, born 1 April 1747, married Eliza Norman at Lewes and Cool Springs Presbyterian Church on 21 September 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. He was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1791 and head of an Indian River Hundred household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He left a 7 October 1806 Sussex County will, proved 6 January 1807, leaving his land to his wife Leviney during her widowhood and then to nephew Robert Handser, son of William Handser, and if he died then to John Handser, son of Isaac Handser [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 193; WB F-6:249]. 11 ii. William4, born say 1752. 7. William2 Hanser, born say 1713, purchased 212 acres in Indian River Hundred on the east side of Hanzer's Lookout for ?30 on 7 November 1752 [DB H-8:339-40]. He was called "William Handzer of ye County of Sussex ... Yeoman" when he purchased 200 acres in Sussex County on 4 March 1767. This was land that (his uncle) Samuel1 Handsor had owned from 1735 to 1744. He sold 100 acres of Handsor's Lookout on the west side of Delaware Bay in Indian River Hundred for ?30 on 4 March 1767. He was probably the William Handzer who made an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County quit claim deed with Thomas Handzer, "Mallatos," on 2 February 1773 [DB K-10, 242-3; L-11, 314-5]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County in 1773 and 1774 and taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1777 and 1784. By his 26 October 1784 Sussex County will, proved in 1801, he left a gun to his son David, his land to son Thomas, a bed to son Peter, a bed to wife Jane, and a shilling to grandchildren Aaron, Isabel, Thomas, Elise, and Cary Hanzer and divided the remainder between Elizabeth Roads, Agnes Hanzer, Easter Hanzer, Jane Rigwah and Ann Salmons who was apparently the wife of Henry Sammons. The estate paid Elisabeth Rawles, Nany Rawles, Elizabeth Morris, John Rawles, and David Hodgskin [WB E:312; RG 4545.009, reel 100, frames 107-112]. His children were 12 i. David1, born say 1734. 13 ii. Thomas2, born say 1745. iii. Peter, born say 1750. 8. Jonathan1 Hanser, born say 1715, sued by James Prettyman in Sussex County court in November 1742. The sheriff sold some of his property, including a horse, a sow and pigs and a saddle. Cornelius Stockley sued him, Nehemiah Handzer and Jonathan Handzer, Jr., in court in August 1769 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 72; 1761-71, 510, 582]. He was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Cord Hazard, Jr., on 12 March 1750 [Orphans Court 1744-51, 80]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1789, perhaps the "Jona. Hanzer a poore Melato" who was a delinquent taxable in 1789. He may have been the father of i. Sarah, born say 1748, married Levi Morris, in Sussex County, Delaware, in September 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. 14 ii. Jonathan2, born say 1749. iv. Caleb, a born say 1760, a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1781 and 1782. v. Aminadab3, born say 1763, married Hannah Pettyjohn on 13 November 1784 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 298]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1784 and 1789. Perhaps his widow was Hannah Hansor, head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. 9. Nehemiah1 Hansor, born say 1720, was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1738 to 1785 [Kent County Levy Assessments]. On 16 May 1752 he purchased 80 acres, formerly owned by John Chance, on the northwest side of the main branch of the Dover River in Little Creek Hundred from Nicholas Lockerman (written as Nehemiah Handson) [DB O:213]. He witnessed the 31 January 1757 Kent County will of William Beckett [WB K-1:62]. By his 15 December 1785 Kent County will, proved 20 November 1787, he left his land on the north side of a branch of the Dover River to his son Nehemiah, Jr. (where Nehemiah, Jr., was then living) and left the remainder of his land and estate to his wife Johannah and his two grandchildren Elizabeth and Jemima Handzer. His wife Johannah and "friend" Peter Miller, Sr., were executors [WB M-1, p. 89 - fol. 90]. Johannah was probably the "Widow Handsor" who was charged for John Hagins' tax in Dover Hundred in 1785 [Levy Assessments, frame 45]. She married Sanders Oakey before 12 November 1787 when she and Saunders Oakey were ordered to return an account of her husband's estate [Orphans Court Book D:144]. Nehemiah's children were 15 i. William3, born say 1740. ii. Nehemiah2, born say 1750, taxable in Dover Hundred from 1772 to 1788, called Nehemiah, Jr., from 1772 to 1785. He had an illegitimate male child by Ann Griffin in Dover Hundred about January 1774 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, February 1775 indictments; RG 3805.003, 1735-79, frame 597]. He may have married Amelia Sisco. 10. Samuel2 Hansor, born say 1735, was twenty-four years old when he was listed in the muster of Captain John Wright's Company of Delaware recruits in the French and Indian War on 11 May 1759 [Public Archives Commission, Delaware, 25]. He was married to Comfort Hanzer before 15 April 1770 when their "Melatto" daughter Ann was baptized at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred. He had married Mary before 14 August 1784 when they registered the birth of their son Samuel at St. George's Chapel [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 99, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1791 and head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. He was apparently married to Bridget Hanzer by 7 March 1805 when she and William Rigwaw (signing) administered his estate, valued at ?7 [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 156]. His children were i. Ann, born 16 M(arch?), baptized 15 April 1770. ii. Nisa, born 18 February 1772, "melatto" daughter of Samuel and Comfort Hanzor [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. iii. Samuel3, born 14 August 1784, baptized 31 July 1785. 11. William4 Hanzer, born say 1752, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1787, called "Wm Hanzor of Elas" in 1787 when he was a delinquent taxable, perhaps the Wm. H. Hanzer who was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1789 to 1791. He and his wife Easter/ Hester registered the 15 March 1773 birth of their son, Joshua, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. William was head of an Indian River Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437] and 3 in 1810 [DE:455]. He may have been the William Handzor who died before 24 December 1816 when Jane Handzor was granted administration on his estate [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 122]. William was the father of i. Joshua, born 15 March 1773. ii. Alce, born 3 September 1777, married Nathaniel Morris, "Two free Mulatoes," in Sussex County, Delaware, on 24 December 1799 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315]. iii. Agnes, born 1 February 1784, baptized 31 July 1785 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103, 104]. iv. Robert, son of William and nephew of John Handzer who named him in his 7 October 1806 Sussex County will. 12. David1 Handzer, born say 1734, was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Thomas Waples on 2 September 1766 [Orphans Court 1761-72, 138]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment and died before the February 1780 muster. His administrator received his pay from 1 August 1780 to 1 November 1782 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,358, 54,816, 54,479, 55,180; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196; also NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 496]. On 8 December 1784 (his son?) David Handzer, Jr., was granted administration on his Sussex County estate. He was the father of i. ?David2, born say 1765, a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1787. ii. ?Aaron, born say 1767, a delinquent taxpayer in Indian River in 1787 and a "poore Melato" taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1789, head of an Indian River Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. iii. William5, born say 1769, taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1787 to 1790, called "Wm Hanzer of David" in 1789 when he was a delinquent taxable, probably the William who died intestate about 1804 according to the petition of his widow Susan Durham on 21 February 1821 which stated that he had conveyed a 75 acre tract of land in the forest of Jones Hundred to Jacob Stout on 16 January 1804 while she was still an infant under twenty-one [Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Edmonson to Hopkins, 21].e. iv. ?Mary, born say 1774, married William Harmon, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 311]. 13. Thomas2 Hanzer, born say 1745, was married to Priscilla before 22 April 1784 when they registered the birth of their son Thomas at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. His Sussex County will, proved 18 May 1821, mentioned his sons, Peary, John, Alexander, Nehemiah, and William. They were the parents of i. Jane, born before 1776, wife of Woolsey Foster who was head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:370]. ii. Thomas3, born 22 April 1784, baptized 31 July 1785, married Katherine Jackson, 4 February 1808 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320]. iii. Ann, born 1775-1794, perhaps identical to Nancy Hanzor who married Myers Clark on 26 January 1815 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 325]. iv. Peery, born 5 February, baptized 12 August 1792 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Sussex County, son of Thomas and Priscilla Hanson [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 109], married Mary Butcher in Kent County in 1812. v. John2, born say 1794. vi. Alexander, born say 1796. vii. Nehemiah3. viii. William6. ix. Sarah Lack. 14. Jonathan2 Hanser, born say 1749, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex , (called Jonathan, Jr.) 1770 to 1791 and a "Negro" head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 5 September 1772 birth of their son Jacob and the 23 November 1777 birth of their daughter Jane at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101, 103]. Jonathan and Agnes were the parents of i. Jacob2, born 5 September 1772, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214]. ii. Jane, born 23 November 1777. iii. ?Polly, married Israel Jackson, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. 15. William3 Hanzer, born say 1740, was called William Hanzer, Jr., when he was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1777. He died before 6 March 1784 when his widow Bridget Handzer and William Rigwaw administered his Sussex County estate. The estate was valued at ?11 [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 160]. On 15 December 1785 his father Nehemiah1 Hanser made his will naming grandchildren Elizabeth and Jemima. Elizabeth was called the "daughter of William Handsor deceased" in 1788 when she chose her guardian in orphan's court [Orphans Court Book D:152]. His wife Bridget was head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. William and Bridget were the parents of i. Elizabeth, born say 1773, a minor above the age of fourteen years in 1788 when she chose William Pierce as her guardian in Kent County Orphans Court [Book D:152]. She and her sister Jemima were mentioned in the will of her grandfather, William1 Hansor. She married Benjamin Durham. ii. Jemima, born say 1775. Another member of the family was i. Sibilla/ Isabell, sued Thomas Hanzer, Junr., in a Sussex County court case that was agreed to before coming to court [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1771-93, frame 529]. Endnotes: 1. William Vincent was one of the headrights claimed by Richard Johnson for land in Accomack County in 1652 [Deeds 1651-54, 133]. 2. The Hanser name may have originated with William Anzer, the servant of Daniel Jenifer, whose age was adjudged to be eighteen years by the Accomack County court in 1674 [Deeds 1673-76, 144]. 3. John Hagins may have been related to the mixed-race Hagins family of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. See the Hagins history.
All Fields in This Record
State Virginia
County (Primary) Accomack
Other Counties Sussex, Kent
Family Name Hanser/Hanzer
Family History Notes 1. Mary Vincent, born perhaps 1648, was a neighbor of the Johnson family in Accomack County.(1) In 1665 Richard Johnson and Thomas Tunnell agreed to support Mary's child by Aminadab, a slave of Southy Littleton, a planter on Nandua Creek in Accomack County [DW 1663-66, fol. 91]. The elder Aminadab died before 14 April 1665 when Southy Littleton of Accomack County gave the younger Aminadab "ye sonne of my servant Aminadab negro deceased and Mary Vincent Three cows and there female increase wch were formerly given to my said servant" [DW 1664-71, fol. 20]. On October 1666 Mary married John Okey, and they moved to Somerset County, Maryland, and then to Sussex County, Delaware, with the Johnson family [Torrence, Old Somerset, 399-400, 453, 474]. Mary's child by Aminadab was 2 i. Aminadab1, born about 1664. 2. Aminadab1 Hanzer, born about 1664, apparently adopted the name Hanzer sometime before April 1683 when he recorded his cattle mark in Sussex County, Delaware [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 222]. He was about twenty-four years old in September 1688 when he, John Okey and Mary Okey testified in Sussex County court that they had helped John Barker move his cattle from Accomack County to Sussex County, Delaware. His wife, Rose Hanser, also testified [Court Records 1680-99, 262]. In March 1689/90 he was called "Aminidab Hanger Negro," a twenty-six year old, and his wife was called Rose Hanjaw, an eighteen year old, when they testified in Accomack County court about this same court case in which John Barker was convicted of appropriating seven cattle belonging to William Burton and Thomas Bagwell. Rose testified that in 1684 she lived in John Barker's house on the land of William Burton and Thomas Bagwell [W&cO 1682-97, 181, 181a]. Rose may have been Rose Matthews who testified with Aminadab in another case concerning John Barker which was held in Sussex County court on 8 September 1685 [Court Records 1680-99, 93]. In February 1690 Aminadab acted as attorney for William Burton and Thomas Bagwell in their Sussex County court case, and on 2 September 1696 he and Edward Carey each purchased 200 acres of a 400 acre tract in Sussex County [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 682, 1025-6; DB A-198]. He was found not guilty in Sussex County court of stealing a fishing boat valued at ?20 on 4 November 1706 [RG 4815.017, dockets 1707-41, frame 3]. John Burton mentioned him in his 10 February 1708/9 Sussex County will [de Valinger, Sussex County Probate Records, 21]. He sued Aminadab Oaky (perhaps his half-brother?) in Sussex County court on 3 May 1704 over some damage which their neighbors were ordered to inspect and report back to the court [Horle, Records of Sussex County, 1191]. On 9 April 1713 Aminadab Oaky posted a ?100 security in Sussex County court to guarantee Aminadab Handsor that he would abide by the arbitrators' decision regarding the removal of a fence. He sold his 200 acre tract to Thomas Marriner on 28 May 1715. Aminadab and Rose were still living on 16 October 1717 when their son Aminadab, Jr., mentioned them in his Sussex County will. Aminadab, Sr., died before 8 December 1725 when Rose Hanzer was called the "widow, relict, and administrator of the estate of Aminadab Hanzer...Deceased" in the deed by which for ?33 she sold to Job Barker 150 acres being part of 200 acres (part of a larger tract of 400 acres which Aminadab Hanzer and Edward Carey purchased from Sarah Painter on 3 September 1695). Rose died before 5 May 1752 when their descendants, Bridget Norman, William Handsor "who lives in Kent County" (signing), Samuel Hansor (signing), Elias Hansor, and Mary Brown sold to Benjamin Burton 50 acres which was part of 400 acres in Little Creek Hundred called "Ebonezer ... being the Dwelling place of Rosanna Hanzor Deceased." On 2 February 1773 Thomas and William Handzer, "Mallatos," made a quit claim deed for 350 acres on Ivey Branch which had been granted to "Aminadab Handzer Malatto Deceasd" [DB D-4:225-7; F-6:220-2; H-1, 329-30; L-11, 314-5]. Aminadab and Rose's children were i. Aminadab2, born 23 January 1688/9 [Turner, Records of Sussex County, 146]. He made a Sussex County will on 15 March 1717 leaving a saddle and bridle to his brother Samuel, a yearling steer to his sisters Ann and Mary, and the remainder to his father and mother, Aminidab and Rose Handzer [WB A-1:122]. 3 ii. William1, born say 1692. 4 iii. Thomas1, born say 1693. 5 iv. Samuel1, born say 1695. v. Ann, born say 1710. She may have married Edward Norman, a "mulatto," who baptized his son, Edward, on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92], and they may have been the parents of Bridget Norman who sold land in Sussex County in 1752 "where Rosanna Hanzor formerly lived." vi. Mary, perhaps the Mary Brown who sold land in 1752 where (her mother?) Rosanna Hanzer had lived. 6 vii. Elias, born say 1712. 3. William1 Handsor, born say 1692, purchased 100 acres, called "Bottle and Cake," at the head of Long Neck in Indian River Hundred by deed proved in Sussex County court on 1 November 1715 and recorded a survey for "Bottle & Cake" in 1716 [DB A-1:301; Shankland's Surveys & Warrants, p.55]. He patented land in Dover Hundred, Kent County, and was taxable there from 1733 to 1765. His son Nehemiah was taxable near him from 1758 to 1765. By his 28 August 1756 Kent County will, proved 16 December 1767, he left his land called "Jolly's Neck" to his youngest son Cornelius (son of Mary), left his gun to his son William, an iron pot to son Jonathan, and his shoemaker's tools to his son Nehemiah. He also named his daughter Naomy (daughter of Mary) [WB L-1:39-40]. The account of the estate named heirs: Cornelius, Naomi, Rhoda, Rachel, and Sarah Handsor [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 238]. His wife Mary apparently died before the will was proved on 16 December 1767 since his wife was called Sarah Hansor when she and (her brother?) John Durham were granted administration on the estate until Cornelius Hansor arrived to the age of seventeen. Sarah, John Durham, William Conselor, and Daniel Durham posted bond for its administration. Sarah was probably "the widow Handser" who was head of a taxable household in Dover Hundred in 1768. She sued her son Cornelius in Kent County court in February 1771 but the case was abated by her death [DSA, RG 3815.031, frame 395]. She died before 8 February 1771 when administration on her estate was granted to her "next of Kin" John Durham [WB L-1, fol. 91]. William was the father of 7 i. William2, born say 1713. 8 ii. Jonathan1, born say 1715. 9 iii. Nehemiah1, born say 1720. iv. ?Jacob1, born say 1721, taxable in Dover Hundred from 1742 to 1751. In 1748 he was a "Malatto" taxable in adjoining Murderkill Hundred. He and Nehemiah Hanser testified in the Kent County trial against "Negro" Phil who was found not guilty of robbing Thomas Parke on 25 August 1749 [Delaware Archives RG 3811.1, 1749-1750, Court for the Trial of Negro Slaves]. He may have died before 1756 when his father made his will. v. Naomi, died before 24 December 1793 according to the account of her father's estate. vi. Cornelius, born say 1752, not yet seventeen years old on 15 February 1768 when Sarah Hansor and John Durham were granted letters of administration of the Kent County estate his father William1 Hansor [WB L-1, fol. 41]. He was indicted by the Kent County court in 1778 to keep the peace [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 685]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County in 1776, taxable on a cow and calf in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, and head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:32]. He died before 6 January 1814 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to William Collins. vii. Rhoda, born say 1764, born after her father made his will on 28 August 1756. She assigned her right to her father's estate to Gabriel Harmon before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621]. viii. Rachel, born say 1768, born after her father's death, called a minor above the age of fourteen years in Orphans' Court on 28 August 1783 [Orphans Court Book C:255]. She was living in Dover Hundred on 11 October 1788 when she sold 200 acres which had been granted to her father William Hansor on 9 November 1734 and laid out for him on 21 November 1737 in the forest of Dover Hundred, called Jolly's Neck, adjoining the main branch of the head of Dover River and Chances Branch [A-2:95]. She was taxable on 87-1/2 acres in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of a St. Jones Hundred household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45]. 4. Thomas1 Hanzer, born say 1693, brought a successful case against Samuel Cary in Sussex County court for assault in November 1727. Richard Poultney withdrew a case against him for debt in Sussex County court in February 1727/8 and he was sued for debt in May 1735 and by Christopher Topham in May 1737. In November 1742 the Sussex County court allowed him ?2 for the support of Ann Oakey. He called himself a house carpenter on 22 March 1743 when he petitioned the Sussex County court to be adjudged a servant to his creditors for three years in order to pay a total of ?50 debt (a not uncommon request). The court agreed and allowed him to retain enough of his earnings to support his family [RG 4815.017, 1707-41, frames 63, 164, 168, 170, 175, 355, 469, 485; 1741-53, frame 153]. He received a warrant for 150 acres in Sussex County on 20 October 1735 and another 205 acres, called "the Addition," in 1754. He sold (signing) to Benjamin Burton land in Indian River Hundred in Long Neck called "Ebonezer ... part of a tract formerly belonging to Rosanna Handzer the mother of the sd Thomas" by deed proved in 1749 [Warrants, C 1776, p.329; DB H-8, 253]. He and his wife Hester registered the birth and baptism of their son Job at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred, in 1753. He made an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County quit claim deed (signing) with William Handzer (who made his mark) for 350 acres on Ivey Branch in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, on 2 February 1773. They called themselves called "Mulattos and yeoman" in the deed for land for which "one Aminadab Handzer Molatto Deceasd" had been granted a patent [DB L-11, 314-5]. Thomas and Hester were the parents of i. Job, born 17 June 1753, baptized 9 December 1753 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 96]. 5. Samuel1 Hanzer, born say 1695, was mentioned in the 16 October 1717 Sussex County will of his brother, Aminidab. He was involved in a fight with Elias Fisher at the widow Johnson's harvest. Fisher claimed in Sussex County court in May 1723 that Samuel struck and kicked him. However, the sheriff testified that Samuel had tried to avoid a confrontation with Fisher, and Albert Jacobs and James Bailey swore that Fisher called Hanser a "Black son of a Bitch" and struck Hanser first. The jury found Samuel not guilty. Perry Fordham sued him for debt in Sussex County court in May 1729, Thomas Stockley, Joseph Pemberton and Richard Poultney sued him in August 1733, Thomas Petty in November 1730, and Serjeant Smythies sued him for debt in august 1736 [RG 4815.017, dockets 1707-41, frames 56, 69, 244, 281, 285, 289, 404, 414, 460]. On 20 May 1733 he and his wife Ann (both signing) sold 124 acres of land in Sussex County which his father had owned and which he had purchased from the administrator of his father's estate. It was described as being on Fishing Creek or Goldsmith Creek, proceeding out of Rehoboth Bay, bordering land of Robert Okey on the south side of Herring Branch, called "Ebenezer." This was land which was part of Aminadab Okey's Sussex County estate. Samuel received a warrant for 200 acres in Sussex County on 20 October 1735 and sold this land, called "Hanzors Lookout," on 13 April 1744 [DB G-7:18-19, 34, 35; Warrants C 1776, p.329; DB H-8:76]. He may have been the father of 10 i. Samuel2, born say 1730. 6. Elias Hanzer, born say 1712, was married to Nancy before 1 April 1747 when their "mulatta" son John was born [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. Thomas and Peter Robinson sued him in Sussex County court in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 292]. Their children were i. John1, born 1 April 1747, married Eliza Norman at Lewes and Cool Springs Presbyterian Church on 21 September 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. He was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1791 and head of an Indian River Hundred household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He left a 7 October 1806 Sussex County will, proved 6 January 1807, leaving his land to his wife Leviney during her widowhood and then to nephew Robert Handser, son of William Handser, and if he died then to John Handser, son of Isaac Handser [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 193; WB F-6:249]. 11 ii. William4, born say 1752. 7. William2 Hanser, born say 1713, purchased 212 acres in Indian River Hundred on the east side of Hanzer's Lookout for ?30 on 7 November 1752 [DB H-8:339-40]. He was called "William Handzer of ye County of Sussex ... Yeoman" when he purchased 200 acres in Sussex County on 4 March 1767. This was land that (his uncle) Samuel1 Handsor had owned from 1735 to 1744. He sold 100 acres of Handsor's Lookout on the west side of Delaware Bay in Indian River Hundred for ?30 on 4 March 1767. He was probably the William Handzer who made an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County quit claim deed with Thomas Handzer, "Mallatos," on 2 February 1773 [DB K-10, 242-3; L-11, 314-5]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County in 1773 and 1774 and taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1777 and 1784. By his 26 October 1784 Sussex County will, proved in 1801, he left a gun to his son David, his land to son Thomas, a bed to son Peter, a bed to wife Jane, and a shilling to grandchildren Aaron, Isabel, Thomas, Elise, and Cary Hanzer and divided the remainder between Elizabeth Roads, Agnes Hanzer, Easter Hanzer, Jane Rigwah and Ann Salmons who was apparently the wife of Henry Sammons. The estate paid Elisabeth Rawles, Nany Rawles, Elizabeth Morris, John Rawles, and David Hodgskin [WB E:312; RG 4545.009, reel 100, frames 107-112]. His children were 12 i. David1, born say 1734. 13 ii. Thomas2, born say 1745. iii. Peter, born say 1750. 8. Jonathan1 Hanser, born say 1715, sued by James Prettyman in Sussex County court in November 1742. The sheriff sold some of his property, including a horse, a sow and pigs and a saddle. Cornelius Stockley sued him, Nehemiah Handzer and Jonathan Handzer, Jr., in court in August 1769 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 72; 1761-71, 510, 582]. He was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Cord Hazard, Jr., on 12 March 1750 [Orphans Court 1744-51, 80]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1789, perhaps the "Jona. Hanzer a poore Melato" who was a delinquent taxable in 1789. He may have been the father of i. Sarah, born say 1748, married Levi Morris, in Sussex County, Delaware, in September 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. 14 ii. Jonathan2, born say 1749. iv. Caleb, a born say 1760, a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1781 and 1782. v. Aminadab3, born say 1763, married Hannah Pettyjohn on 13 November 1784 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 298]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1784 and 1789. Perhaps his widow was Hannah Hansor, head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. 9. Nehemiah1 Hansor, born say 1720, was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1738 to 1785 [Kent County Levy Assessments]. On 16 May 1752 he purchased 80 acres, formerly owned by John Chance, on the northwest side of the main branch of the Dover River in Little Creek Hundred from Nicholas Lockerman (written as Nehemiah Handson) [DB O:213]. He witnessed the 31 January 1757 Kent County will of William Beckett [WB K-1:62]. By his 15 December 1785 Kent County will, proved 20 November 1787, he left his land on the north side of a branch of the Dover River to his son Nehemiah, Jr. (where Nehemiah, Jr., was then living) and left the remainder of his land and estate to his wife Johannah and his two grandchildren Elizabeth and Jemima Handzer. His wife Johannah and "friend" Peter Miller, Sr., were executors [WB M-1, p. 89 - fol. 90]. Johannah was probably the "Widow Handsor" who was charged for John Hagins' tax in Dover Hundred in 1785 [Levy Assessments, frame 45]. She married Sanders Oakey before 12 November 1787 when she and Saunders Oakey were ordered to return an account of her husband's estate [Orphans Court Book D:144]. Nehemiah's children were 15 i. William3, born say 1740. ii. Nehemiah2, born say 1750, taxable in Dover Hundred from 1772 to 1788, called Nehemiah, Jr., from 1772 to 1785. He had an illegitimate male child by Ann Griffin in Dover Hundred about January 1774 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, February 1775 indictments; RG 3805.003, 1735-79, frame 597]. He may have married Amelia Sisco. 10. Samuel2 Hansor, born say 1735, was twenty-four years old when he was listed in the muster of Captain John Wright's Company of Delaware recruits in the French and Indian War on 11 May 1759 [Public Archives Commission, Delaware, 25]. He was married to Comfort Hanzer before 15 April 1770 when their "Melatto" daughter Ann was baptized at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred. He had married Mary before 14 August 1784 when they registered the birth of their son Samuel at St. George's Chapel [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 99, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1791 and head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. He was apparently married to Bridget Hanzer by 7 March 1805 when she and William Rigwaw (signing) administered his estate, valued at ?7 [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 156]. His children were i. Ann, born 16 M(arch?), baptized 15 April 1770. ii. Nisa, born 18 February 1772, "melatto" daughter of Samuel and Comfort Hanzor [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. iii. Samuel3, born 14 August 1784, baptized 31 July 1785. 11. William4 Hanzer, born say 1752, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1787, called "Wm Hanzor of Elas" in 1787 when he was a delinquent taxable, perhaps the Wm. H. Hanzer who was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1789 to 1791. He and his wife Easter/ Hester registered the 15 March 1773 birth of their son, Joshua, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. William was head of an Indian River Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437] and 3 in 1810 [DE:455]. He may have been the William Handzor who died before 24 December 1816 when Jane Handzor was granted administration on his estate [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 122]. William was the father of i. Joshua, born 15 March 1773. ii. Alce, born 3 September 1777, married Nathaniel Morris, "Two free Mulatoes," in Sussex County, Delaware, on 24 December 1799 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315]. iii. Agnes, born 1 February 1784, baptized 31 July 1785 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103, 104]. iv. Robert, son of William and nephew of John Handzer who named him in his 7 October 1806 Sussex County will. 12. David1 Handzer, born say 1734, was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Thomas Waples on 2 September 1766 [Orphans Court 1761-72, 138]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment and died before the February 1780 muster. His administrator received his pay from 1 August 1780 to 1 November 1782 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,358, 54,816, 54,479, 55,180; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196; also NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 496]. On 8 December 1784 (his son?) David Handzer, Jr., was granted administration on his Sussex County estate. He was the father of i. ?David2, born say 1765, a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1787. ii. ?Aaron, born say 1767, a delinquent taxpayer in Indian River in 1787 and a "poore Melato" taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1789, head of an Indian River Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. iii. William5, born say 1769, taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1787 to 1790, called "Wm Hanzer of David" in 1789 when he was a delinquent taxable, probably the William who died intestate about 1804 according to the petition of his widow Susan Durham on 21 February 1821 which stated that he had conveyed a 75 acre tract of land in the forest of Jones Hundred to Jacob Stout on 16 January 1804 while she was still an infant under twenty-one [Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Edmonson to Hopkins, 21].e. iv. ?Mary, born say 1774, married William Harmon, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 311]. 13. Thomas2 Hanzer, born say 1745, was married to Priscilla before 22 April 1784 when they registered the birth of their son Thomas at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. His Sussex County will, proved 18 May 1821, mentioned his sons, Peary, John, Alexander, Nehemiah, and William. They were the parents of i. Jane, born before 1776, wife of Woolsey Foster who was head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:370]. ii. Thomas3, born 22 April 1784, baptized 31 July 1785, married Katherine Jackson, 4 February 1808 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320]. iii. Ann, born 1775-1794, perhaps identical to Nancy Hanzor who married Myers Clark on 26 January 1815 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 325]. iv. Peery, born 5 February, baptized 12 August 1792 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Sussex County, son of Thomas and Priscilla Hanson [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 109], married Mary Butcher in Kent County in 1812. v. John2, born say 1794. vi. Alexander, born say 1796. vii. Nehemiah3. viii. William6. ix. Sarah Lack. 14. Jonathan2 Hanser, born say 1749, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex , (called Jonathan, Jr.) 1770 to 1791 and a "Negro" head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 5 September 1772 birth of their son Jacob and the 23 November 1777 birth of their daughter Jane at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101, 103]. Jonathan and Agnes were the parents of i. Jacob2, born 5 September 1772, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214]. ii. Jane, born 23 November 1777. iii. ?Polly, married Israel Jackson, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. 15. William3 Hanzer, born say 1740, was called William Hanzer, Jr., when he was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1777. He died before 6 March 1784 when his widow Bridget Handzer and William Rigwaw administered his Sussex County estate. The estate was valued at ?11 [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 160]. On 15 December 1785 his father Nehemiah1 Hanser made his will naming grandchildren Elizabeth and Jemima. Elizabeth was called the "daughter of William Handsor deceased" in 1788 when she chose her guardian in orphan's court [Orphans Court Book D:152]. His wife Bridget was head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. William and Bridget were the parents of i. Elizabeth, born say 1773, a minor above the age of fourteen years in 1788 when she chose William Pierce as her guardian in Kent County Orphans Court [Book D:152]. She and her sister Jemima were mentioned in the will of her grandfather, William1 Hansor. She married Benjamin Durham. ii. Jemima, born say 1775. Another member of the family was i. Sibilla/ Isabell, sued Thomas Hanzer, Junr., in a Sussex County court case that was agreed to before coming to court [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1771-93, frame 529]. Endnotes: 1. William Vincent was one of the headrights claimed by Richard Johnson for land in Accomack County in 1652 [Deeds 1651-54, 133]. 2. The Hanser name may have originated with William Anzer, the servant of Daniel Jenifer, whose age was adjudged to be eighteen years by the Accomack County court in 1674 [Deeds 1673-76, 144]. 3. John Hagins may have been related to the mixed-race Hagins family of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. See the Hagins history.
Additional Notes
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Family Name Harman
Family History Notes 1. William1 Harman, born about 1632, was called "William Harman Negro" in the court and tax records before and after he became free. He arrived in Virginia as a slave sometime before 1648 when he was claimed as one of the headrights of planters Lewis Burwell and Thomas Vause [Nugent, Cavaliers & Pioneers, I:171-2]. In 1654 he was called the slave of William Andrews when he recorded his purchase of a calf in Northampton County court. William Andrews died about this time and his widow, Mary, married William Smart [DW 1654-55, 38, 85, fol.85]. In 1660 Smart sold William Harman to William Kendall who, on the same day he purchased Harman, agreed to sell him his freedom if he could provide sufficient security for the payment of 5,000 pounds of tobacco within two years [DW 1657-66, 70, 74, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 398-412]. This was 1,000 pounds more than his purchase price. He was still listed in Kendall's household in 1664 and 1665 [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, 15]. In March 1666 he sold a colt to Jane Gossall, the twenty-two-year old daughter of Emmanuel Driggers and widow of free "Negro" John Gossall, and stated in the deed that he intended to make her his wife, promising that the colt would be her sole property as long as she lived [DW 1655-68, pt.2, fol.12]. He had married Jane by June 1666 when he submitted the letters of administration on her first husband's estate to the court. He was head of his own household with his wife Jane in the Northampton County list of tithables from 1667 to 1677 [Orders 1664-74, fol. 24, pp.24, 42; 1674-79, 190]. He appeared to have been equally friendly with slaves, free African Americans, and whites. According to the court deposition of a neighbor, he spent New Years Eve of 1672 drinking rum and sugar with the slaves on John Michael's plantation. He was about forty years old when he made a deposition in court about an argument he had witnessed while at the home of John Francisco [Orders 1664-74, ff. 125, 138, 143, 146, 156a-f, 157]. And in the summer of 1683 there was a court hearing about an argument among six of his white neighbors who were gathered at his house to help him harvest his crop [OW 1683-9, 15-16]. In the summer of 1675 he was involved in a dispute with William Gray over the possession of a gun that once belonged to Francis Payne. Payne's widow Amey had delivered the gun to Harman, perhaps as a gift, and her second husband William Gray, white like her, protested and took it back. The court ordered the gun returned to Harman [OW 1674-79, 58-59]. In September 1673 Jane Harman was the wet nurse for the illegitimate child of Nicholas Silvedo, a Portuguese servant, and English maidservant Mary Gale [Deal, Race and Class, 405]. William and Jane were tithables in their own Northampton County household in 1677. He was about fifty years old on 30 December 1686, called "William Harmon Negro," when he made a deposition about a gun said to be a part of the estate of Edward Jessop, "Maletto" [OW 1674-9, 190; OW 1683-9, 258, 262-3]. William was still living in April 1699 when he recorded the livestock mark of his son Manuel Harman [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. Jane may have been the Jane Harman who bought a "parcel of cloathes" in the 15 June 1700 sale of the estate of Philip Mongon, deceased [Orders 1692-1707, 262]. William and Jane's children were 2 i. Frances, born say 1667. 3 ii. Manuel1, born say 1670. 4 iii. Edward1, born say 1672. iv. John1, born say 1674. 5 v. William2, born say 1676. 2. Frances Harmon, born say 1667, was the mother of an illegitimate child by a white man, Samuel Johnson, in 1685, another in 1686 by Jarvis Cutler, another before 28 May 1688, and another before 1692 [OW 1683-9, 112, 358, 386; OW 1689-98, 160-1]. In May 1690 Thomas Carter was security for her fine of fornication [OW 1689-98, 35, 58]. She married a slave, Anthony George, by 1693 when she recorded her livestock mark in Northampton County court [DW 1651-4, 26 at end of volume]. She may have been the mother of 6 i. Joseph1, born say 1692. 3. Manuel1 Harman, born say 1670, recorded his livestock mark in Northampton County court with his father in April 1699 [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. He was a tenant on land in Accomack County on 7 December 1714 [Orders 1714-17, 2]. He was taxable in Matapany Hundred of Somerset County from 1723 to 1738: with John Harmon in his household in 1729, taxable on Simon Collick in 1736 and 1737 [List of Tithables, 1723-38]. He was about "seventy odd years of age and "almost past Labour" on 19 June 1739 when the Somerset County court granted his petition to be discharged from paying taxes [Judicial Record 1738-40, 121]. He may have been the father of i. John2, born say 1712, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Emanuel Harman in 1729, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, taxable in his own household in 1739 and with his unnamed "melotto" wife in 1740 [List of Tithables]. 4. Edward1 Harman, born say 1672, was living in Northampton County on 8 November 1702 when he and (his brother?) John Harman, Johnson Driggus, John Driggus, and Samuel George, "Free Negroes," were convicted of stealing a hog and then abusing and threatening several whites "in an insolent manner" [Orders 1698-1710, 102, 106]. He purchased 100 acres in Accomack County a few miles from Chincoteague in the northeastern part of the county in 1711. He and his wife Patience sold this land twenty-five years later [DW 1729-37, fol. 235-p.236; Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1333]. On 10 August 1719 he admitted in Accomack County court that he owed William Johnson 7-1/2 bushels of Indian corn [Orders 1717-19, 1]. He may have been identical to Edward Harman who was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1738 to 1740. Edward and Patience may have been the ancestors of some of the family members who were in Maryland and Delaware: i. Zachariah, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in William Smith's household in 1733, in Ursley Greer's household (with William Harman) in 1734, in Presgrave William's household in 1735, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, in Edward Harman's household in 1738, and in Edward Franklin's household in 1739. 7 ii. William3, born say 1715. iii. John2, born say 1718, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737 and taxable in 1740 in his own household with his unnamed "melotto" wife in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County. iv. Edward3, born say 1720, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of (his brother?) William Harman in 1739 and the household of (his father?) Edward Harman in 1740. v. Jane, born say 1722, living in All Hollow's Parish, Somerset County, in June 1738 when she was indicted for having an illegitimate child. She was found not guilty. Edward Harmon, planter, was her security for the payment of court fees [Judicial Record 1738-40, 43]. She was a taxable "mulato" in the Bogerternorten Hundred household of Robert Warren in 1740 [1740 Tax List]. On 18 November 1740 she was again indicted for having an illegitimate child, but this time confessed that John Jackson was the father. Robert Warren was her security [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310]. 8 vi. Daniel1, born say 1725. 9 vii. Job, born say 1726. 5. William2 Harman, born say 1676, was a "Negro" tithable head of his own Northampton County household from 1720 to 1725 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 2, 13, 24, 36, 51, 68, 73]. He was called William Harmon "Negro" in December 1721 when he paid Hannah Carter's fine of 500 pounds of tobacco and indemnified the parish from any charge from her illegitimate child [Orders 1719-22, 144, 146]. He died without making a will before 12 January 1725/6 when his children Jane and Edward Harman chose Philip Mongon as their guardian. His estate was valued at ?32 [Orders 1722-9, 226; DW 1725-33, 32]. His children were i. ?Dinah Mongon, wife of Philip Mongon. 10 ii. Jane, born about 1706. iii. Edward2, born say 1707, a "Negro" tithable in his father's Northampton County household in 1723 and 1724. He was tithable in Philip Mongon's household in 1726, a "negro" tithable in Matthew Welch's household from 1727 to 1731, and tithable in the household of Henry Speakman from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 36, 51, 73, 102, 118, 170, 212, 221, 255, 276, 292, 304, 361]. He sued Philip Mongon for his part of his father's estate on 11 July 1727, and he was sued by Daniel Jacob on 11 October 1727 [Orders 1722-9, 285, 299]. iv. ?Nan, born say 1710, a "negro" taxable in Thomas Moor's Northampton County household from 1726 to 1728 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 107, 132]. v. ?Jeffry, born say 1712, taxable in Abraham Bowker's Northampton County household in 1727 and 1728. vi. ?George1, born about 1717, a ten-year-old "orphan Mulatto" bound apprentice in Accomack County on 5 March 1727 to Jeptha Perry and then bound instead to Benjamin Salmon on 3 August 1736 when Salmon complained to the court that Perry neither taught him a trade nor "put him to School" [Orders 1724-31, 95a; 1731-36, 190]. On 30 September 1766 the Accomack County court ordered that he be added to the list of tithables [Orders 1765-67, 235]. 6. Joseph1 Harmon, born say 1692, was sued by John McKeel in Princess Anne County court on 4 January 1726/7 [Orders 1717-28, 272]. He left a 23 January 1737/8 Princess Anne County, Virginia will, proved 4 April 1739 by which he left a cow, hogs, a gun, sword, bed and furniture to his son Joseph Harman when he came of age; left a cow, calf, hogs, and furniture to his daughter Mary when she came to age sixteen; and made his wife Elizabeth executrix [DB 1735-40, 355/357]. He was the father of 11 i. Joseph2, born say 1725. ii. Mary, born say 1727. 7. William3 Harman, born say 1715, was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in Ursley Greer's household in 1734, in Robert Warren's household in 1737, in his own household from 1738 to 1739 (with his brother? Edward Harman), and taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred with his wife Betty in 1740 "by order of Court" [List of Taxables]. Worcester County was formed from this part of Somerset County in 1742, so his descendants may have been those members of the family counted as "other free" in Worcester County. He and William Butcher owned land adjoining Nathan Brittingham in Broadkill Hundred, 15 miles southwest of Lewes, on 30 April 1759 when Brittingham sold the land to Solomon Parrimore [DB I-9:239]. Jonathan Vaughan sued him and Joshua Bucher in Sussex County court in February 1764 with Daniel Nunez as security for his costs, and Joshua Rocher sued him in August 1764. His death was suggested when the Vaughan's case against him came before the court in May 1768. Perhaps his widow was Tabitha Harmon who was sued by Robert Lacey in May 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 130, 146, 165, 205, 275, 407, 428, 446, 480, 512, 549, 562, 567, 575]. He may have been the ancestor of i. Jeremiah, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124]. ii. Abel, purchased 50 acres in Worcester County called "Scarborough's Castle" adjoining Samuel and Kendall Scarborough for ?50 on 11 February 1791 [DB O:67-8]. On 26 February 1799 he and Edward Scarborough posted bond of ?30 to indemnify the county of Worcester against any charges from an illegitimate child Abel had by Jenny Handby free single woman [DB T:140-1]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:744]. iii. Sophia, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830]. iv. Sally, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:745]. v. Lazarus, born about 1758, served in the 6th Company of the 1st Maryland Regiment from 1 August 1780 to 15 November 1783 [Archives of Maryland 18:356, 539]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124], 9 in 1800 [MD:745] and 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:623]. He mortgaged two cows, two heifers, two calves, seven sheep and a sow to James B. Robins for $130 by Worcester County deed on 24 October 1803 [DB W:2]. He made a declaration in Worcester County court on 10 April 1818 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. On 28 July 1821 he stated that he was about sixty years old and was living with his wife Betty and their sons John, aged 18 years, and Joseph, aged 12 years [NARA, S.34911, M805, Roll 399; M804, Roll 1192, frame 297 of 1046, ancestry.com]. vi. Jacob, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Elizabeth, a 60-year-old woman from Somerset County who emigrated to Liberia in 1832 aboard the Lafayette with (her son?) Nathan G. Harman, a farmer, and his family [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390]. viii. Levin, born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612] and 4 "free colored" in 1830. ix. Daniel3, head of a Worcester County household 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612]. 8. Daniel1 Harman, born say 1725, was a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware taxable from 1766 to 1773. He died before 10 May 1774 when his widow Elizabeth was granted administration of his Kent County, Delaware estate. She married Joseph Lantern [de Valinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 289]. Daniel may have been the father of i. Daniel2, a "Mulatto" taxable in the Kent County Levy Assessments circa 1820. ii. Gabriel, born say 1760, married Rhoda Hanser. She assigned her right to the estate of her father, William Handsor, to Gabriel before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621]. Gabriel was a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1787 and in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 80, 98, 475, 515], head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 "free colored" in Dover in 1820 [DE:36]. 9. Job Harman, born about 1725, was a twenty-one-year-old born in Sussex County who was listed in the muster of Captain John Shannon's Company of foot solders in King George's War in September 1746 [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He had an account with merchant John Shannon for about ?12.18 for items such as a checked shirt and for cash paid to Mr. Curry in Shannon's account book which is found in the Kent County court dockets [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 642]. He was the father of Jemima who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River, on 16 April 1750. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for an unspecified offense in February 1759 that was continued through August 1762. John Lockwood sued him in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 496, 516, 534, 555, 594, 622; 1761-1771, 17, 41, 72, 85, 109, 287, 376, 404]. He was probably married to Comfort and they were probably the parents of Shepherd Harmon: "Mulattoes: Shepherd son of Job and Comfort _____ b. 15 Apr 177(2)" at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95, 101]. They were the parents of i. Jemima, daughter of Job Harmon baptized same day (16 April 1750) at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95]. ii. ?Eunice, born say 1752, married Southy Pride, "mulattoes," on 13 May 1772 at Lewes and Coolsprings Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 126]. 12 iii. ?Edward, born about 1758. iv. William4, born say 1770, married Mary Hanser "Free mulattoes" on 11 May 1795 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 135]. He was a "Negro" taxable in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of an Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437], 5 "other free" in Cedar Creek Hundred in 1810 [DE:303], and 9 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:220]. v. Shepherd, born 15 April 177_ (probably 1772), "mulatto" son of Job and Comfort ___. He married Lina Oakey, "free Mulattoes," on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458]. vi. ?Adonijah, married Sarah Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 19 January 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310]. vii. ?Kesiah, married Aron Esaw, "Malattoes," on 25 February 1790 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 305]. Aaron Nezor was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. 10. Jane Harmon, born about 1706, was a "Negro" tithable in Philip Mongon's Northampton County household in 1726 and 1727 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 102, 119]. She was twenty-one years old in February 1727/8 when she petitioned the Northampton County court to allow her to take control of the remaining part of her father's estate which was then in the hands of her guardian Dinah Mongong, widow and executrix of Philip Mongong. The court ordered Dinah to pay Jane her share of her deceased father's estate [L.P Pk#12, February 1727/8; Orders 1722-9, 316, 317]. Jane was tithable in the household of Richard Malavery (Dinah's second husband) from 1728 to 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 135, 148, 169, 221]. She had an illegitimate child before 11 December 1733. She petitioned the court for her estate which was in the hands of Richard Malavery, and on 9 January 1733/4 the court appointed Colonel John Robins and Mr. William Stott to inspect the appraisement of the estate and to be present when Richard Munlavery delivered it to her, "that she may not be wronged" [Orders 1732-42, 87, 88, 89]. She may have been the Jane Harmon who was living in Accomack County on 25 April 1749 when several of her children: Elijah, Harman, Solomon, and Nimrod were bound as apprentice shoemakers [Orders 1744-53, 327]. She was called "Jane Harmon free Negro" in April 1758 when the Northampton County court released her from paying taxes in the future [Minutes 1754-61, 156]. Her children were 13 i. ?John3, born say 1732. 14 ii. ?Emanuel2, born say 1733. iii. Elijah, born about 1735, a fourteen-year-old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749. iv. Harman, born about 1738, an eleven-year-old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749. v. Solomon, born about 1743, a six-year-old bound out on 25 April 1749. vi. Nimrod, born about 1747, a two-year-old bound out on in Accomack County on 25 April 1749, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124]. vii. ?Jemima, born say 1749, a "free Negro" living in Accomack County on 4 July 1768 when the court presented her for not listing herself as a tithable [Orders 1768-9, 227]. 11. Joseph2 Harmon, born say 1725, died before 17 January 1752 when the audit of his Princess Anne County estate was taken. The sale of the estate totaled ?36.19 [DB 1747-55, 297]. He may have been the father of 15 i. James, born say 1755. ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. iii. Craftshoe, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806]. Shoecraft Harmon recorded a plat for 97 acres on the Pee Dee River near Marrs Bluff in Georgetown District, South Carolina, on 1 July 1793 [South Carolina Archives, Series S13190, 30:118]. iv. Jaca, born about 1779, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 57, 5'4", a mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County. She was probably the mother of Sally Harman who registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 5'2", age 20, a Bright Mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, nos. 263, 393] 12. Edward4 Harman, born about 1758, received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolution [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,359; 54,480; 54,860; 54,935; 55,181; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He married Agnes Jackson on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 11 January 1792 birth of their son Benjamin at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Sussex County. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 8 in 1810 [DE:437] and 5 "free colored" in Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:308]. He was about sixty years old on 20 April 1818 when he appeared in Sussex County court to make a declcaration to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary War. He stated that he enlisted under Captain Kirkwood in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in 1777. Mitchell Kirkwood, Lieutenant Colonel of the Ninth Delaware Regiment, testified in his favor. Hezekiah Lacey testified that Edward worked for his father when he enlisted. He was about seventy and a resident of Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on 16 November 1820 when he stated that had a wife named Agnes who was about fifty, a twenty-five-year-old son Benjamin and a twenty-three-year-old son Dirickson who did not live with him, a twenty-one-year-old son Paynter, twelve-year-old son Woolsey and a ten-year-old daughter Eliza [NARA, S.36000, microfilm M805, Roll 399; M804, Roll 1192, frame 514 of 1046 and https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22756535]. Edward and Agnes were the parents of i. Benjamin, born 11 January 1792, "son of Edward and Agness" [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 110]. ii. Dirickson, born about 1797. iii. Paynter, born about 1800. iv. Woolsey, born about 1808. v. Eliza, born about 1810. 13. John2 Harmon, born say 1727, was taxable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1743 and 1744 [L.P. 1743, 1744] and head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" and one white man over 16 years of age in 1790 [NC:63] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316]. On 30 October 1795 he sold 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle, and hogs in Halifax County to Joseph Lantern, Moses Matthews, and John Kelly [DB 17:920] and sold 100 acres near the road from Halifax Town to Enfield old courthouse to Joseph Lantern on 3 December 1795 [DB 18:130]. (Joseph Lantern was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1776 to 1785.) John may have been the father of i. James, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He may have been identical to Craftshoe Harmon, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806]. ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. iii. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51]. iv. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101]. 14. Emanuel2 Harmon, born say 1733, was sued in Northampton County by John Wilkins, Sr., on 15 May 1754. He was called a "free Negro" on 10 June 1760 when the court ordered him sent to the General Court to be tried for receiving stolen goods from a slave named Will who belonged to the estate of Benjamin Stratton [Orders 1753-8, 100; Minutes 1754-61, 223]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 8 in 1810 [VA:29]. He was the father of i. George2, born say 1755, taxable in Accomack County from 1782 to 1813: taxable on 2 free males, 2 slaves and 5 horses in 1782; 2 free males in 1798; called a "fn" in 1806 and 1812; called "Geo: Harmon (of Emawell)" in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813. His son George was called "of George" in 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 8, 149, 248, 314, 378, 447, 630, 791, 835]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:29]. He served as a soldier in the Revolution. His only heirs Betsy, Comfort, Leah and Sarah Harmon applied for a pension for his service in Accomack County court on 25 September 1832 [Orders 1832-36, 16]. Leah Harmon (over the age of 45) was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820. 15. James Harman, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1783 to 1811: in the list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" from 1801 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 415, 450, 592; 1791-1812, frames 8, 191, 400, 548, 636, 716]. On 4 December 1809 he purchased land on Tanner's Creek which was land he was then living on from the widow of William Holland for $69.38 [DB 45:4]. On 21 August 1821 Kinner Shewcraft sued James Harman (Jr.) and his wife Lucy and a minor named Andrew Shewcraft in Norfolk County court to force the sale of land formerly belonging to Moses Shewcraft. The court ordered the proceeds divided equally among the plaintiff and defendants [Minutes 17:141]. Lucy was apparently identical to Lucy Herman who registered in Norfolk County on 15 December 1828: age 28, 4 11-/34, a bright mulatto, Born free. James and Lucy Harman's descendants were considered Indians in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 489, 1230, 1599, 1600]. i. Jaca, born about 1779, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 57, a mulatto woman, born free, perhaps the mother of Sally Harman who registered on 3 October 1831: 5'2" high, age 20, a Bright Mulatto woman, born free [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 263, 393]. ii. James2, born say, a "F.Blk."/ "free negro" taxable in Princess Anne County from 1807 to 1822 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 365, 438, 486, 502, 546, 701, 682, 701]. His wife Lucy Herman registered in Norfolk County on 15 December 1828: age 28, 4 11-/34, a bright mulatto, Born free. James and Lucy Harman's descendants were considered Indians in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 489, 1230, 1599, 1600]. Other members of the Harmon family were i. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51]. ii. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101]. iii. Southey, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108]. iv. Stephen, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100]. v. Ann, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108]. vi. Scarburgh, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:101]. vii. Molly/ Mary, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:157] and 7 in 1810 [VA:102]. viii. Easter, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:30]. ix. Emanuel3, born about 1789, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: a light Black, 5 feet 7-1/2 Inches...Born free [Free Negro Register, #5].
All Fields in This Record
State Virginia
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Accomack, Somerset, Sussex, Kent,
Family Name Harman
Family History Notes 1. William1 Harman, born about 1632, was called "William Harman Negro" in the court and tax records before and after he became free. He arrived in Virginia as a slave sometime before 1648 when he was claimed as one of the headrights of planters Lewis Burwell and Thomas Vause [Nugent, Cavaliers & Pioneers, I:171-2]. In 1654 he was called the slave of William Andrews when he recorded his purchase of a calf in Northampton County court. William Andrews died about this time and his widow, Mary, married William Smart [DW 1654-55, 38, 85, fol.85]. In 1660 Smart sold William Harman to William Kendall who, on the same day he purchased Harman, agreed to sell him his freedom if he could provide sufficient security for the payment of 5,000 pounds of tobacco within two years [DW 1657-66, 70, 74, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 398-412]. This was 1,000 pounds more than his purchase price. He was still listed in Kendall's household in 1664 and 1665 [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, 15]. In March 1666 he sold a colt to Jane Gossall, the twenty-two-year old daughter of Emmanuel Driggers and widow of free "Negro" John Gossall, and stated in the deed that he intended to make her his wife, promising that the colt would be her sole property as long as she lived [DW 1655-68, pt.2, fol.12]. He had married Jane by June 1666 when he submitted the letters of administration on her first husband's estate to the court. He was head of his own household with his wife Jane in the Northampton County list of tithables from 1667 to 1677 [Orders 1664-74, fol. 24, pp.24, 42; 1674-79, 190]. He appeared to have been equally friendly with slaves, free African Americans, and whites. According to the court deposition of a neighbor, he spent New Years Eve of 1672 drinking rum and sugar with the slaves on John Michael's plantation. He was about forty years old when he made a deposition in court about an argument he had witnessed while at the home of John Francisco [Orders 1664-74, ff. 125, 138, 143, 146, 156a-f, 157]. And in the summer of 1683 there was a court hearing about an argument among six of his white neighbors who were gathered at his house to help him harvest his crop [OW 1683-9, 15-16]. In the summer of 1675 he was involved in a dispute with William Gray over the possession of a gun that once belonged to Francis Payne. Payne's widow Amey had delivered the gun to Harman, perhaps as a gift, and her second husband William Gray, white like her, protested and took it back. The court ordered the gun returned to Harman [OW 1674-79, 58-59]. In September 1673 Jane Harman was the wet nurse for the illegitimate child of Nicholas Silvedo, a Portuguese servant, and English maidservant Mary Gale [Deal, Race and Class, 405]. William and Jane were tithables in their own Northampton County household in 1677. He was about fifty years old on 30 December 1686, called "William Harmon Negro," when he made a deposition about a gun said to be a part of the estate of Edward Jessop, "Maletto" [OW 1674-9, 190; OW 1683-9, 258, 262-3]. William was still living in April 1699 when he recorded the livestock mark of his son Manuel Harman [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. Jane may have been the Jane Harman who bought a "parcel of cloathes" in the 15 June 1700 sale of the estate of Philip Mongon, deceased [Orders 1692-1707, 262]. William and Jane's children were 2 i. Frances, born say 1667. 3 ii. Manuel1, born say 1670. 4 iii. Edward1, born say 1672. iv. John1, born say 1674. 5 v. William2, born say 1676. 2. Frances Harmon, born say 1667, was the mother of an illegitimate child by a white man, Samuel Johnson, in 1685, another in 1686 by Jarvis Cutler, another before 28 May 1688, and another before 1692 [OW 1683-9, 112, 358, 386; OW 1689-98, 160-1]. In May 1690 Thomas Carter was security for her fine of fornication [OW 1689-98, 35, 58]. She married a slave, Anthony George, by 1693 when she recorded her livestock mark in Northampton County court [DW 1651-4, 26 at end of volume]. She may have been the mother of 6 i. Joseph1, born say 1692. 3. Manuel1 Harman, born say 1670, recorded his livestock mark in Northampton County court with his father in April 1699 [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. He was a tenant on land in Accomack County on 7 December 1714 [Orders 1714-17, 2]. He was taxable in Matapany Hundred of Somerset County from 1723 to 1738: with John Harmon in his household in 1729, taxable on Simon Collick in 1736 and 1737 [List of Tithables, 1723-38]. He was about "seventy odd years of age and "almost past Labour" on 19 June 1739 when the Somerset County court granted his petition to be discharged from paying taxes [Judicial Record 1738-40, 121]. He may have been the father of i. John2, born say 1712, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Emanuel Harman in 1729, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, taxable in his own household in 1739 and with his unnamed "melotto" wife in 1740 [List of Tithables]. 4. Edward1 Harman, born say 1672, was living in Northampton County on 8 November 1702 when he and (his brother?) John Harman, Johnson Driggus, John Driggus, and Samuel George, "Free Negroes," were convicted of stealing a hog and then abusing and threatening several whites "in an insolent manner" [Orders 1698-1710, 102, 106]. He purchased 100 acres in Accomack County a few miles from Chincoteague in the northeastern part of the county in 1711. He and his wife Patience sold this land twenty-five years later [DW 1729-37, fol. 235-p.236; Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1333]. On 10 August 1719 he admitted in Accomack County court that he owed William Johnson 7-1/2 bushels of Indian corn [Orders 1717-19, 1]. He may have been identical to Edward Harman who was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1738 to 1740. Edward and Patience may have been the ancestors of some of the family members who were in Maryland and Delaware: i. Zachariah, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in William Smith's household in 1733, in Ursley Greer's household (with William Harman) in 1734, in Presgrave William's household in 1735, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, in Edward Harman's household in 1738, and in Edward Franklin's household in 1739. 7 ii. William3, born say 1715. iii. John2, born say 1718, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737 and taxable in 1740 in his own household with his unnamed "melotto" wife in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County. iv. Edward3, born say 1720, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of (his brother?) William Harman in 1739 and the household of (his father?) Edward Harman in 1740. v. Jane, born say 1722, living in All Hollow's Parish, Somerset County, in June 1738 when she was indicted for having an illegitimate child. She was found not guilty. Edward Harmon, planter, was her security for the payment of court fees [Judicial Record 1738-40, 43]. She was a taxable "mulato" in the Bogerternorten Hundred household of Robert Warren in 1740 [1740 Tax List]. On 18 November 1740 she was again indicted for having an illegitimate child, but this time confessed that John Jackson was the father. Robert Warren was her security [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310]. 8 vi. Daniel1, born say 1725. 9 vii. Job, born say 1726. 5. William2 Harman, born say 1676, was a "Negro" tithable head of his own Northampton County household from 1720 to 1725 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 2, 13, 24, 36, 51, 68, 73]. He was called William Harmon "Negro" in December 1721 when he paid Hannah Carter's fine of 500 pounds of tobacco and indemnified the parish from any charge from her illegitimate child [Orders 1719-22, 144, 146]. He died without making a will before 12 January 1725/6 when his children Jane and Edward Harman chose Philip Mongon as their guardian. His estate was valued at ?32 [Orders 1722-9, 226; DW 1725-33, 32]. His children were i. ?Dinah Mongon, wife of Philip Mongon. 10 ii. Jane, born about 1706. iii. Edward2, born say 1707, a "Negro" tithable in his father's Northampton County household in 1723 and 1724. He was tithable in Philip Mongon's household in 1726, a "negro" tithable in Matthew Welch's household from 1727 to 1731, and tithable in the household of Henry Speakman from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 36, 51, 73, 102, 118, 170, 212, 221, 255, 276, 292, 304, 361]. He sued Philip Mongon for his part of his father's estate on 11 July 1727, and he was sued by Daniel Jacob on 11 October 1727 [Orders 1722-9, 285, 299]. iv. ?Nan, born say 1710, a "negro" taxable in Thomas Moor's Northampton County household from 1726 to 1728 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 107, 132]. v. ?Jeffry, born say 1712, taxable in Abraham Bowker's Northampton County household in 1727 and 1728. vi. ?George1, born about 1717, a ten-year-old "orphan Mulatto" bound apprentice in Accomack County on 5 March 1727 to Jeptha Perry and then bound instead to Benjamin Salmon on 3 August 1736 when Salmon complained to the court that Perry neither taught him a trade nor "put him to School" [Orders 1724-31, 95a; 1731-36, 190]. On 30 September 1766 the Accomack County court ordered that he be added to the list of tithables [Orders 1765-67, 235]. 6. Joseph1 Harmon, born say 1692, was sued by John McKeel in Princess Anne County court on 4 January 1726/7 [Orders 1717-28, 272]. He left a 23 January 1737/8 Princess Anne County, Virginia will, proved 4 April 1739 by which he left a cow, hogs, a gun, sword, bed and furniture to his son Joseph Harman when he came of age; left a cow, calf, hogs, and furniture to his daughter Mary when she came to age sixteen; and made his wife Elizabeth executrix [DB 1735-40, 355/357]. He was the father of 11 i. Joseph2, born say 1725. ii. Mary, born say 1727. 7. William3 Harman, born say 1715, was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in Ursley Greer's household in 1734, in Robert Warren's household in 1737, in his own household from 1738 to 1739 (with his brother? Edward Harman), and taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred with his wife Betty in 1740 "by order of Court" [List of Taxables]. Worcester County was formed from this part of Somerset County in 1742, so his descendants may have been those members of the family counted as "other free" in Worcester County. He and William Butcher owned land adjoining Nathan Brittingham in Broadkill Hundred, 15 miles southwest of Lewes, on 30 April 1759 when Brittingham sold the land to Solomon Parrimore [DB I-9:239]. Jonathan Vaughan sued him and Joshua Bucher in Sussex County court in February 1764 with Daniel Nunez as security for his costs, and Joshua Rocher sued him in August 1764. His death was suggested when the Vaughan's case against him came before the court in May 1768. Perhaps his widow was Tabitha Harmon who was sued by Robert Lacey in May 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 130, 146, 165, 205, 275, 407, 428, 446, 480, 512, 549, 562, 567, 575]. He may have been the ancestor of i. Jeremiah, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124]. ii. Abel, purchased 50 acres in Worcester County called "Scarborough's Castle" adjoining Samuel and Kendall Scarborough for ?50 on 11 February 1791 [DB O:67-8]. On 26 February 1799 he and Edward Scarborough posted bond of ?30 to indemnify the county of Worcester against any charges from an illegitimate child Abel had by Jenny Handby free single woman [DB T:140-1]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:744]. iii. Sophia, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830]. iv. Sally, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:745]. v. Lazarus, born about 1758, served in the 6th Company of the 1st Maryland Regiment from 1 August 1780 to 15 November 1783 [Archives of Maryland 18:356, 539]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124], 9 in 1800 [MD:745] and 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:623]. He mortgaged two cows, two heifers, two calves, seven sheep and a sow to James B. Robins for $130 by Worcester County deed on 24 October 1803 [DB W:2]. He made a declaration in Worcester County court on 10 April 1818 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. On 28 July 1821 he stated that he was about sixty years old and was living with his wife Betty and their sons John, aged 18 years, and Joseph, aged 12 years [NARA, S.34911, M805, Roll 399; M804, Roll 1192, frame 297 of 1046, ancestry.com]. vi. Jacob, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Elizabeth, a 60-year-old woman from Somerset County who emigrated to Liberia in 1832 aboard the Lafayette with (her son?) Nathan G. Harman, a farmer, and his family [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390]. viii. Levin, born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612] and 4 "free colored" in 1830. ix. Daniel3, head of a Worcester County household 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612]. 8. Daniel1 Harman, born say 1725, was a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware taxable from 1766 to 1773. He died before 10 May 1774 when his widow Elizabeth was granted administration of his Kent County, Delaware estate. She married Joseph Lantern [de Valinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 289]. Daniel may have been the father of i. Daniel2, a "Mulatto" taxable in the Kent County Levy Assessments circa 1820. ii. Gabriel, born say 1760, married Rhoda Hanser. She assigned her right to the estate of her father, William Handsor, to Gabriel before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621]. Gabriel was a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1787 and in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 80, 98, 475, 515], head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 "free colored" in Dover in 1820 [DE:36]. 9. Job Harman, born about 1725, was a twenty-one-year-old born in Sussex County who was listed in the muster of Captain John Shannon's Company of foot solders in King George's War in September 1746 [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He had an account with merchant John Shannon for about ?12.18 for items such as a checked shirt and for cash paid to Mr. Curry in Shannon's account book which is found in the Kent County court dockets [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 642]. He was the father of Jemima who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River, on 16 April 1750. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for an unspecified offense in February 1759 that was continued through August 1762. John Lockwood sued him in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 496, 516, 534, 555, 594, 622; 1761-1771, 17, 41, 72, 85, 109, 287, 376, 404]. He was probably married to Comfort and they were probably the parents of Shepherd Harmon: "Mulattoes: Shepherd son of Job and Comfort _____ b. 15 Apr 177(2)" at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95, 101]. They were the parents of i. Jemima, daughter of Job Harmon baptized same day (16 April 1750) at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95]. ii. ?Eunice, born say 1752, married Southy Pride, "mulattoes," on 13 May 1772 at Lewes and Coolsprings Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 126]. 12 iii. ?Edward, born about 1758. iv. William4, born say 1770, married Mary Hanser "Free mulattoes" on 11 May 1795 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 135]. He was a "Negro" taxable in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of an Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437], 5 "other free" in Cedar Creek Hundred in 1810 [DE:303], and 9 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:220]. v. Shepherd, born 15 April 177_ (probably 1772), "mulatto" son of Job and Comfort ___. He married Lina Oakey, "free Mulattoes," on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458]. vi. ?Adonijah, married Sarah Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 19 January 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310]. vii. ?Kesiah, married Aron Esaw, "Malattoes," on 25 February 1790 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 305]. Aaron Nezor was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. 10. Jane Harmon, born about 1706, was a "Negro" tithable in Philip Mongon's Northampton County household in 1726 and 1727 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 102, 119]. She was twenty-one years old in February 1727/8 when she petitioned the Northampton County court to allow her to take control of the remaining part of her father's estate which was then in the hands of her guardian Dinah Mongong, widow and executrix of Philip Mongong. The court ordered Dinah to pay Jane her share of her deceased father's estate [L.P Pk#12, February 1727/8; Orders 1722-9, 316, 317]. Jane was tithable in the household of Richard Malavery (Dinah's second husband) from 1728 to 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 135, 148, 169, 221]. She had an illegitimate child before 11 December 1733. She petitioned the court for her estate which was in the hands of Richard Malavery, and on 9 January 1733/4 the court appointed Colonel John Robins and Mr. William Stott to inspect the appraisement of the estate and to be present when Richard Munlavery delivered it to her, "that she may not be wronged" [Orders 1732-42, 87, 88, 89]. She may have been the Jane Harmon who was living in Accomack County on 25 April 1749 when several of her children: Elijah, Harman, Solomon, and Nimrod were bound as apprentice shoemakers [Orders 1744-53, 327]. She was called "Jane Harmon free Negro" in April 1758 when the Northampton County court released her from paying taxes in the future [Minutes 1754-61, 156]. Her children were 13 i. ?John3, born say 1732. 14 ii. ?Emanuel2, born say 1733. iii. Elijah, born about 1735, a fourteen-year-old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749. iv. Harman, born about 1738, an eleven-year-old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749. v. Solomon, born about 1743, a six-year-old bound out on 25 April 1749. vi. Nimrod, born about 1747, a two-year-old bound out on in Accomack County on 25 April 1749, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124]. vii. ?Jemima, born say 1749, a "free Negro" living in Accomack County on 4 July 1768 when the court presented her for not listing herself as a tithable [Orders 1768-9, 227]. 11. Joseph2 Harmon, born say 1725, died before 17 January 1752 when the audit of his Princess Anne County estate was taken. The sale of the estate totaled ?36.19 [DB 1747-55, 297]. He may have been the father of 15 i. James, born say 1755. ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. iii. Craftshoe, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806]. Shoecraft Harmon recorded a plat for 97 acres on the Pee Dee River near Marrs Bluff in Georgetown District, South Carolina, on 1 July 1793 [South Carolina Archives, Series S13190, 30:118]. iv. Jaca, born about 1779, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 57, 5'4", a mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County. She was probably the mother of Sally Harman who registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 5'2", age 20, a Bright Mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, nos. 263, 393] 12. Edward4 Harman, born about 1758, received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolution [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,359; 54,480; 54,860; 54,935; 55,181; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He married Agnes Jackson on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 11 January 1792 birth of their son Benjamin at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Sussex County. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 8 in 1810 [DE:437] and 5 "free colored" in Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:308]. He was about sixty years old on 20 April 1818 when he appeared in Sussex County court to make a declcaration to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary War. He stated that he enlisted under Captain Kirkwood in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in 1777. Mitchell Kirkwood, Lieutenant Colonel of the Ninth Delaware Regiment, testified in his favor. Hezekiah Lacey testified that Edward worked for his father when he enlisted. He was about seventy and a resident of Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on 16 November 1820 when he stated that had a wife named Agnes who was about fifty, a twenty-five-year-old son Benjamin and a twenty-three-year-old son Dirickson who did not live with him, a twenty-one-year-old son Paynter, twelve-year-old son Woolsey and a ten-year-old daughter Eliza [NARA, S.36000, microfilm M805, Roll 399; M804, Roll 1192, frame 514 of 1046 and https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22756535]. Edward and Agnes were the parents of i. Benjamin, born 11 January 1792, "son of Edward and Agness" [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 110]. ii. Dirickson, born about 1797. iii. Paynter, born about 1800. iv. Woolsey, born about 1808. v. Eliza, born about 1810. 13. John2 Harmon, born say 1727, was taxable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1743 and 1744 [L.P. 1743, 1744] and head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" and one white man over 16 years of age in 1790 [NC:63] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316]. On 30 October 1795 he sold 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle, and hogs in Halifax County to Joseph Lantern, Moses Matthews, and John Kelly [DB 17:920] and sold 100 acres near the road from Halifax Town to Enfield old courthouse to Joseph Lantern on 3 December 1795 [DB 18:130]. (Joseph Lantern was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1776 to 1785.) John may have been the father of i. James, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He may have been identical to Craftshoe Harmon, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806]. ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. iii. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51]. iv. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101]. 14. Emanuel2 Harmon, born say 1733, was sued in Northampton County by John Wilkins, Sr., on 15 May 1754. He was called a "free Negro" on 10 June 1760 when the court ordered him sent to the General Court to be tried for receiving stolen goods from a slave named Will who belonged to the estate of Benjamin Stratton [Orders 1753-8, 100; Minutes 1754-61, 223]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 8 in 1810 [VA:29]. He was the father of i. George2, born say 1755, taxable in Accomack County from 1782 to 1813: taxable on 2 free males, 2 slaves and 5 horses in 1782; 2 free males in 1798; called a "fn" in 1806 and 1812; called "Geo: Harmon (of Emawell)" in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813. His son George was called "of George" in 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 8, 149, 248, 314, 378, 447, 630, 791, 835]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:29]. He served as a soldier in the Revolution. His only heirs Betsy, Comfort, Leah and Sarah Harmon applied for a pension for his service in Accomack County court on 25 September 1832 [Orders 1832-36, 16]. Leah Harmon (over the age of 45) was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820. 15. James Harman, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1783 to 1811: in the list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" from 1801 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 415, 450, 592; 1791-1812, frames 8, 191, 400, 548, 636, 716]. On 4 December 1809 he purchased land on Tanner's Creek which was land he was then living on from the widow of William Holland for $69.38 [DB 45:4]. On 21 August 1821 Kinner Shewcraft sued James Harman (Jr.) and his wife Lucy and a minor named Andrew Shewcraft in Norfolk County court to force the sale of land formerly belonging to Moses Shewcraft. The court ordered the proceeds divided equally among the plaintiff and defendants [Minutes 17:141]. Lucy was apparently identical to Lucy Herman who registered in Norfolk County on 15 December 1828: age 28, 4 11-/34, a bright mulatto, Born free. James and Lucy Harman's descendants were considered Indians in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 489, 1230, 1599, 1600]. i. Jaca, born about 1779, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 57, a mulatto woman, born free, perhaps the mother of Sally Harman who registered on 3 October 1831: 5'2" high, age 20, a Bright Mulatto woman, born free [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 263, 393]. ii. James2, born say, a "F.Blk."/ "free negro" taxable in Princess Anne County from 1807 to 1822 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 365, 438, 486, 502, 546, 701, 682, 701]. His wife Lucy Herman registered in Norfolk County on 15 December 1828: age 28, 4 11-/34, a bright mulatto, Born free. James and Lucy Harman's descendants were considered Indians in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 489, 1230, 1599, 1600]. Other members of the Harmon family were i. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51]. ii. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101]. iii. Southey, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108]. iv. Stephen, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100]. v. Ann, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108]. vi. Scarburgh, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:101]. vii. Molly/ Mary, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:157] and 7 in 1810 [VA:102]. viii. Easter, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:30]. ix. Emanuel3, born about 1789, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: a light Black, 5 feet 7-1/2 Inches...Born free [Free Negro Register, #5].
Additional Notes Other descendants in Delaware were i. Thomas, head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:303]. ii. Abraham, head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:328]. iii. John, born say 1745, required to provide ?20 security in February 1773 for his appearance in Sussex County court [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-94, frame 124]. He left a 6 April 1776 Sussex County will, proved 24 April 1776, in which he left all his estate to his wife Saborah during her widowhood, left a mare and the increase of one young cow to his daughter Saborah and advised that she should leave his daughter Saborah as much as any of her other children. Elizabeth, daughter of Argal Harmon was a witness [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 570-1]. The State indicted Thomas Marvel of Dagsbury Hundred for assaulting Sabra Harmon on 8 October 1789 [DSA, RG 4805.021, 1755-1791, MS case files, 1790 Indictments]. She died before 23 December 1794 when William Rigley and Isaac Morris administered her estate [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 463]. iv.Argel, sued for debt by James Stephenson, Jr., in Sussex County court in November 1762 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1771-93, frame 117], a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, taxable on the south side of Broadkill Hundred in 1770, head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:327], 6 in 1810 [DE:427] and one "free colored" in Dagsboro in 1820 [DE:382]. His daughter Elizabeth was a witness to the 6 April 1776 Sussex County will of John Harmon [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 570-1]. v. Eli2, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:404]. He left a 17 November 1818 Sussex County will which was witnessed by John Rigwah. He left his house to his brother William, left a dollar to his brother Argel, a dollar to each of his sister Milly Mosely's four children, a dollar to his sister Ann's daughter Jane Street, a dollar to his sister Ann's daughter Ephraim Harmon and $30 to his apprentice Cary Hanshaw (Hanser). He also left $10 to the trustees of Harmony Meeting (the Harmony Methodist Episcopal Church) [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frames 519-527]. vi. Ann, named in the will of her brother Eli Harmon, mother of Jane Street and Ephraim Harmon, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:392]. Ephraim was a "Mulatto" who died before 4 August 1840 when administration on his estate was granted John West [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 449]. vii. Henry, charged by the Sussex County court with fornication in November 1777 with Esther Hanzer as witness against him and charged with stealing a mare from Hugh Vestry in August 1791 [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frames 168, 480; Case Files 1791]. viii. Betsey, head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:327]. ix.John, a "free Mulatto" convicted in November 1794 of having two illegitimate female children by a white woman Ann Jones of Broadkill Hundred, one in 1792 and the other in 1794. He was whipped, and ordered to wear a four inch high red Roman T for six months as a mark of dishonor [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-94, frames 561-2]. He was head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342], perhaps the Jonathan Harman who was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458] and 4 "free colored" in Dagsboro in 1820 [DE:376]. He manumitted slaves "old Arter" and Candis (signing) by Sussex County deed on 30 July 1808 [DB AD-27:359]. x. Benjamin1, indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1749/50, apparently for selling liquor without a license as the clerk made a notation in the case about awarding a license to another person. Robert Fraim sued him for debt in February 1750/1 and Benjamin petitioned the court to serve Frame to pay his debt. He was indicted for an unspecified offense in August 1752, and there were continuances for this and possibly other offenses until August 1758 when he pled guilty and was fined 2 shillings [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frames 437, 470, 515, 537, 555, 579, 608; 1753-60, frames 158, 182, 236, 259, 284, 303, 317, 336, 359, 382, 401, 418, 444]. head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:23]. xi. Nathan1, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:424], 9 in 1810 [DE:410] and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. xii. Nathan2, born before 1776, head of a Dagsborough Hundred household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:374]. xiii. Benjamin2, head of a Duck Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:7]. xiv. James, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 "free colored" in Dover in 1820 [DE:34]. xv. William, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:43], 5 in New Castle County in 1810 [DE:303] and 6 "free colored" in Appoquinmink Hundred in 1820 [DE:147]. xvi. Manuel3, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [DE:437]. xvii. Manuel4, head of a Sussex County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [DE:426] and a Dagsborough Hundred household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:374]. xviii. Peter, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:452]. xix. Jethro, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363].
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Family Name Hitchens
Family History Notes 1. Jarret1 Hitchens, born say 1675, received an Accomack County deed of gift from his parents Edward and Elizabeth Hitchens on 19 September 1692 for 170 acres which his father had patented on 9 October 1672 [DW&c, 1682-97, 250]. Jarret made a 13 November 1708 Accomack County will, proved 1 February 1708/9, by which he left his son Major the 170 acres where he was then living, gave daughter Abigail Hitchens a cow, gave daughter Rosanna Hitchens a cow when she reached the age of 16, and gave his son Edward a bed that he had with Edward?s mother Mary when Edward reached the age of 21, and 2 iron pots after his mother Mary?s death [Wills &c 1692-1715, 466a]. He was the father of 2 i. Major1, born say 1686. ii. Abigail, born say 1688. 3 iii. Edward1, born say 1692. iv. Rosanna, born say 1698, perhaps identical to Anne Hutchins who was taxable in the Northampton County household of Major Hitchens in 1733. The Northampton County court presented her for bastard bearing on 8 November 1737. Major Hitchens paid her fine [Orders 1732-42, 284, 291]. 2. Major1 Hitchens, born say 1686, was living in Accomack County on 1 April 1718 when he sold the 170 acres which he received by his father's will for 10,800 pounds of tobacco, noting in the deed that it was land that his father Jarret received by deed of gift from his Major's grandfather Edward Hitchens on 19 September 1692 [DW 1715-29, 41]. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of four tithables in 1733 and 1744 and head of a household of 4 free tithables and 2 slaves, Nan and Sue, from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 232, 237, 262, 274, 280, 312, 325, 330, 362]: Master of family tithable names nubr. Major Hitchens : Tamar, Edward and Anne Hutchins nann & Sue negros 6 On 12 May 1747 the Northampton County court presented him for intermarrying or cohabiting with a "mulatoe" woman and presented Siner Bennett alias Hitchens for cohabiting with Major Hitchens, a "mulatoe man." The King's attorney discontinued the suit against Major on 10 June 1747 and discontinued the suit against Siner on 9 September 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 422, 429, 445, 457]. He died before 20 December 1766 when Tamer Hitchens presented his inventory in Worcester County court. Edward Hitchens and Peter Dolbee were nearest of kin [Prerogative Inventories 91:135-6]. By his 10 November 1765 Worcester County will, proved 18 June 1766, he left his wife Tamer the use of his land which was then to descend to his son Edmond(?), and named sons Edward, Major, Edmond and Jard [Jones, Worcester County Wills, JW-3, 1759-1769, 36]. He was the father of i. James, born say 1722, tithable in Major's household in 1738 and 1743. ii. Major 2, Jr., born say 1724, tithable in Major's household in 1740 and 1741 and in Edward Hitchen's household in 1743. He was listed in the Muster Roll of Recruits to the Delaware Regiment at the Port of Christiana Bridge on 20 June 1781 with Caleb Hitchens, Peter Beckett, Levin Magee, Presley/ Preston Hutt, George Lehea (a slave) and David Hanser in an undated list of the 1st Delaware Company. Major and Caleb were paid for their services [NARA, M246, roll 30, frame 283 of 532, roll 31, frame 495 of 658; Delaware Archives, I:135]. iii. Jared2, born say 1726, tithable in Major's household in 1743 and 1744. He was called Garret Hitchens, a "mulato," on 12 May 1747 when the court presented Mary Filby for intermarrying and cohabiting with him. The case was dismissed by the King's attorney on 12 August 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 429, 444]. He was taxable in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777. iv. Edmund. 3. Edward1 Hitchens, born say 1692, was tithable in Major Hitchens's Northampton County household in 1737. He married a white woman named Tamer Smith before 10 October 1738 when the sheriff was ordered to take her into custody, keep her in the county jail for six months without bail, and to discharge her after she paid a fine of ?10 as punishment for marrying Edward Hitchens, a "Mulatto man" [Orders 1732-42, 334; Deal, Race and Class, 216]. On 1 January 1773 he sold for ?90 (signing) 200 acres of a 215 acre tract called "Hitchens Choice" in Worcester County near Indian River which was land he received by patent of 22 August 1762 and on the same day sold another 50 acres of Hitchens Choice for ?15 [DB I:209-11]. He was taxable in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, in 1777 and also listed that year in Baltimore Hundred. He was probably the father of i. Edward2, Jr., taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777, listed in Captain William Peery's muster raised to guard the Town of Lewes and the coast of the Delaware Bay, enlisted on 6 May 1777 [NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 322 of 653]. ii. Isaac, taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777. And they were likely the ancestors of i. Milly, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:388]. ii. Eli, born 1776-1794, married Hester Jackson on 9 September 1802 in Sussex County, and was head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:378].
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State Virginia
County (Primary) Accomack
Other Counties Northampton, Sussex
Family Name Hitchens
Family History Notes 1. Jarret1 Hitchens, born say 1675, received an Accomack County deed of gift from his parents Edward and Elizabeth Hitchens on 19 September 1692 for 170 acres which his father had patented on 9 October 1672 [DW&c, 1682-97, 250]. Jarret made a 13 November 1708 Accomack County will, proved 1 February 1708/9, by which he left his son Major the 170 acres where he was then living, gave daughter Abigail Hitchens a cow, gave daughter Rosanna Hitchens a cow when she reached the age of 16, and gave his son Edward a bed that he had with Edward?s mother Mary when Edward reached the age of 21, and 2 iron pots after his mother Mary?s death [Wills &c 1692-1715, 466a]. He was the father of 2 i. Major1, born say 1686. ii. Abigail, born say 1688. 3 iii. Edward1, born say 1692. iv. Rosanna, born say 1698, perhaps identical to Anne Hutchins who was taxable in the Northampton County household of Major Hitchens in 1733. The Northampton County court presented her for bastard bearing on 8 November 1737. Major Hitchens paid her fine [Orders 1732-42, 284, 291]. 2. Major1 Hitchens, born say 1686, was living in Accomack County on 1 April 1718 when he sold the 170 acres which he received by his father's will for 10,800 pounds of tobacco, noting in the deed that it was land that his father Jarret received by deed of gift from his Major's grandfather Edward Hitchens on 19 September 1692 [DW 1715-29, 41]. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of four tithables in 1733 and 1744 and head of a household of 4 free tithables and 2 slaves, Nan and Sue, from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 232, 237, 262, 274, 280, 312, 325, 330, 362]: Master of family tithable names nubr. Major Hitchens : Tamar, Edward and Anne Hutchins nann & Sue negros 6 On 12 May 1747 the Northampton County court presented him for intermarrying or cohabiting with a "mulatoe" woman and presented Siner Bennett alias Hitchens for cohabiting with Major Hitchens, a "mulatoe man." The King's attorney discontinued the suit against Major on 10 June 1747 and discontinued the suit against Siner on 9 September 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 422, 429, 445, 457]. He died before 20 December 1766 when Tamer Hitchens presented his inventory in Worcester County court. Edward Hitchens and Peter Dolbee were nearest of kin [Prerogative Inventories 91:135-6]. By his 10 November 1765 Worcester County will, proved 18 June 1766, he left his wife Tamer the use of his land which was then to descend to his son Edmond(?), and named sons Edward, Major, Edmond and Jard [Jones, Worcester County Wills, JW-3, 1759-1769, 36]. He was the father of i. James, born say 1722, tithable in Major's household in 1738 and 1743. ii. Major 2, Jr., born say 1724, tithable in Major's household in 1740 and 1741 and in Edward Hitchen's household in 1743. He was listed in the Muster Roll of Recruits to the Delaware Regiment at the Port of Christiana Bridge on 20 June 1781 with Caleb Hitchens, Peter Beckett, Levin Magee, Presley/ Preston Hutt, George Lehea (a slave) and David Hanser in an undated list of the 1st Delaware Company. Major and Caleb were paid for their services [NARA, M246, roll 30, frame 283 of 532, roll 31, frame 495 of 658; Delaware Archives, I:135]. iii. Jared2, born say 1726, tithable in Major's household in 1743 and 1744. He was called Garret Hitchens, a "mulato," on 12 May 1747 when the court presented Mary Filby for intermarrying and cohabiting with him. The case was dismissed by the King's attorney on 12 August 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 429, 444]. He was taxable in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777. iv. Edmund. 3. Edward1 Hitchens, born say 1692, was tithable in Major Hitchens's Northampton County household in 1737. He married a white woman named Tamer Smith before 10 October 1738 when the sheriff was ordered to take her into custody, keep her in the county jail for six months without bail, and to discharge her after she paid a fine of ?10 as punishment for marrying Edward Hitchens, a "Mulatto man" [Orders 1732-42, 334; Deal, Race and Class, 216]. On 1 January 1773 he sold for ?90 (signing) 200 acres of a 215 acre tract called "Hitchens Choice" in Worcester County near Indian River which was land he received by patent of 22 August 1762 and on the same day sold another 50 acres of Hitchens Choice for ?15 [DB I:209-11]. He was taxable in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, in 1777 and also listed that year in Baltimore Hundred. He was probably the father of i. Edward2, Jr., taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777, listed in Captain William Peery's muster raised to guard the Town of Lewes and the coast of the Delaware Bay, enlisted on 6 May 1777 [NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 322 of 653]. ii. Isaac, taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777. And they were likely the ancestors of i. Milly, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:388]. ii. Eli, born 1776-1794, married Hester Jackson on 9 September 1802 in Sussex County, and was head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:378].
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Family Name Hodgskin
Family History Notes 1. Jonas Hodgskin, born say 1720, a "Mallatto," confessed on 19 August 1739 in Somerset County court that he was the father of an illegitimate child by Dorcas Malavery. He was fined 30 shillings [Judicial Record 1738-40, 171]. He was taxable in Pocomoke Hundred of Somerset County in the household of Sue Hogskin (his white mother? who was not a taxable) in 1736, in Henry Schofield's household in 1737, in Seward Tomlinson's in 1738, in Solomon Tomlinson's in 1739, with slaves Robin and Sarah in Annamessex Hundred in 1740, and taxable in his own Pocomoke household from 1746 to 1759 [List of Tithables 1736-1759]. He married Rodey Driges (Driggers) on 23 December 1747 at Coventry P.E. Church, Somerset County, Maryland [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 2:104]. Rhoda was taxable in his Pocomoke Hundred household from 1756 to 1759. He was granted 50 acres in Worcester County on 12 March 1764 called Flemings Pleasure on the east side of Dividing Creek, and he and his wife Rhoda sold this land (making their marks) on 15 June 1770. On 5 August 1769 he mortgaged to William Lane a crop of corn on the plantation whereon Lane's wife was then living and ten hogs on 5 August 1769 [DB H:79-80, 339]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777 and a delinquent taxpayer in 1787 [Sussex County Levy Lists, n.p.]. His wife Rhoda Hodgskin was called the sister of Drake Driggers in the administration of Driggers' 2 September 1788 Sussex County estate. They were the parents of i. John, born 10 February 1747/8, "son of Jonas and Rodey Hodgskin" [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 104]. ii. Devericks/ Debrix, born 4 February 1748/9, "son of Jonas and Rodey Hodgskin," [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 2:104], a taxable in Little Creek in 1788, 1790, 1791, and 1795 [Sussex County Levy Lists] and head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:375]. iii. ?Stephen, born say 1770, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek, Sussex County in 1787 and a taxable in Little Creek in 1788 and 1790 [Sussex County Levy Lists]. The Sussex County court charged him with assault in February 1786 [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 383, 386, 388, 403]. iv. ?David, born say 1772, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek in 1787. v. ?Winder, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391]. Endnotes: 1. Dorcas Malavery called him Jonas Miller when she named him as father of her child, but he was called Jonas Hogskin when he confessed. A James Hogskin alias Miller married Mary Hobbs in Somerset County on 25 July 1815.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Hodgskin
Family History Notes 1. Jonas Hodgskin, born say 1720, a "Mallatto," confessed on 19 August 1739 in Somerset County court that he was the father of an illegitimate child by Dorcas Malavery. He was fined 30 shillings [Judicial Record 1738-40, 171]. He was taxable in Pocomoke Hundred of Somerset County in the household of Sue Hogskin (his white mother? who was not a taxable) in 1736, in Henry Schofield's household in 1737, in Seward Tomlinson's in 1738, in Solomon Tomlinson's in 1739, with slaves Robin and Sarah in Annamessex Hundred in 1740, and taxable in his own Pocomoke household from 1746 to 1759 [List of Tithables 1736-1759]. He married Rodey Driges (Driggers) on 23 December 1747 at Coventry P.E. Church, Somerset County, Maryland [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 2:104]. Rhoda was taxable in his Pocomoke Hundred household from 1756 to 1759. He was granted 50 acres in Worcester County on 12 March 1764 called Flemings Pleasure on the east side of Dividing Creek, and he and his wife Rhoda sold this land (making their marks) on 15 June 1770. On 5 August 1769 he mortgaged to William Lane a crop of corn on the plantation whereon Lane's wife was then living and ten hogs on 5 August 1769 [DB H:79-80, 339]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777 and a delinquent taxpayer in 1787 [Sussex County Levy Lists, n.p.]. His wife Rhoda Hodgskin was called the sister of Drake Driggers in the administration of Driggers' 2 September 1788 Sussex County estate. They were the parents of i. John, born 10 February 1747/8, "son of Jonas and Rodey Hodgskin" [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 104]. ii. Devericks/ Debrix, born 4 February 1748/9, "son of Jonas and Rodey Hodgskin," [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 2:104], a taxable in Little Creek in 1788, 1790, 1791, and 1795 [Sussex County Levy Lists] and head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:375]. iii. ?Stephen, born say 1770, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek, Sussex County in 1787 and a taxable in Little Creek in 1788 and 1790 [Sussex County Levy Lists]. The Sussex County court charged him with assault in February 1786 [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 383, 386, 388, 403]. iv. ?David, born say 1772, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek in 1787. v. ?Winder, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391]. Endnotes: 1. Dorcas Malavery called him Jonas Miller when she named him as father of her child, but he was called Jonas Hogskin when he confessed. A James Hogskin alias Miller married Mary Hobbs in Somerset County on 25 July 1815.
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Family Name Horner
Family History Notes 1. George1 Horner, born say 1690, was the common-law wife of Matilda, a "free mulatto woman," in Somerset County, Maryland. She was the servant of Captain Arnold Elzey of Monacan Hundred on 10 March 1707/8, 8 November 1710, and 7 March 1710/11 when she was presented by the Somerset County court for having an illegitimate child. She identified George Horner as the father in each case. The court ordered her to serve her master additional time for the trouble of his house and fined George 600 pounds of tobacco for each offense. She was called "Martilldo ... a certain Mollato Woman servant to Capt. Arnold Elzey" when she petitioned the Somerset County court on 26 November 1713 stating that she was about twenty-two to twenty-three years old and should have been free at age sixteen. The court ruled that she serve six years for fines, court costs, and the trouble of her master's house (for having children). They had another child before 12 November 1714 for which Martildo was ordered to receive ten lashes and serve another six months [Judicial Record 1707-11, 69, 100-1, 431, 451, 453; 1711-13, 299-300; 1713-15, 12, 127-8, 176; 1715-17, 57]. George was living on land belonging to John Bozman on 26 April 1716 when Bozman made his Somerset County will. He was taxable in Manokin Hundred from 1723 to 1740: taxable on William Horner in 1725, on Martilder and William in 1727, on Martilder, William and George Horner in 1728. He was called George Horner, Sr., in 1739 when he was head of a household with Mertildo and John and Arnold in Manokin Hundred. He died before 14 April 1744 when the inventory of his Somerset County estate was valued at over ?112. The June 1745 account of the estate divided the proceeds among his wife Matilda, adult children: Arnold, Elizabeth, and Charles and his underage children: Samuel, Robert, and Mary [Land Records Liber AC-25:12; Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, 4:88; Maryland Inventories, Liber 29:207; Maryland Accounts, Liber 21:413; Davidson, Free Blacks on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland, 52]. Matilda was head of an Annamessex Hundred household with Samuel and Robert Horner in 1749. George and Matilda's children were i. ?George2, Jr., born say 1710, taxable head of his own household in Somerset County in 1733, not mentioned in the distribution of George Horner's estate in 1744. The Somerset County court indicted him for stealing 30 pounds of tobacco from William McClemmey on 1 August 1740, and in November 1749 the court convicted him of stealing a calf which belonged to George Irven and ordered him to pay four times the value [Judicial Record 1740-2, 36; 1749-51, 15]. ii. Arnold1, born say 1712, taxable in Manokin Hundred in 1739. He was living on "Manlowe's Lot" in 1748 when he was sued in Somerset County court for four years back rent [Judicial Records 1747-49, 161, 232]. In March 1749/50 David Wilson sued him for ?4 due by promissory note [Judicial Records 1747-49, 161, 232; 1749-51, 59, 156]. iii. Elizabeth1, born say 1716. iv. Charles, born say 1722, taxable in John Rigsby's Somerset County household in 1748. v. Samuel, born say 1728, underage in 1744, taxable in his mother's household in 1749. vi. Robert, born say 1730, underage in 1744, taxable in Somerset County in 1749. vii. Mary, born say 1732, underage in 1744. Their descendants were i. William, born say 1720, a planter who was convicted by the Somerset County court in 1742 of stealing hogs worth 500 pounds of tobacco and given 15 lashes [Judicial Record 1742-4, 87]. ii. Arnold2, Jr., charged in Somerset County court on 16 June 1767 with assaulting William Luke. he was called Arnold Horner, Jr., planter on 20 August 1771 when he admitted owing John Bell ?10.15 [Judicial Record 1766-7, 160; 1769-72, 208]. iii. Elizabeth2, confessed to the Somerset County court on 5 August 1766 that she had a child by James Shingwich and confessed to a child by James Ring on 17 March 1767. She was acquitted of stealing petticoats from Mary Caldwell in March 1769 but convicted of stealing articles worth 992 pounds of tobacco in June 1769. The court ordered that she stand in the pillory for thirty minutes, receive thirty-nine lashes and be sold for fourfold the value of the articles [Judicial Record 1766-7, 14a, 106; 1767-9, 257; 1769-72, 50]. She was sentenced to death by hanging but pardoned by the Governor on condition she leave Maryland [Archives of Maryland 32:315].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Horner
Family History Notes 1. George1 Horner, born say 1690, was the common-law wife of Matilda, a "free mulatto woman," in Somerset County, Maryland. She was the servant of Captain Arnold Elzey of Monacan Hundred on 10 March 1707/8, 8 November 1710, and 7 March 1710/11 when she was presented by the Somerset County court for having an illegitimate child. She identified George Horner as the father in each case. The court ordered her to serve her master additional time for the trouble of his house and fined George 600 pounds of tobacco for each offense. She was called "Martilldo ... a certain Mollato Woman servant to Capt. Arnold Elzey" when she petitioned the Somerset County court on 26 November 1713 stating that she was about twenty-two to twenty-three years old and should have been free at age sixteen. The court ruled that she serve six years for fines, court costs, and the trouble of her master's house (for having children). They had another child before 12 November 1714 for which Martildo was ordered to receive ten lashes and serve another six months [Judicial Record 1707-11, 69, 100-1, 431, 451, 453; 1711-13, 299-300; 1713-15, 12, 127-8, 176; 1715-17, 57]. George was living on land belonging to John Bozman on 26 April 1716 when Bozman made his Somerset County will. He was taxable in Manokin Hundred from 1723 to 1740: taxable on William Horner in 1725, on Martilder and William in 1727, on Martilder, William and George Horner in 1728. He was called George Horner, Sr., in 1739 when he was head of a household with Mertildo and John and Arnold in Manokin Hundred. He died before 14 April 1744 when the inventory of his Somerset County estate was valued at over ?112. The June 1745 account of the estate divided the proceeds among his wife Matilda, adult children: Arnold, Elizabeth, and Charles and his underage children: Samuel, Robert, and Mary [Land Records Liber AC-25:12; Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, 4:88; Maryland Inventories, Liber 29:207; Maryland Accounts, Liber 21:413; Davidson, Free Blacks on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland, 52]. Matilda was head of an Annamessex Hundred household with Samuel and Robert Horner in 1749. George and Matilda's children were i. ?George2, Jr., born say 1710, taxable head of his own household in Somerset County in 1733, not mentioned in the distribution of George Horner's estate in 1744. The Somerset County court indicted him for stealing 30 pounds of tobacco from William McClemmey on 1 August 1740, and in November 1749 the court convicted him of stealing a calf which belonged to George Irven and ordered him to pay four times the value [Judicial Record 1740-2, 36; 1749-51, 15]. ii. Arnold1, born say 1712, taxable in Manokin Hundred in 1739. He was living on "Manlowe's Lot" in 1748 when he was sued in Somerset County court for four years back rent [Judicial Records 1747-49, 161, 232]. In March 1749/50 David Wilson sued him for ?4 due by promissory note [Judicial Records 1747-49, 161, 232; 1749-51, 59, 156]. iii. Elizabeth1, born say 1716. iv. Charles, born say 1722, taxable in John Rigsby's Somerset County household in 1748. v. Samuel, born say 1728, underage in 1744, taxable in his mother's household in 1749. vi. Robert, born say 1730, underage in 1744, taxable in Somerset County in 1749. vii. Mary, born say 1732, underage in 1744. Their descendants were i. William, born say 1720, a planter who was convicted by the Somerset County court in 1742 of stealing hogs worth 500 pounds of tobacco and given 15 lashes [Judicial Record 1742-4, 87]. ii. Arnold2, Jr., charged in Somerset County court on 16 June 1767 with assaulting William Luke. he was called Arnold Horner, Jr., planter on 20 August 1771 when he admitted owing John Bell ?10.15 [Judicial Record 1766-7, 160; 1769-72, 208]. iii. Elizabeth2, confessed to the Somerset County court on 5 August 1766 that she had a child by James Shingwich and confessed to a child by James Ring on 17 March 1767. She was acquitted of stealing petticoats from Mary Caldwell in March 1769 but convicted of stealing articles worth 992 pounds of tobacco in June 1769. The court ordered that she stand in the pillory for thirty minutes, receive thirty-nine lashes and be sold for fourfold the value of the articles [Judicial Record 1766-7, 14a, 106; 1767-9, 257; 1769-72, 50]. She was sentenced to death by hanging but pardoned by the Governor on condition she leave Maryland [Archives of Maryland 32:315].
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Family Name Houston
Family History Notes 1. Fortune Magee, born say 1687, was a servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County who was married to George Magee at the time. On 7 March 1710/11 the court presented her for having four illegitimate children: one about seven years old, one five, one three and one three months old. On 8 August 1711 she confessed that Penny, "negroe" servant to Mr. Benjamin Wailer, was the father of her child. On 6 August 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 134; 1702-5, 251; 1707-11, 454; 1711-13, 40, 220]. Fortune was taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, in 1735 [List of Tithables]. Her children were i. Ross/ Rose, born in March 1703. 2 ii. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705. iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in August 1712 when she was bound apprentice. 2. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when her "mulatto" children, Belinder, Davey, Jenney, James, and Nelly Magee were born. She was the mother of 3 i. Belinder, born say 1747. ii. David. iii. James. iv. Nelly. 3. Belinder Magee/ Houston, born say 1737, was called a "Mollatto woman" Bellinder McGhee on 19 May 1768 when she was listed in the inventory of the Worcester County estate of John Houston with five weeks remaining to serve [Prerogative Inventories 95:312]. She may have taken the name of her master John Houston and been identical to Bellinder Houston, a "Negro" head of a Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, living near Susannah Magee [DE:391]. She was probably the mother of i. Lydia Houston, born say 1755, married Nathan Norwood on 22 March 1775 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 288]. ii. Susannah Magee, born say 1764, called "Sue a Molatto" girl with twenty-seven years to serve when she was listed in Worcester County inventory of the estate of John Houston on 19 May 1768 [Prerogative Inventories 95:312], called Susannah Magee, a "Negro" head of a Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391]. iii. David Houston, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:324] and 2 "free colored" in Dagsboro Hundred in 1820 [DE:374]. iv. Jacob Houston, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:367].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Houston
Family History Notes 1. Fortune Magee, born say 1687, was a servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County who was married to George Magee at the time. On 7 March 1710/11 the court presented her for having four illegitimate children: one about seven years old, one five, one three and one three months old. On 8 August 1711 she confessed that Penny, "negroe" servant to Mr. Benjamin Wailer, was the father of her child. On 6 August 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 134; 1702-5, 251; 1707-11, 454; 1711-13, 40, 220]. Fortune was taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, in 1735 [List of Tithables]. Her children were i. Ross/ Rose, born in March 1703. 2 ii. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705. iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in August 1712 when she was bound apprentice. 2. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when her "mulatto" children, Belinder, Davey, Jenney, James, and Nelly Magee were born. She was the mother of 3 i. Belinder, born say 1747. ii. David. iii. James. iv. Nelly. 3. Belinder Magee/ Houston, born say 1737, was called a "Mollatto woman" Bellinder McGhee on 19 May 1768 when she was listed in the inventory of the Worcester County estate of John Houston with five weeks remaining to serve [Prerogative Inventories 95:312]. She may have taken the name of her master John Houston and been identical to Bellinder Houston, a "Negro" head of a Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, living near Susannah Magee [DE:391]. She was probably the mother of i. Lydia Houston, born say 1755, married Nathan Norwood on 22 March 1775 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 288]. ii. Susannah Magee, born say 1764, called "Sue a Molatto" girl with twenty-seven years to serve when she was listed in Worcester County inventory of the estate of John Houston on 19 May 1768 [Prerogative Inventories 95:312], called Susannah Magee, a "Negro" head of a Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391]. iii. David Houston, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:324] and 2 "free colored" in Dagsboro Hundred in 1820 [DE:374]. iv. Jacob Houston, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:367].
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Family Name Jackson
Family History Notes 1. Henry Jackson, born say 1669, was called "Harry a Maletto," the servant of William Sterling, in March 1689/90 when Francis Betteley deposed to the Northampton County, Virginia court that he had been harrowing wheat in company with Harry when Harry told him where Mr. John Baron stored cloth and other goods (which Betteley later stole). Harry was called Henry Jackson, "maletto servant to William Sterling," on 29 September 1690 when he sued for his freedom. The case was resolved by the parties agreeing that Henry would serve one year and then be discharged from service with reasonable clothing. On 28 May 1697 he, called "the maletto," was presented for driving a cart on Sunday. He was discharged from the presentment on payment of the court fees [Wills, Orders, 1689-98, 46, 62, 64-5; 1698-1710, 427, 451]. He had a child by Ann Shepherd, a "Christian white woman" who was presented by the Accomack County, Virginia Court for having an illegitimate child. When required to identify the father of her child on 6 June 1721, she told the Accomack County court that it was "Indian Edmund," but on 6 July 1721 she admitted that it was Henry Jackson, "a Mullatto." The court ordered that she be sold for five years [Orders 1719-24, 33]. Henry and Ann may have been the parents of 2 i. John, born say 1720. 2. John Jackson, born say 1720, may have been the John Jaxon who was taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred of Somerset County in the household adjoining Edward Harman in 1739 [List of Tithables, 1739]. He had a child by Jane Harman in Somerset County before 18 November 1740 when she confessed that he was the father [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310]. He was a "mulatto" who baptized his son William on 15 June 1746 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 91]. His children were 3 i. William, born say 1740. ii. Patience, born 25 9ber 1748 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. She married Job Friend ("Melattoes") on 8 June 1772 in Sussex County [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284]. iii. ?James, called a "Poore Muloto & Several in his family" when he was a delinquent taxable in Indian River in 1789, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 3 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred in 1820 [DE:208]. iv. ?Stephen, servant of John Regua/ Ridgeway in March 1754 when the Sussex County court ordered him to serve additional time to make up for thirty day's lost service worth 52 shillings [Delaware Archives RG4815.017, 1753-1760, frame 93]. He was taxable in Indian River from 1773 to 1784, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:320] and 5 "free colored" in Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:388]. 4 v. ?Annanias, born say 1760. 3. William Jackson, born say 1746, son of John Jackson, was baptized on 15 June 1746 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River. He, a "mulattoe," and his wife Nelly registered the 19 October 1768 birth of their daughter, Lydia, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 91, 98]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1773 and 1774, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458] and head of a Nanticoke Hundred household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:232]. Their children were i. Lydia, born 19 October 1768, baptized 20 August 1769. ii. ?Agnes, born say 1770, married Edward Hermon (Harmon) on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware. iii. ?Israel, married Polly Handsor, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302, 318]. 4. Annanias Jackson, born say 1760, and his wife, Hester, registered the 10 March 1785 birth of their daughter, Hester, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. They were the parents of i. Hester, born 10 March 1785, married Eli Hitchins on 9 September 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. Eli was head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:378]. ii. Katherine, married Thomas Hanzor on 4 February 1808 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties Northampton, Accomack
Family Name Jackson
Family History Notes 1. Henry Jackson, born say 1669, was called "Harry a Maletto," the servant of William Sterling, in March 1689/90 when Francis Betteley deposed to the Northampton County, Virginia court that he had been harrowing wheat in company with Harry when Harry told him where Mr. John Baron stored cloth and other goods (which Betteley later stole). Harry was called Henry Jackson, "maletto servant to William Sterling," on 29 September 1690 when he sued for his freedom. The case was resolved by the parties agreeing that Henry would serve one year and then be discharged from service with reasonable clothing. On 28 May 1697 he, called "the maletto," was presented for driving a cart on Sunday. He was discharged from the presentment on payment of the court fees [Wills, Orders, 1689-98, 46, 62, 64-5; 1698-1710, 427, 451]. He had a child by Ann Shepherd, a "Christian white woman" who was presented by the Accomack County, Virginia Court for having an illegitimate child. When required to identify the father of her child on 6 June 1721, she told the Accomack County court that it was "Indian Edmund," but on 6 July 1721 she admitted that it was Henry Jackson, "a Mullatto." The court ordered that she be sold for five years [Orders 1719-24, 33]. Henry and Ann may have been the parents of 2 i. John, born say 1720. 2. John Jackson, born say 1720, may have been the John Jaxon who was taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred of Somerset County in the household adjoining Edward Harman in 1739 [List of Tithables, 1739]. He had a child by Jane Harman in Somerset County before 18 November 1740 when she confessed that he was the father [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310]. He was a "mulatto" who baptized his son William on 15 June 1746 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 91]. His children were 3 i. William, born say 1740. ii. Patience, born 25 9ber 1748 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. She married Job Friend ("Melattoes") on 8 June 1772 in Sussex County [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284]. iii. ?James, called a "Poore Muloto & Several in his family" when he was a delinquent taxable in Indian River in 1789, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 3 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred in 1820 [DE:208]. iv. ?Stephen, servant of John Regua/ Ridgeway in March 1754 when the Sussex County court ordered him to serve additional time to make up for thirty day's lost service worth 52 shillings [Delaware Archives RG4815.017, 1753-1760, frame 93]. He was taxable in Indian River from 1773 to 1784, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:320] and 5 "free colored" in Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:388]. 4 v. ?Annanias, born say 1760. 3. William Jackson, born say 1746, son of John Jackson, was baptized on 15 June 1746 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River. He, a "mulattoe," and his wife Nelly registered the 19 October 1768 birth of their daughter, Lydia, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 91, 98]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1773 and 1774, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458] and head of a Nanticoke Hundred household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:232]. Their children were i. Lydia, born 19 October 1768, baptized 20 August 1769. ii. ?Agnes, born say 1770, married Edward Hermon (Harmon) on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware. iii. ?Israel, married Polly Handsor, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302, 318]. 4. Annanias Jackson, born say 1760, and his wife, Hester, registered the 10 March 1785 birth of their daughter, Hester, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. They were the parents of i. Hester, born 10 March 1785, married Eli Hitchins on 9 September 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. Eli was head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:378]. ii. Katherine, married Thomas Hanzor on 4 February 1808 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320].
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Family Name Jacobs
Family History Notes 1. Abel1 Jacobs, born say 1745, a "mulatto," was living in Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware, when he and his wife, Sarah, registered the 10 July 1769 birth of their son, Abraham, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 98]. Abel was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1777 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 1]. His children were i. Abraham, born 10 July 1769, baptized 20 August 1769, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. ii. Sarah, married Adonijah Harmon, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware. iii. Abel2, married Nancy Morris, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310, 318].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties
Family Name Jacobs
Family History Notes 1. Abel1 Jacobs, born say 1745, a "mulatto," was living in Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware, when he and his wife, Sarah, registered the 10 July 1769 birth of their son, Abraham, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 98]. Abel was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1777 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 1]. His children were i. Abraham, born 10 July 1769, baptized 20 August 1769, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. ii. Sarah, married Adonijah Harmon, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware. iii. Abel2, married Nancy Morris, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310, 318].
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Family Name Jervis
Family History Notes 1. Margrett Jervice, born say 1697, was living in Monokin Hundred of Somerset County on 2 June 1714 when she confessed in court that Captain Arnold Elzey's "Negroe servant" was the father of her "Mallato" child. The court sold her for seven years and her child Money for thirty-one years to Mr. Worthington for 3,000 pounds of tobacco. Casah "Negroe man servant" of Major Arnold Elzey confessed that he was the father and received 30 lashes. She was the spinster servant of Mrs. Alice Worthington of Stepney Parish on 4 June 1717 when she confessed that she had an illegitimate child by "Buboe Negroe." The court ordered her sold for seven years, sold her child to her mistress until the age of thirty one for 500 pounds of tobacco, and ordered that Buboe receive 30 lashes. The court sold Margaret to Merrick Ellis, Gentleman, for 1,000 pounds of tobacco on 18 August 1724 [Judicial Record 1713-5, 70-1; 1715-7, 211, 235, 239-40; 1723-5, 217]. She was the ancestor of i. Money, born about March 1714, apparently identical to "Mollatto" Moll Jervice whose six-month-old son Sam was sold by the Somerset County court to Alice Ellis for 31 years in August 1733 for 500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Record 1733-5, 56]. ii. Ann Jervis, born say 1716, a spinster living in Stepney Parish on 15 June 1736 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by a "negroe" on 10 March 1735. The court sold her for seven years and her son until the age of thirty-one to Alice Ellis [Judicial Record 1735-8, 198]. iii. Friday, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:866].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Jervis
Family History Notes 1. Margrett Jervice, born say 1697, was living in Monokin Hundred of Somerset County on 2 June 1714 when she confessed in court that Captain Arnold Elzey's "Negroe servant" was the father of her "Mallato" child. The court sold her for seven years and her child Money for thirty-one years to Mr. Worthington for 3,000 pounds of tobacco. Casah "Negroe man servant" of Major Arnold Elzey confessed that he was the father and received 30 lashes. She was the spinster servant of Mrs. Alice Worthington of Stepney Parish on 4 June 1717 when she confessed that she had an illegitimate child by "Buboe Negroe." The court ordered her sold for seven years, sold her child to her mistress until the age of thirty one for 500 pounds of tobacco, and ordered that Buboe receive 30 lashes. The court sold Margaret to Merrick Ellis, Gentleman, for 1,000 pounds of tobacco on 18 August 1724 [Judicial Record 1713-5, 70-1; 1715-7, 211, 235, 239-40; 1723-5, 217]. She was the ancestor of i. Money, born about March 1714, apparently identical to "Mollatto" Moll Jervice whose six-month-old son Sam was sold by the Somerset County court to Alice Ellis for 31 years in August 1733 for 500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Record 1733-5, 56]. ii. Ann Jervis, born say 1716, a spinster living in Stepney Parish on 15 June 1736 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by a "negroe" on 10 March 1735. The court sold her for seven years and her son until the age of thirty-one to Alice Ellis [Judicial Record 1735-8, 198]. iii. Friday, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:866].
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Family Name Johnson
Family History Notes The Johnson family originated in Northampton County, Virginia, before 1650. Members of the family were in Somerset County, Maryland, by 1665, in Delaware by 1677, and in North Carolina by 1720. Included below are the members of the family who moved to Maryland and Delaware during the colonial period. For the complete family history, see the Johnson History in the Virginia section. 1. Anthony1 Johnson "Negro," probably born about 1600, was free before 10 January 1647 when he purchased a calf from James Berry by deed proved in Northampton County, Virginia [ODW 1651-54, 123]. He patented 250 acres in Northampton County at "great Naswattock Creek" for the transportation of five persons including his son, Richard Johnson, on 24 July 1651 [Patents 1643-51, 326]. His wife, Mary, and their two daughters were excused from paying taxes by the Northampton County, Virginia Court on 28 February 1652 [ODW 1651-54, fol.161]. In 1665 he and his wife Mary, his son John, and his wife Susanna, and their slave John Casor moved to Somerset County, Maryland with Randall Revell and Ann Toft, who claimed them and many whites as head rights for 2,350 acres of land [Patents 8:495-6]. Anthony and his wife sold 250 acres of their own land, left 50 acres to their son, Richard, and took fourteen head of cattle, a mare, and eighteen sheep with them [Accomack DW 1664-71, fol.10; p.12-fol.12]. On 10 September 1666 he leased 300 acres in Somerset County on the south side of Wicomico Creek in Wicomico Hundred, called "Tonies Vinyard," for two hundred years [Land Records O-1:32-33]. He apparently died before August 1670 when "a jury of white men" in Accomack County decided that his land should be escheated since "he was a Negroe and by consequence an alien" [Virginia Genealogist 2:20, 109-113]. His lease in Somerset County, Maryland, was renegotiated by his widow, Mary, for ninety-nine years with the provision that her sons, John and Richard, would assume the lease after her death [Land Records O-2, 20-21]. Her slave, John Casor, recorded his livestock brand in court with her consent on 3 September 1672, and she recorded her mark a few weeks later on Mary recorded her livestock mark on 26 September 1672 [Archives of Maryland 54:760-1]. He was called "John Cazara Negro" when he was a witness (signing) to a power of attorney by which she assigned her son, John, authority over her property and authority to sue for some debts in Virginia, and he was also witness on 3 September 1672 to her deed of gift to her grandchildren. She called herself "Mary Johnson ... Negro (the relict of Anthony Johnson ... Negro deceased)" in the deed by which she gave cattle to her three grandchildren, Anthony, Richard, and Francis [Somerset County Judicial Record 1671-75, 159-62]. She was called "Mary Johnson of Wiccocomoco ... widow" in July 1676 when she purchased a mare and assigned it to John Corsala (her slave) [Somerset County Judicial Record 1675-7, 95]. She was called executor of Anthony Johnson deceased on 17 January 1690 when Edward Revell acted as her attorney in a suit she brought in Accomack County court [WDO 1678-82, 154]. She was living in Sussex County, Delaware, in March 1693/4 when Mary Okey appeared in court to support her complaint that her son, John, was not maintaining her as he had promised [Court Records 1680-99, 646, 655]. The children of Anthony and Mary Johnson were 2 i. John1, say 1631. 3 ii. Richard1, born about 1632. iii. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the Northampton County court in February 1652, perhaps the Joan1 Johnson who in 1657 received 100 acres in Northampton County from "Deabendanba, Kinge of nusangs," being land next to her brother, John [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671]. iv. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the Northampton County court in February 1652. 2. John1 Johnson, born say 1631, received a grant for 550 acres in Northampton County on 10 May 1652 "at great Naswattock Cr. adjacent to 200 acres granted Anthony Johnson" for the importation of 11 persons including Mary Johnson [Patents 3:101]. He received this patent after suing a white resident of the county, also named John Johnson, who tried to illegally take possession of the land. In 1660 he was head of a household of two tithables in Northampton County, called John Johnson Negro [DW 1657-66, 57-58, 103; DW 1651-54, fol.200]. He and his wife, Susanna, sold their land in 1664 [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671]. In November 1654 he and Mary Gersheene, an African American servant of his father were punished for fornication [ODW 1654-55, fol.35, ODW 1651-54 p.226-fol.226]. On 17 January 1664/5 his wife, Susannah, petitioned the Northampton County court to release him from jail where he was held for begetting a child by Hannah Leach who was probably white [Orders 1664-74, fol.92]. In 1665 he moved to Somerset County, Maryland, with his parents. He was called "John Johnson Negro" on 11 March 1667/8 when he and two white men, Alexander King and John Richards, were charged in Somerset County court with stealing corn from an Indian named Katackcuweiticks. They confessed their guilt and were ordered to deliver two barrels of corn to the King of the Manoakin at Manoakin Town. He was sued by Randall Revell in Somerset County court for a minor debt on 13 January 1674/5 and appeared as a witness in a court case against Revell. The justices were at first doubtful about admitting the testimony of an African American against a white person. However, his testimony was allowed after he assured the court that he was a Christian and "did rightly understand the taking of an oath." He gave his age as thirty-seven in his deposition in 1670. He testified again in 1676 and was witness to several deeds. Edward Surman appointed him as guardian ("assistant") to his children by his will which was proved in Somerset County court on 10 January 1676/7 [Archives of Maryland 54:675, 707, 712; Judicial Records 1670-71, 10, 15, 6, 205; 1671-5, 41, 260, 267-8, 429, 457; 1675-1677, 47, 78]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, where he received a patent for 400 acres on Rehoboth Bay in September 1677. He purchased 200 acres in Sussex County and sold this land by deed which he acknowledged in court in April 1683. In August 1683 he was accused of murdering his wife, Susan. The court took depositions from John Okey and Jeffry Summerford, and released him because they saw "no sign of murder." He appeared in Sussex County court as a witness on seven occasions between March 1680/81 and February 1688. He sued John Okey for debt in May 1685. And he was a defendant on sixteen occasions, mainly for debts. The court postponed action on one of these cases because he was in Virginia between December 1684 and May 1685. He was identified as a "Negro" on only three of these occasions; one was a case in which he had the estate of Nathaniel Bradford in his custody. In August 1704 he was called "John Johnson, Free Nigroe, Aged Eighty Years and Poor and Past his Labour" when the Sussex County court agreed to maintain him for his lifetime on public funds. He was apparently still living in November 1707 when Walter Groombridge had a suit against him for a debt of ?3 [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 103, 110, 144, 166, 190, 193, 204, 214, 216, 229, 235, 251, 253, 299, 315, 342, 356, 365, 384, 447, 462, 516, 540, 635, 797, 857, 919, 1201, 1314]. John1's children were 4 i. John2, born perhaps 1650. ii. Anthony2, born perhaps 1655, who was devised a cow and a calf by the will of his grandmother, Mary Johnson. He was a sued in Sussex County, Delaware Court on 7 May 1706 and was a witness in a Sussex County case in November 1709 [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1227, 1291]. iii. ?Joan2, "Negro," married John Puckham, a baptized Monie tribesman, on 25 February 1682/3 in Somerset County, Maryland [Register of Liber IKL, Somerset Courthouse, cited by Torrence, Old Somerset, 143]. See the Puckham history. iv. an unnamed son, born say 1667. William Futcher claimed in February 1689 Sussex County court that Johnson's son had been bound to serve him for nine years. The suit was canceled because of Futcher's death [Court Records 1680-99, 294, 322, 342]. Perhaps this was William Johnson "Molater" who bound himself to serve Ralph Doe Carpenter of Somerset County for four years on 2 June 1700 in order to pay his debts. On 31 March 1702 the Somerset County court ruled the indenture was insufficient and set William at liberty [Judicial Record 1701-2, 105-6]. v. ?Comfort, born say 1680, "free Nigrene," presented by the Sussex County, Delaware Court for having a bastard child in 1699. James Walker of Rehoboth Bay agreed to pay her fine and give her a three year old heifer in exchange for her serving him an additional thirteen months, and she bound her two-year-old son to him until the age of twenty-one [Court Records 1680-99, 768, 774, 775]. In February 1706 she confessed to having a bastard child by Justice William Bagwell's servant, Patrick Delany, and in May 1706 she admitted to having a child by Rice Morgan [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1218, 1219, 1276, 1281].(1) 3. Richard1 Johnson, born about 1632, was one of the five persons his father claimed head rights for in 1651. On 8 February 1653 Governor Richard Bennett instructed Nathaniel Littleton to deliver a black cow to him. On 28 September 1652 he claimed two headrights, and on 21 November 1654 he received a patent for 100 acres in Northampton County adjoining his father and his brother John [ODW 1651-54, fol.103, p.133; Patents 1652-55, 296]. On 19 January 1663/4 he was called "Richard Johnson negro" when he brought suit in Accomack County court against Richard Buckland about a house he had built for Buckland [DW 1663-66, 54]. He remained in Accomack County on 50 acres left to him by his father when his father took the rest of the family to Maryland [Accomack DW 1664-71, p.12-fol.12]. He purchased 590 acres near Matomkin from Christopher Tompson in December 1675 and conveyed half this land to his son Francis in 1678 [WD 1676-90, 14; Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1088]. He was taxable in Accomack County on 2 tithes from 1676 to 168? (called Richard Johnson, Sen.) [Orders 1676-8, 34, 57; WDO 1678-82, 18, 100]. He was involved in a number of court cases in Accomack County. He was sued for debt by Christopher Thompson on 14 September 1677 [Orders 1676-8, 66, 84]. On 17 November 1681 his suit against (his son) Richard Johnson, Jr., was dismissed; on 18 October 1682 he admitted to the court that he owed William Parker 682 pounds of tobacco; on 3 December 1684 he admitted that he owed Walter Harges 1,000 pounds of tobacco, and he was sued by John Cole for 5,978 pounds of tobacco. He died before 19 March 1689 when his wife Susan Johnson, called a widow, was sued by Hendrick Johnson for some cooper's work he had performed for her after her husband's death [WDO 1678-82, 55, 155, 268, 322]. She came into court to give account of the estate of William Silverthorne which included several yards of linen lent to "Richard Johnson Negro Since deceased" [W&Co 1682-97, 142, 155, 157]. She may have been white since their son Richard was called a "Mulatto." Their children were i. Francis, born perhaps 1655, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift. He apprenticed himself to George Phebus in Somerset County for three years to be a cooper in November 1673 [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-2, 336-7]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, with his uncle, John1 Johnson, by 8 September 1685 when he was summoned as a witness in a court case between William Futcher and John Crew [Court Records 1680-99, 99]. He sued Henry Stretcher in Sussex Court in November 1686, and he was called "Francis Johnson, the Negro" in June 1687 when the court ordered William Orion to pay him 20 shillings for taking up his runaway servant, John Martin.(2) He testified in court for Henry Stretcher in October 1687. He was in Accomack County about February 1689 (called "Francis Johnson Mollatto" and "Brother" of Richard Johnson) when he agreed to complete a fence which Richard contracted to build for Colonel John West. In 1689 he sold the land in Accomack County which his father had conveyed to him in 1678 in order to pay a debt of 6,000 pounds of tobacco [WD 1676-90, 507a, 508; W&cO 1682-97, 155a, 156, 187-187a]. He was living on land adjoining William Futcher in Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County, in December 1690 and testified in Sussex County in March 1693 in a case between John Barker and Aminadab Handsor [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 757; Court Records 1680-99, 600]. He was called a "Mollatto" on 30 March 1699 when he purchased 300 acres, called "Rotten," on the north side of Indian River in Sussex County, Delaware [DB A-1:83, 226]. On 4 November 1707 Hill Drummond brought suit against him in Accomack County court for uttering scandalous words [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. On 8 April 1713 he paid Comfort Driggers' fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for the illegitimate child she had in Accomack County earlier that year. Perhaps Elizabeth Johnson, who gave evidence against Comfort, was a relation of his [Orders 1710-4, 56a, 58]. He was security in Accomack County court for Edward Winslow and his wife Anne who failed to appear to answer Thomas Dashiell and Ephraim Heather of Somerset County [Orders 1714-7, 19].(3) He may have been the Fran. Johnson who William Driggus appointed as one of the executors of his 7 June 1720 Somerset County will [WB 17:285]. ii. Richard2, born say 1660, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-162]. He and his wife, Anne Johnson, were servants of John Cole of Accomack County in 1680. She was required to serve her former master, William Whittington, an additional four years for having two illegitimate children while in his service [Northampton Orders 1678-83, 34; Accomack WDO 1678-82, 288-9]. On 3 September 1679 he was called Richard Johnson, Jr., when John Cole and his wife sued him in Accomack County court for kicking Mrs. Cole. On 5 August 1681 he deposed that about Christmas of 1680 he was the servant of John Cole of Motamkin [WDO 1678-82, 108, 288]. On 3 April 1688 Adam Michael sued him for 5,000 pounds of tobacco as a penalty for his nonperformance of a bond, and on 20 December 1688 Colonel John West sued him for failure to build a fence consisting of 400 wood panels for his cornfield (called "Richard Johnson Mollatto"). Richard completed only 40 or 50 of the panels before turning the work over to "his Brother Francis Johnson" in exchange for a gun and several other items. On 16 June 1689 Captain William Custis won a suit against him for about ?1. Maximillian Gore acted as his security. He was a tithable head of an Accomack County household in 1692. Esther Pharis identified him as the father of her illegitimate child who was born on 4 June 1695 [W&cO 1682-97, 129a, 132a, 150a, 155a, 156, 160, 258a; Orders 1690-9, 153, 173]. He was called "Richard Johnson, Mollattoe" in September 1699 when the Sussex County, Delaware Court presented him for stealing a mare belonging to William Faucett of Somerset County. He was excused after explaining that he had already returned the mare, "taking of the Mare threw mistake, being so like his mare" [Court Records 1680-99, 780]. On 8 October 1707 he was called Richard Johnson "Mulatta" in Accomack County court when Hill Drummond brought a suit against him for debt [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. He may have been the Richard Johnson of Carteret County, North Carolina, who purchased 130 acres on Core Sound on the east side of North River from George Cogdell and sold this land on 2 October 1724 to (his nephew?) Jacob Johnson and (his niece's husband?) Theophilus Norwood. The deed was proved by John Simpson and Enoch Ward, who also proved the will of (his brother?) William1 Johnson [DB C:113-4]. 4. John2 Johnson, born perhaps 1650, was named as John Sr.'s son in 1670 when they recorded their livestock brand in Somerset County, Maryland [Archives of Maryland 54:757]. On 29 August 1677 he purchased a 44 acre lot on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay and south side of the Wicomico River which he named "Angola." This land probably adjoined "Tonys Vineyard" where his grandmother was then living [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 20:224-5; Davidson, Free Blacks, 29]. The land was escheated in 1706 with the notation, "no heirs as I understand" [Maryland Provincial Rent Roll, Vol. no. 1, 34]. He was in Sussex County, Delaware, in December 1680 when he was fined for singing "a scurlous disgracfull song" about Samuel Gray and his wife and would have been whipped if William Futcher had not posted security for him. He married Elizabeth Lowe (an English woman) in Sussex County, Delaware, on 13 March 1680/1 [Court Records 1680-99, 2, 23]. She was probably the Elizabeth Johnson who was twenty years old on 14 August 1683 when she appeared as a witness in court. He apparently left the county sometime before February 1683/4 when he was accused of killing a sow belonging to Andrew Depree and taking the meat to John Okey's house [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 228, 260]. On 5 March 1699/1700 the Kent County, Delaware Court referred to him and his wife as "John Johnson a free Negroe, and Elizabeth his wife (an English woman)" when they were accused of running away and leaving their seven year old daughter, Susannah, in the custody of Thomas Nicholls. The court bound her to Nicholls until the age of eighteen [Court Records 1699-1703, 14]. He may have been identical to John Johnson "Negro" who was sued in Cecil County court on 14 June 1710 for failure to pay his taxes in 1707, 1708 (on two tithes), and 1709. He was called a "Negro" in the same court when Paul Phillips sued him for debt and he sued Anne Millener. On 31 September 1704 he bound his daughter Sarah Johnson, who was about seven or eight years old, to Paul Phillips until the age of twenty-one. Phillips had assigned the indenture to Thomas Wouleston by 9 June 1713 when the court ordered her to serve the remainder of her time to him according to her indenture [Judgment Records 1708-16, 70, 71, 85, 88-9, 202]. John was the father of i. ?John3, born say 1682, a "Malattoe" servant boy ordered by the Sussex County, Delaware Court in September 1698 to serve his master, Justice John Hill, another seven months for running away for a month [Court Records 1680-99, 744]. ii. Susannah, born about 1693. iii. Sarah, born about 1696-1697, seven or eight years old on 31 September 1704 when her father bound her as an apprentice to Paul Phillips in Cecil County. Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were most likely: i. Sarah, a "Malatto" who was the servant of Nathaniel Horsey in Annamessex Hundred, Somerset County, when she admitted that she had an illegitimate child by "Ned Negroe" belonging to her master [Judicial Record 1713-15, 176, 219; 1715-17, 43-4]. ii. William, a "Molatto," died before 25 July 1778 when John Rowland was granted administration on his Sussex County estate. His inventory amounted to ?122 and included a parcel of books and carpenter's tools His widow received ?16 as her third and ?38 was distributed to the unnamed heirs [RG 4545, roll 132, frames 244-6]. iii. Thomas, born say 1750, a "Melato," owed 5 shillings to the Worcester County estate of Mr. Alexander Buncle on 3 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 72:137-42]. iv. Sabra, born say 1750, a "free Mallatto," admitted to the Worcester County, Maryland Court in June 1769 that she had an illegitimate child by Ned Dutton in November 1768. She paid her fine and James Riggan of Pocomoke Hundred paid her court costs [Proceedings 1769-79, 40]. v. Milby, convicted of assaulting John Regua/ Ridgeway in February 1754 Sussex County court [Delaware Archives RG4815.017, 1753-1760, frames 49, 66, 86], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County from 1773 to 1777, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:488]. He died about 1805 when Mary Johnson was granted administration on his estate [RG 4545, roll 131, frame 290]. vi. John5, a taxable "Molattoe" in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777. vii. William, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1790. viii. George, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:798]. ix. Levi, head of a Somerset County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:491]. x. Rachel, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. Other Johnson families: 1. William Johnson, born say 1705, a "free negro," petitioned the Prince George's County court on 27 June 1732 saying that he came into Maryland as a free man with Captain William Spaven who sold him as a slave to Colonel Joseph Belt. Captain Spaven testified that he met up with William Johnson in London, that Johnson stated that he was in great necessity, asked what voyage he was bound out on, and agreed to go with him to Maryland. When they arrived in Maryland, Spaven sold Johnson to Colonel Belt for his lifetime. The court ruled that Johnson serve five years from the time of his arrival in 1729 [Court Record 1730-2, 541]. He may have been the ancestor of some of the members of the Johnson family who were free on the Western Shore: i. Polly, head of a Baltimore Town household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. ii. Michael, head of a Washington County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:644]. iii. Rachel, head of a Montgomery County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:236]. iv. Nicholas, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. v. Susanna, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. vi. James, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. Talbot County 1. Margery Johnson, born say 1698, the servant of Clement Sale, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1717 that she had a child by Phoenix, a "Negro planter" of St. Peter's Parish [Judgment Record 1717-9, 6-7]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Frederick, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:517]. ii. John, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162]. iii. Robert, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162]. iv. Suky, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:674]. Somerset County 1. Abigail Johnson,born say 1740, was the servant of Andrew Francis Chaney of Somerset Parish, Somerset County, on 16 March 1761 when she confessed that she had a child by Hector, a "Negro" slave of Thomas Williams. The court ordered her sold for seven years and ordered her son David sold for thirty-one years [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b-131]. She was the mother of i. David, born about January 1762, head of a Lewis and Rehobeth, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:302]. Another member of a Johnson family was i. Abraham, a "Malatto man" listed in the inventory of the Dorchester County estate of Govert Loockerman on 18 August 1728 with one year left to serve [Prerogative Court Inventories 1728-9, 13:184]. Endnotes: 1. Patrick Delaney's age was adjudged as thirteen years by the Accomack County, Virginia Court on 7 February 1700 [Orders 1697-1703, 84]. 2. Francis Johnson was identified by race in only one of the seven times he was named in Sussex County court [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 356, 425, 468, 481, 720, 757, 863]. 3. Edward Winslow provided security for William Driggers in Somerset County court when he was convicted of having an illegitimate child by Mary Winslow [Somerset County Judicial Records 1707-11, 95-6].
All Fields in This Record
State Virginia
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Accomack, Somerset, Sussex,
Family Name Johnson
Family History Notes The Johnson family originated in Northampton County, Virginia, before 1650. Members of the family were in Somerset County, Maryland, by 1665, in Delaware by 1677, and in North Carolina by 1720. Included below are the members of the family who moved to Maryland and Delaware during the colonial period. For the complete family history, see the Johnson History in the Virginia section. 1. Anthony1 Johnson "Negro," probably born about 1600, was free before 10 January 1647 when he purchased a calf from James Berry by deed proved in Northampton County, Virginia [ODW 1651-54, 123]. He patented 250 acres in Northampton County at "great Naswattock Creek" for the transportation of five persons including his son, Richard Johnson, on 24 July 1651 [Patents 1643-51, 326]. His wife, Mary, and their two daughters were excused from paying taxes by the Northampton County, Virginia Court on 28 February 1652 [ODW 1651-54, fol.161]. In 1665 he and his wife Mary, his son John, and his wife Susanna, and their slave John Casor moved to Somerset County, Maryland with Randall Revell and Ann Toft, who claimed them and many whites as head rights for 2,350 acres of land [Patents 8:495-6]. Anthony and his wife sold 250 acres of their own land, left 50 acres to their son, Richard, and took fourteen head of cattle, a mare, and eighteen sheep with them [Accomack DW 1664-71, fol.10; p.12-fol.12]. On 10 September 1666 he leased 300 acres in Somerset County on the south side of Wicomico Creek in Wicomico Hundred, called "Tonies Vinyard," for two hundred years [Land Records O-1:32-33]. He apparently died before August 1670 when "a jury of white men" in Accomack County decided that his land should be escheated since "he was a Negroe and by consequence an alien" [Virginia Genealogist 2:20, 109-113]. His lease in Somerset County, Maryland, was renegotiated by his widow, Mary, for ninety-nine years with the provision that her sons, John and Richard, would assume the lease after her death [Land Records O-2, 20-21]. Her slave, John Casor, recorded his livestock brand in court with her consent on 3 September 1672, and she recorded her mark a few weeks later on Mary recorded her livestock mark on 26 September 1672 [Archives of Maryland 54:760-1]. He was called "John Cazara Negro" when he was a witness (signing) to a power of attorney by which she assigned her son, John, authority over her property and authority to sue for some debts in Virginia, and he was also witness on 3 September 1672 to her deed of gift to her grandchildren. She called herself "Mary Johnson ... Negro (the relict of Anthony Johnson ... Negro deceased)" in the deed by which she gave cattle to her three grandchildren, Anthony, Richard, and Francis [Somerset County Judicial Record 1671-75, 159-62]. She was called "Mary Johnson of Wiccocomoco ... widow" in July 1676 when she purchased a mare and assigned it to John Corsala (her slave) [Somerset County Judicial Record 1675-7, 95]. She was called executor of Anthony Johnson deceased on 17 January 1690 when Edward Revell acted as her attorney in a suit she brought in Accomack County court [WDO 1678-82, 154]. She was living in Sussex County, Delaware, in March 1693/4 when Mary Okey appeared in court to support her complaint that her son, John, was not maintaining her as he had promised [Court Records 1680-99, 646, 655]. The children of Anthony and Mary Johnson were 2 i. John1, say 1631. 3 ii. Richard1, born about 1632. iii. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the Northampton County court in February 1652, perhaps the Joan1 Johnson who in 1657 received 100 acres in Northampton County from "Deabendanba, Kinge of nusangs," being land next to her brother, John [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671]. iv. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the Northampton County court in February 1652. 2. John1 Johnson, born say 1631, received a grant for 550 acres in Northampton County on 10 May 1652 "at great Naswattock Cr. adjacent to 200 acres granted Anthony Johnson" for the importation of 11 persons including Mary Johnson [Patents 3:101]. He received this patent after suing a white resident of the county, also named John Johnson, who tried to illegally take possession of the land. In 1660 he was head of a household of two tithables in Northampton County, called John Johnson Negro [DW 1657-66, 57-58, 103; DW 1651-54, fol.200]. He and his wife, Susanna, sold their land in 1664 [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671]. In November 1654 he and Mary Gersheene, an African American servant of his father were punished for fornication [ODW 1654-55, fol.35, ODW 1651-54 p.226-fol.226]. On 17 January 1664/5 his wife, Susannah, petitioned the Northampton County court to release him from jail where he was held for begetting a child by Hannah Leach who was probably white [Orders 1664-74, fol.92]. In 1665 he moved to Somerset County, Maryland, with his parents. He was called "John Johnson Negro" on 11 March 1667/8 when he and two white men, Alexander King and John Richards, were charged in Somerset County court with stealing corn from an Indian named Katackcuweiticks. They confessed their guilt and were ordered to deliver two barrels of corn to the King of the Manoakin at Manoakin Town. He was sued by Randall Revell in Somerset County court for a minor debt on 13 January 1674/5 and appeared as a witness in a court case against Revell. The justices were at first doubtful about admitting the testimony of an African American against a white person. However, his testimony was allowed after he assured the court that he was a Christian and "did rightly understand the taking of an oath." He gave his age as thirty-seven in his deposition in 1670. He testified again in 1676 and was witness to several deeds. Edward Surman appointed him as guardian ("assistant") to his children by his will which was proved in Somerset County court on 10 January 1676/7 [Archives of Maryland 54:675, 707, 712; Judicial Records 1670-71, 10, 15, 6, 205; 1671-5, 41, 260, 267-8, 429, 457; 1675-1677, 47, 78]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, where he received a patent for 400 acres on Rehoboth Bay in September 1677. He purchased 200 acres in Sussex County and sold this land by deed which he acknowledged in court in April 1683. In August 1683 he was accused of murdering his wife, Susan. The court took depositions from John Okey and Jeffry Summerford, and released him because they saw "no sign of murder." He appeared in Sussex County court as a witness on seven occasions between March 1680/81 and February 1688. He sued John Okey for debt in May 1685. And he was a defendant on sixteen occasions, mainly for debts. The court postponed action on one of these cases because he was in Virginia between December 1684 and May 1685. He was identified as a "Negro" on only three of these occasions; one was a case in which he had the estate of Nathaniel Bradford in his custody. In August 1704 he was called "John Johnson, Free Nigroe, Aged Eighty Years and Poor and Past his Labour" when the Sussex County court agreed to maintain him for his lifetime on public funds. He was apparently still living in November 1707 when Walter Groombridge had a suit against him for a debt of ?3 [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 103, 110, 144, 166, 190, 193, 204, 214, 216, 229, 235, 251, 253, 299, 315, 342, 356, 365, 384, 447, 462, 516, 540, 635, 797, 857, 919, 1201, 1314]. John1's children were 4 i. John2, born perhaps 1650. ii. Anthony2, born perhaps 1655, who was devised a cow and a calf by the will of his grandmother, Mary Johnson. He was a sued in Sussex County, Delaware Court on 7 May 1706 and was a witness in a Sussex County case in November 1709 [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1227, 1291]. iii. ?Joan2, "Negro," married John Puckham, a baptized Monie tribesman, on 25 February 1682/3 in Somerset County, Maryland [Register of Liber IKL, Somerset Courthouse, cited by Torrence, Old Somerset, 143]. See the Puckham history. iv. an unnamed son, born say 1667. William Futcher claimed in February 1689 Sussex County court that Johnson's son had been bound to serve him for nine years. The suit was canceled because of Futcher's death [Court Records 1680-99, 294, 322, 342]. Perhaps this was William Johnson "Molater" who bound himself to serve Ralph Doe Carpenter of Somerset County for four years on 2 June 1700 in order to pay his debts. On 31 March 1702 the Somerset County court ruled the indenture was insufficient and set William at liberty [Judicial Record 1701-2, 105-6]. v. ?Comfort, born say 1680, "free Nigrene," presented by the Sussex County, Delaware Court for having a bastard child in 1699. James Walker of Rehoboth Bay agreed to pay her fine and give her a three year old heifer in exchange for her serving him an additional thirteen months, and she bound her two-year-old son to him until the age of twenty-one [Court Records 1680-99, 768, 774, 775]. In February 1706 she confessed to having a bastard child by Justice William Bagwell's servant, Patrick Delany, and in May 1706 she admitted to having a child by Rice Morgan [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1218, 1219, 1276, 1281].(1) 3. Richard1 Johnson, born about 1632, was one of the five persons his father claimed head rights for in 1651. On 8 February 1653 Governor Richard Bennett instructed Nathaniel Littleton to deliver a black cow to him. On 28 September 1652 he claimed two headrights, and on 21 November 1654 he received a patent for 100 acres in Northampton County adjoining his father and his brother John [ODW 1651-54, fol.103, p.133; Patents 1652-55, 296]. On 19 January 1663/4 he was called "Richard Johnson negro" when he brought suit in Accomack County court against Richard Buckland about a house he had built for Buckland [DW 1663-66, 54]. He remained in Accomack County on 50 acres left to him by his father when his father took the rest of the family to Maryland [Accomack DW 1664-71, p.12-fol.12]. He purchased 590 acres near Matomkin from Christopher Tompson in December 1675 and conveyed half this land to his son Francis in 1678 [WD 1676-90, 14; Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1088]. He was taxable in Accomack County on 2 tithes from 1676 to 168? (called Richard Johnson, Sen.) [Orders 1676-8, 34, 57; WDO 1678-82, 18, 100]. He was involved in a number of court cases in Accomack County. He was sued for debt by Christopher Thompson on 14 September 1677 [Orders 1676-8, 66, 84]. On 17 November 1681 his suit against (his son) Richard Johnson, Jr., was dismissed; on 18 October 1682 he admitted to the court that he owed William Parker 682 pounds of tobacco; on 3 December 1684 he admitted that he owed Walter Harges 1,000 pounds of tobacco, and he was sued by John Cole for 5,978 pounds of tobacco. He died before 19 March 1689 when his wife Susan Johnson, called a widow, was sued by Hendrick Johnson for some cooper's work he had performed for her after her husband's death [WDO 1678-82, 55, 155, 268, 322]. She came into court to give account of the estate of William Silverthorne which included several yards of linen lent to "Richard Johnson Negro Since deceased" [W&Co 1682-97, 142, 155, 157]. She may have been white since their son Richard was called a "Mulatto." Their children were i. Francis, born perhaps 1655, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift. He apprenticed himself to George Phebus in Somerset County for three years to be a cooper in November 1673 [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-2, 336-7]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, with his uncle, John1 Johnson, by 8 September 1685 when he was summoned as a witness in a court case between William Futcher and John Crew [Court Records 1680-99, 99]. He sued Henry Stretcher in Sussex Court in November 1686, and he was called "Francis Johnson, the Negro" in June 1687 when the court ordered William Orion to pay him 20 shillings for taking up his runaway servant, John Martin.(2) He testified in court for Henry Stretcher in October 1687. He was in Accomack County about February 1689 (called "Francis Johnson Mollatto" and "Brother" of Richard Johnson) when he agreed to complete a fence which Richard contracted to build for Colonel John West. In 1689 he sold the land in Accomack County which his father had conveyed to him in 1678 in order to pay a debt of 6,000 pounds of tobacco [WD 1676-90, 507a, 508; W&cO 1682-97, 155a, 156, 187-187a]. He was living on land adjoining William Futcher in Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County, in December 1690 and testified in Sussex County in March 1693 in a case between John Barker and Aminadab Handsor [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 757; Court Records 1680-99, 600]. He was called a "Mollatto" on 30 March 1699 when he purchased 300 acres, called "Rotten," on the north side of Indian River in Sussex County, Delaware [DB A-1:83, 226]. On 4 November 1707 Hill Drummond brought suit against him in Accomack County court for uttering scandalous words [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. On 8 April 1713 he paid Comfort Driggers' fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for the illegitimate child she had in Accomack County earlier that year. Perhaps Elizabeth Johnson, who gave evidence against Comfort, was a relation of his [Orders 1710-4, 56a, 58]. He was security in Accomack County court for Edward Winslow and his wife Anne who failed to appear to answer Thomas Dashiell and Ephraim Heather of Somerset County [Orders 1714-7, 19].(3) He may have been the Fran. Johnson who William Driggus appointed as one of the executors of his 7 June 1720 Somerset County will [WB 17:285]. ii. Richard2, born say 1660, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-162]. He and his wife, Anne Johnson, were servants of John Cole of Accomack County in 1680. She was required to serve her former master, William Whittington, an additional four years for having two illegitimate children while in his service [Northampton Orders 1678-83, 34; Accomack WDO 1678-82, 288-9]. On 3 September 1679 he was called Richard Johnson, Jr., when John Cole and his wife sued him in Accomack County court for kicking Mrs. Cole. On 5 August 1681 he deposed that about Christmas of 1680 he was the servant of John Cole of Motamkin [WDO 1678-82, 108, 288]. On 3 April 1688 Adam Michael sued him for 5,000 pounds of tobacco as a penalty for his nonperformance of a bond, and on 20 December 1688 Colonel John West sued him for failure to build a fence consisting of 400 wood panels for his cornfield (called "Richard Johnson Mollatto"). Richard completed only 40 or 50 of the panels before turning the work over to "his Brother Francis Johnson" in exchange for a gun and several other items. On 16 June 1689 Captain William Custis won a suit against him for about ?1. Maximillian Gore acted as his security. He was a tithable head of an Accomack County household in 1692. Esther Pharis identified him as the father of her illegitimate child who was born on 4 June 1695 [W&cO 1682-97, 129a, 132a, 150a, 155a, 156, 160, 258a; Orders 1690-9, 153, 173]. He was called "Richard Johnson, Mollattoe" in September 1699 when the Sussex County, Delaware Court presented him for stealing a mare belonging to William Faucett of Somerset County. He was excused after explaining that he had already returned the mare, "taking of the Mare threw mistake, being so like his mare" [Court Records 1680-99, 780]. On 8 October 1707 he was called Richard Johnson "Mulatta" in Accomack County court when Hill Drummond brought a suit against him for debt [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. He may have been the Richard Johnson of Carteret County, North Carolina, who purchased 130 acres on Core Sound on the east side of North River from George Cogdell and sold this land on 2 October 1724 to (his nephew?) Jacob Johnson and (his niece's husband?) Theophilus Norwood. The deed was proved by John Simpson and Enoch Ward, who also proved the will of (his brother?) William1 Johnson [DB C:113-4]. 4. John2 Johnson, born perhaps 1650, was named as John Sr.'s son in 1670 when they recorded their livestock brand in Somerset County, Maryland [Archives of Maryland 54:757]. On 29 August 1677 he purchased a 44 acre lot on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay and south side of the Wicomico River which he named "Angola." This land probably adjoined "Tonys Vineyard" where his grandmother was then living [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 20:224-5; Davidson, Free Blacks, 29]. The land was escheated in 1706 with the notation, "no heirs as I understand" [Maryland Provincial Rent Roll, Vol. no. 1, 34]. He was in Sussex County, Delaware, in December 1680 when he was fined for singing "a scurlous disgracfull song" about Samuel Gray and his wife and would have been whipped if William Futcher had not posted security for him. He married Elizabeth Lowe (an English woman) in Sussex County, Delaware, on 13 March 1680/1 [Court Records 1680-99, 2, 23]. She was probably the Elizabeth Johnson who was twenty years old on 14 August 1683 when she appeared as a witness in court. He apparently left the county sometime before February 1683/4 when he was accused of killing a sow belonging to Andrew Depree and taking the meat to John Okey's house [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 228, 260]. On 5 March 1699/1700 the Kent County, Delaware Court referred to him and his wife as "John Johnson a free Negroe, and Elizabeth his wife (an English woman)" when they were accused of running away and leaving their seven year old daughter, Susannah, in the custody of Thomas Nicholls. The court bound her to Nicholls until the age of eighteen [Court Records 1699-1703, 14]. He may have been identical to John Johnson "Negro" who was sued in Cecil County court on 14 June 1710 for failure to pay his taxes in 1707, 1708 (on two tithes), and 1709. He was called a "Negro" in the same court when Paul Phillips sued him for debt and he sued Anne Millener. On 31 September 1704 he bound his daughter Sarah Johnson, who was about seven or eight years old, to Paul Phillips until the age of twenty-one. Phillips had assigned the indenture to Thomas Wouleston by 9 June 1713 when the court ordered her to serve the remainder of her time to him according to her indenture [Judgment Records 1708-16, 70, 71, 85, 88-9, 202]. John was the father of i. ?John3, born say 1682, a "Malattoe" servant boy ordered by the Sussex County, Delaware Court in September 1698 to serve his master, Justice John Hill, another seven months for running away for a month [Court Records 1680-99, 744]. ii. Susannah, born about 1693. iii. Sarah, born about 1696-1697, seven or eight years old on 31 September 1704 when her father bound her as an apprentice to Paul Phillips in Cecil County. Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were most likely: i. Sarah, a "Malatto" who was the servant of Nathaniel Horsey in Annamessex Hundred, Somerset County, when she admitted that she had an illegitimate child by "Ned Negroe" belonging to her master [Judicial Record 1713-15, 176, 219; 1715-17, 43-4]. ii. William, a "Molatto," died before 25 July 1778 when John Rowland was granted administration on his Sussex County estate. His inventory amounted to ?122 and included a parcel of books and carpenter's tools His widow received ?16 as her third and ?38 was distributed to the unnamed heirs [RG 4545, roll 132, frames 244-6]. iii. Thomas, born say 1750, a "Melato," owed 5 shillings to the Worcester County estate of Mr. Alexander Buncle on 3 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 72:137-42]. iv. Sabra, born say 1750, a "free Mallatto," admitted to the Worcester County, Maryland Court in June 1769 that she had an illegitimate child by Ned Dutton in November 1768. She paid her fine and James Riggan of Pocomoke Hundred paid her court costs [Proceedings 1769-79, 40]. v. Milby, convicted of assaulting John Regua/ Ridgeway in February 1754 Sussex County court [Delaware Archives RG4815.017, 1753-1760, frames 49, 66, 86], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County from 1773 to 1777, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:488]. He died about 1805 when Mary Johnson was granted administration on his estate [RG 4545, roll 131, frame 290]. vi. John5, a taxable "Molattoe" in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777. vii. William, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1790. viii. George, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:798]. ix. Levi, head of a Somerset County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:491]. x. Rachel, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. Other Johnson families: 1. William Johnson, born say 1705, a "free negro," petitioned the Prince George's County court on 27 June 1732 saying that he came into Maryland as a free man with Captain William Spaven who sold him as a slave to Colonel Joseph Belt. Captain Spaven testified that he met up with William Johnson in London, that Johnson stated that he was in great necessity, asked what voyage he was bound out on, and agreed to go with him to Maryland. When they arrived in Maryland, Spaven sold Johnson to Colonel Belt for his lifetime. The court ruled that Johnson serve five years from the time of his arrival in 1729 [Court Record 1730-2, 541]. He may have been the ancestor of some of the members of the Johnson family who were free on the Western Shore: i. Polly, head of a Baltimore Town household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. ii. Michael, head of a Washington County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:644]. iii. Rachel, head of a Montgomery County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:236]. iv. Nicholas, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. v. Susanna, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. vi. James, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246]. Talbot County 1. Margery Johnson, born say 1698, the servant of Clement Sale, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1717 that she had a child by Phoenix, a "Negro planter" of St. Peter's Parish [Judgment Record 1717-9, 6-7]. She may have been the ancestor of i. Frederick, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:517]. ii. John, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162]. iii. Robert, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162]. iv. Suky, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:674]. Somerset County 1. Abigail Johnson,born say 1740, was the servant of Andrew Francis Chaney of Somerset Parish, Somerset County, on 16 March 1761 when she confessed that she had a child by Hector, a "Negro" slave of Thomas Williams. The court ordered her sold for seven years and ordered her son David sold for thirty-one years [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b-131]. She was the mother of i. David, born about January 1762, head of a Lewis and Rehobeth, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:302]. Another member of a Johnson family was i. Abraham, a "Malatto man" listed in the inventory of the Dorchester County estate of Govert Loockerman on 18 August 1728 with one year left to serve [Prerogative Court Inventories 1728-9, 13:184]. Endnotes: 1. Patrick Delaney's age was adjudged as thirteen years by the Accomack County, Virginia Court on 7 February 1700 [Orders 1697-1703, 84]. 2. Francis Johnson was identified by race in only one of the seven times he was named in Sussex County court [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 356, 425, 468, 481, 720, 757, 863]. 3. Edward Winslow provided security for William Driggers in Somerset County court when he was convicted of having an illegitimate child by Mary Winslow [Somerset County Judicial Records 1707-11, 95-6].
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Family Name Jones
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Jones, born say 1707, was living in St. Peter's Parish in November 1727 when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had a mixed-race child by a "Negroe." The court sold her and her eight-week-old child to Thomas Wiles [Judgment Record 1727-8, 352]. She may have been the ancestor of i. William, a "Mulatto," admitted to the Kent County court in November 1774 that he had an illegitimate child by Rachel Clark. They were fined 30 shillings [Criminal Dockets 1774-6, dockets 63, 64]. ii. David, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. iii. Aimy, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:508]. Other members of the Jones family on the Eastern Shore were i. Peter, a "Negro" baptized on 10 May 1768 by Father Joseph Mosley of St. Joseph's Mission. John Tucker, "Negro," and Esther, "Negro," were the godparents [Wright, Vital Records of the Jesuit Missions, 4]. Peter was head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162]. ii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Kent, Queen Anne's
Family Name Jones
Family History Notes 1. Sarah Jones, born say 1707, was living in St. Peter's Parish in November 1727 when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had a mixed-race child by a "Negroe." The court sold her and her eight-week-old child to Thomas Wiles [Judgment Record 1727-8, 352]. She may have been the ancestor of i. William, a "Mulatto," admitted to the Kent County court in November 1774 that he had an illegitimate child by Rachel Clark. They were fined 30 shillings [Criminal Dockets 1774-6, dockets 63, 64]. ii. David, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. iii. Aimy, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:508]. Other members of the Jones family on the Eastern Shore were i. Peter, a "Negro" baptized on 10 May 1768 by Father Joseph Mosley of St. Joseph's Mission. John Tucker, "Negro," and Esther, "Negro," were the godparents [Wright, Vital Records of the Jesuit Missions, 4]. Peter was head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162]. ii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.
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Family Name Coursey/Kersey
Family History Notes 1. Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of i. Nero, born in February 1741/2. ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790. iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen. Other members of the Coursey/ Kersey family were i. George Kersey, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790, perhaps identical to George Course who was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:937]. ii. John, a "negro" taxable who was living at Jasper Petticoat's in Upper Newfoundland and Seneca Hundred, Montgomery County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-5, p.25]. iii. Ralph Corse, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:114] and 4 in 1810 [DE:56]. iv. William Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:314]. v. John Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306]. vi. Elizabeth Kearse, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 17 September 1810: of a blackish colour ... born free, raised in Talbot County, aged about 43 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 14]. vii. Caesar Corse, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. viii. William Coursey, head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. ix. Edmund, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169]. x. James2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 4 May 1815: yellow complexion .. born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 23 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 25].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Sussex, Cecil, Dorchester
Family Name Coursey/Kersey
Family History Notes 1. Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of i. Nero, born in February 1741/2. ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790. iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen. Other members of the Coursey/ Kersey family were i. George Kersey, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790, perhaps identical to George Course who was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:937]. ii. John, a "negro" taxable who was living at Jasper Petticoat's in Upper Newfoundland and Seneca Hundred, Montgomery County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-5, p.25]. iii. Ralph Corse, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:114] and 4 in 1810 [DE:56]. iv. William Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:314]. v. John Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306]. vi. Elizabeth Kearse, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 17 September 1810: of a blackish colour ... born free, raised in Talbot County, aged about 43 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 14]. vii. Caesar Corse, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. viii. William Coursey, head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. ix. Edmund, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169]. x. James2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 4 May 1815: yellow complexion .. born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 23 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 25].
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Family Name Lacount/Lecompte
Family History Notes Members of the Lacount/ Lecompte family in Maryland and Delaware were 1 i. Thomas1 Lacount, born say 1740. ii. William1 Lecompte, born say 1742, a "Black Man," head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 51]. 1. Thomas1 Lacount, born say 1740, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1765 to 1770, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1773 to 1776, in Little Creek from 1781 to 1787, in Duck Creek in 1788, and in 1789 his name was crossed off the Little Creek Hundred list and he was listed as a delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 508, 520, 553, 566; 1768-84, frames 10, 26, 66, 180, 220, 258, 270, 503, 542, 570, 583, 620; 1785-97, frame 24, 49, 72, 74, 103, 128, 174]. He died before 12 January 1796 when William Lacount was granted administration on his Duck Creek Hundred estate. Hester Lacount, widow of Thomas Lacount, Senr, returned an inventory valued at 39 pounds [RG 3545, roll 132, frames 311-317]. He may have been the father of i. William2, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred on a horse and 5 hogs in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 490, 575; 1797-8, 358, 406]. ii. John, born say 1765, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1786 to 1789, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 49, 72, 74, 106, 197, 575; 1797-8, frame 358, 406]. iii. Thomas2, born say 1770, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 490, 575; 1797-8, 358, 406], married to Letitia Durham on 30 June 1794 when he received her portion of the distribution of the estate of her father John Durham's Little Creek Hundred estate [RG 3545, roll 68, frames 612-23], perhaps the Thomas Lecompte who was head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:724]. iv. Elizabeth, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:8], perhaps the mother of Joseph Lacount, born about 1780 in Delaware, a "Mulatto" head of a Spruce Ward, Philadelphia household with wife Mary in 1850 [family no. 201]. v. James, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-8, frame 333].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Kent
Family Name Lacount/Lecompte
Family History Notes Members of the Lacount/ Lecompte family in Maryland and Delaware were 1 i. Thomas1 Lacount, born say 1740. ii. William1 Lecompte, born say 1742, a "Black Man," head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 51]. 1. Thomas1 Lacount, born say 1740, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1765 to 1770, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1773 to 1776, in Little Creek from 1781 to 1787, in Duck Creek in 1788, and in 1789 his name was crossed off the Little Creek Hundred list and he was listed as a delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 508, 520, 553, 566; 1768-84, frames 10, 26, 66, 180, 220, 258, 270, 503, 542, 570, 583, 620; 1785-97, frame 24, 49, 72, 74, 103, 128, 174]. He died before 12 January 1796 when William Lacount was granted administration on his Duck Creek Hundred estate. Hester Lacount, widow of Thomas Lacount, Senr, returned an inventory valued at 39 pounds [RG 3545, roll 132, frames 311-317]. He may have been the father of i. William2, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred on a horse and 5 hogs in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 490, 575; 1797-8, 358, 406]. ii. John, born say 1765, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1786 to 1789, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 49, 72, 74, 106, 197, 575; 1797-8, frame 358, 406]. iii. Thomas2, born say 1770, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 490, 575; 1797-8, 358, 406], married to Letitia Durham on 30 June 1794 when he received her portion of the distribution of the estate of her father John Durham's Little Creek Hundred estate [RG 3545, roll 68, frames 612-23], perhaps the Thomas Lecompte who was head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:724]. iv. Elizabeth, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:8], perhaps the mother of Joseph Lacount, born about 1780 in Delaware, a "Mulatto" head of a Spruce Ward, Philadelphia household with wife Mary in 1850 [family no. 201]. v. James, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-8, frame 333].
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Family Name Lee
Family History Notes 1. Money Lee, born say 1725, a "Spinster white woman," confessed in Dorchester County court in November 1754 that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe" on 10 December 1753 [Judgment Record 1754-5, 125-6]. She was probably the ancestor of 2 i. Rachel, born say 10 December 1753. 3 ii. David, born say 1770. iii. Sarah, born say 1773, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:656]. She was the mother of Rachel Denwood, born about 1792, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 3 August 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Sarah Lee who was convicted for having a child by a slave, aged about 23 years. iv. Henry, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:695]. v. Draper, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:655]. vi. Robert, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:727]. 2. Rachel Lee, born say 10 December 1753, was convicted of having a child by a slave in Dorchester County. She was the mother of i. Leah Baltimore, born say 1776, mother of Mahala Baltimore, born about 1796, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 June 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... daughter of Leah Baltimore who was the daughter of Rachel Lee who was convicted and sold for having a child by a slave, aged about 19 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 26, 27]. ii. Levin Johnson, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 September 1815: of a yellowish colour ... born free and is the son of Rachel Lee who was convicted and sold for having a illegitimate child, aged about 35 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 29]. 3. David Lee, born say 1770, was head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:715]. He was the father of i. Nancy Bishop Lee, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 7 December 1827: of a light chesnut colour, was born free and raised in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Nancy Lee who was manumitted by David Lee, aged about 18 years, granted on information of David Lee [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 57]. ii. Major, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 April 1828: light chesnut colour ... born free, and is the son of David Lee aged about 26 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 58]. iii. Pleasant Cornish, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 May 1824: of a chesnut colour ... daughter of David Lee a freeman, aged about 20 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 50]. iv. Abraham, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 April 1828: dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of David Lee, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 58].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties
Family Name Lee
Family History Notes 1. Money Lee, born say 1725, a "Spinster white woman," confessed in Dorchester County court in November 1754 that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe" on 10 December 1753 [Judgment Record 1754-5, 125-6]. She was probably the ancestor of 2 i. Rachel, born say 10 December 1753. 3 ii. David, born say 1770. iii. Sarah, born say 1773, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:656]. She was the mother of Rachel Denwood, born about 1792, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 3 August 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Sarah Lee who was convicted for having a child by a slave, aged about 23 years. iv. Henry, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:695]. v. Draper, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:655]. vi. Robert, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:727]. 2. Rachel Lee, born say 10 December 1753, was convicted of having a child by a slave in Dorchester County. She was the mother of i. Leah Baltimore, born say 1776, mother of Mahala Baltimore, born about 1796, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 June 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... daughter of Leah Baltimore who was the daughter of Rachel Lee who was convicted and sold for having a child by a slave, aged about 19 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 26, 27]. ii. Levin Johnson, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 September 1815: of a yellowish colour ... born free and is the son of Rachel Lee who was convicted and sold for having a illegitimate child, aged about 35 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 29]. 3. David Lee, born say 1770, was head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:715]. He was the father of i. Nancy Bishop Lee, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 7 December 1827: of a light chesnut colour, was born free and raised in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Nancy Lee who was manumitted by David Lee, aged about 18 years, granted on information of David Lee [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 57]. ii. Major, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 April 1828: light chesnut colour ... born free, and is the son of David Lee aged about 26 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 58]. iii. Pleasant Cornish, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 May 1824: of a chesnut colour ... daughter of David Lee a freeman, aged about 20 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 50]. iv. Abraham, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 April 1828: dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of David Lee, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 58].
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Family Name Littlejohns
Family History Notes 1. Jane Little Johns, born say 1725, was the servant of Joshua Hopkins of St. Peter's Parish in March 1747/8 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having a "Mullatto" child by a "Negro." The court sold her fifteen-month-old daughter Mary to Edward Barwick until the age of thirty one. She was the servant of Jonathan Shannahan in June 1754 when she admitted in Talbot County court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she serve her master another twelve months for the trouble of his house and then that she be sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1747-51, n.p.; 1751-5, n.p.]. She was the mother of 2 i. Mary, born about December 1746. 2. Mary Littlejohn, born about December 1746, confessed in Talbot County court on 10 May 1768 that she had a child by a "Negro" slave. The court sold her for seven years to William Rigon for 4 shillings and sold her "Mulatto" child Francis to Rigon for 3 shillings [Criminal Record 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. Francis, born about 1768.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Littlejohns
Family History Notes 1. Jane Little Johns, born say 1725, was the servant of Joshua Hopkins of St. Peter's Parish in March 1747/8 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having a "Mullatto" child by a "Negro." The court sold her fifteen-month-old daughter Mary to Edward Barwick until the age of thirty one. She was the servant of Jonathan Shannahan in June 1754 when she admitted in Talbot County court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she serve her master another twelve months for the trouble of his house and then that she be sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1747-51, n.p.; 1751-5, n.p.]. She was the mother of 2 i. Mary, born about December 1746. 2. Mary Littlejohn, born about December 1746, confessed in Talbot County court on 10 May 1768 that she had a child by a "Negro" slave. The court sold her for seven years to William Rigon for 4 shillings and sold her "Mulatto" child Francis to Rigon for 3 shillings [Criminal Record 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. Francis, born about 1768.
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Family Name Longo
Family History Notes 1. Anthony Longo, born say 1625, was called Tony Longo "a negro" on 1 February 1647 when the Northampton County, Virginia Court ordered him to pay his debt of 384 pounds of tobacco to Francis White. He was taxable on one tithe in Northampton County in 1660 [Orders 1657-64, 102]. Edmund Morgan in "American Slavery - American Freedom" quoted a confrontation Anthony had with a Northampton County court official as evidence that racism had not yet taken hold on the Eastern Shore in the seventeenth century and how quickly Africans assumed typical English disdain for authority: Anthony Longo: What shall I go to Mr. Walkers for: go about your business you idle rascal: I told him I had a warrant for him: shitt of your warrant have I nothing to do but go to Mr. Walker, go about your business you idle rascal as did likewise his wife, with such noise that I could hardly hear my own words, when I had done reading the warrant: stroke at me, and gave me some blows [Orders DW&c 1654-5, 60a]. He was apparently the father of 2 i. James1, born say 1652. 2. James1 Longo born say 1652, was a tithable head of household in Accomack County from 1676 to 1692 [Orders 1676-78, 32, 58, 1678-82, 17, 101; W&cO 1682-97, 192, 228a, 258a]. He was a delinquent Accomack County militiaman in January 1685. On 20 September 1687 he and Jane Fitzgerald posted bond for Dorothy Bestick, servant of George Nicholas Hack of Pungoteague, who was presented by the court for having an illegitimate child by "George Francis Negro Slave to ye sd Geo Nich Hack." In 1687 Dorothy bound her daughter Sarah to him until the age of eighteen years [W&cO 1682-97, 57, 119a, 142a]. (On 19 February 1690 Dorothy Bestick was presented for having another illegitimate child [W&cO 1682-97, 175a, 181a, 187]. Perhaps her descendants were the two John Bosticks who were heads of "other free" Kent County, Delaware households in 1810 [DE:185, 188]). On 20 September 1687 James was fined 100 pounds of tobacco for assaulting Richard Shulster. Shulster testified that when he passed by James Longo's house on horseback, James ... leaped over his fence furiously ... laye hold of ye Deponts. horses bridle ... calling the deponent Rogue, Rascall, and severall other scurrilous words over and over againe threatning to beate him and asked me why I did not come to pay him a dayes work ... layd his hands on my shoulder in a violent manner ... caused great paine. The next day he brought suit in court against Shulster. He was sued by William Twyford on 20 November 1689 for failing to perform carpentry work which he had contracted for, and on 16 June 1691 the Accomack County court presented him for working on holy days [W&cO 1682-97, 119, 170a]. He was called James Longo "the Molatta" on 21 February 1694 when he was presented by the grand jury for turning a road which passed through his land [Orders 1690-7, 32, 123a, 124a]. On 2 April 1706 he petitioned the Accomack County court to permit him to turn this road. The court gave him permission to do so as long as the new road was as near to or nearer to Pungoteague and was well maintained. The court was not satisfied with the new road, and on 9 October 1707 the justices ordered him to reopen the original road. On 5 May 1708 he posted bond for the illegitimate child he had by Isabel Hutton (a white woman) who was presented by the court on 3 June 1707 for having a "Mulatto Bastard Child." On 5 May 1708 she testified in Accomack County court that James Longo "negro or mullatto" was the father of the child she was pregnant with, and on 5 August the same year she was called "Isabel Hutton who lives at James Longoes" when she was convicted of "having a Bastard Child by a Mulatto." The same court ordered that he be arrested for acting in a contemptuous manner when an officer of the court attempted to serve him with a warrant [Orders 1703-9, 68, 74, 98, 101a, 114, 114a, 122, 125]. He left a 13 August 1729 Accomack will, proved 1 September 1730. He left 70 acres of his land to his son James, 70 acres to his daughter Mary Huten, and 70 acres to his daughter Elizabeth, and the remainder of his estate to his wife Isabel. His wife and daughters were executrices of the will [Wills 1729-37, pt.1, 101]. His children were i. ?Ann, born say 1683, a "Mallatta Woman" living at William Smith's who was presented by the Prince George's County court on 28 March 1703/4 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Ann Congo," servant of William Smith, on 22 August 1704 when he paid her fine [Court Record 1699-1705, 289a, 309a]. ii. James2, taxable head of a Matapany Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household in 1727, and head of a household in Wicomoco Hundred from 1731 to 1740: taxable on Nathaniel Morris from 1737 to 1740 [List of Tithables]. He was called James Longer, Carpenter, on 5 June 1733 when he purchased 100 acres called Pole Hamilton on the southeast side of the south east arm of the Rockawakin River in Worcester County for 15 pounds [DB:AZ:108]. On 17 June 1735 the Somerset County court bound out Nathaniel Morris, orphan son of George Morris, to him to make linen and woolen wheels and chairs and to read and write. James was called wheelwright in November 1737 when he sued blacksmith John Farlo for 7 pounds. On 20 March 1738/9 the court allowed him 90 pounds of tobacco for three day testimony in the case of His Lordship against Isaac Saddler and granted him a licence to keep an ordinary. In March 1740/1 Thomas and William Selby were indicted by the Somerset County court for stealing seven turkeys from him [Judicial Record 1735-7, 14; 1737-8, 152; 1738-40, 75, 110; 1740-2, 92, 96]. iii. Elizabeth, living in Stepney Parish in March 1737/8 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by Richard Jones. James Longo was her security [Judicial Record 1737-8, 208]. iv. Mary Hutton, born about 1708. Her descendants were John Hutton, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 1 "other free" in 1800 and Sarah Hutton, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:198]. One of their Longo descendants was i. Daniel, "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1797 and 1798 [Assessments, frames 7, 483].
All Fields in This Record
State Virginia
County (Primary) Northampton
Other Counties Accomack, Somerset, Kent
Family Name Longo
Family History Notes 1. Anthony Longo, born say 1625, was called Tony Longo "a negro" on 1 February 1647 when the Northampton County, Virginia Court ordered him to pay his debt of 384 pounds of tobacco to Francis White. He was taxable on one tithe in Northampton County in 1660 [Orders 1657-64, 102]. Edmund Morgan in "American Slavery - American Freedom" quoted a confrontation Anthony had with a Northampton County court official as evidence that racism had not yet taken hold on the Eastern Shore in the seventeenth century and how quickly Africans assumed typical English disdain for authority: Anthony Longo: What shall I go to Mr. Walkers for: go about your business you idle rascal: I told him I had a warrant for him: shitt of your warrant have I nothing to do but go to Mr. Walker, go about your business you idle rascal as did likewise his wife, with such noise that I could hardly hear my own words, when I had done reading the warrant: stroke at me, and gave me some blows [Orders DW&c 1654-5, 60a]. He was apparently the father of 2 i. James1, born say 1652. 2. James1 Longo born say 1652, was a tithable head of household in Accomack County from 1676 to 1692 [Orders 1676-78, 32, 58, 1678-82, 17, 101; W&cO 1682-97, 192, 228a, 258a]. He was a delinquent Accomack County militiaman in January 1685. On 20 September 1687 he and Jane Fitzgerald posted bond for Dorothy Bestick, servant of George Nicholas Hack of Pungoteague, who was presented by the court for having an illegitimate child by "George Francis Negro Slave to ye sd Geo Nich Hack." In 1687 Dorothy bound her daughter Sarah to him until the age of eighteen years [W&cO 1682-97, 57, 119a, 142a]. (On 19 February 1690 Dorothy Bestick was presented for having another illegitimate child [W&cO 1682-97, 175a, 181a, 187]. Perhaps her descendants were the two John Bosticks who were heads of "other free" Kent County, Delaware households in 1810 [DE:185, 188]). On 20 September 1687 James was fined 100 pounds of tobacco for assaulting Richard Shulster. Shulster testified that when he passed by James Longo's house on horseback, James ... leaped over his fence furiously ... laye hold of ye Deponts. horses bridle ... calling the deponent Rogue, Rascall, and severall other scurrilous words over and over againe threatning to beate him and asked me why I did not come to pay him a dayes work ... layd his hands on my shoulder in a violent manner ... caused great paine. The next day he brought suit in court against Shulster. He was sued by William Twyford on 20 November 1689 for failing to perform carpentry work which he had contracted for, and on 16 June 1691 the Accomack County court presented him for working on holy days [W&cO 1682-97, 119, 170a]. He was called James Longo "the Molatta" on 21 February 1694 when he was presented by the grand jury for turning a road which passed through his land [Orders 1690-7, 32, 123a, 124a]. On 2 April 1706 he petitioned the Accomack County court to permit him to turn this road. The court gave him permission to do so as long as the new road was as near to or nearer to Pungoteague and was well maintained. The court was not satisfied with the new road, and on 9 October 1707 the justices ordered him to reopen the original road. On 5 May 1708 he posted bond for the illegitimate child he had by Isabel Hutton (a white woman) who was presented by the court on 3 June 1707 for having a "Mulatto Bastard Child." On 5 May 1708 she testified in Accomack County court that James Longo "negro or mullatto" was the father of the child she was pregnant with, and on 5 August the same year she was called "Isabel Hutton who lives at James Longoes" when she was convicted of "having a Bastard Child by a Mulatto." The same court ordered that he be arrested for acting in a contemptuous manner when an officer of the court attempted to serve him with a warrant [Orders 1703-9, 68, 74, 98, 101a, 114, 114a, 122, 125]. He left a 13 August 1729 Accomack will, proved 1 September 1730. He left 70 acres of his land to his son James, 70 acres to his daughter Mary Huten, and 70 acres to his daughter Elizabeth, and the remainder of his estate to his wife Isabel. His wife and daughters were executrices of the will [Wills 1729-37, pt.1, 101]. His children were i. ?Ann, born say 1683, a "Mallatta Woman" living at William Smith's who was presented by the Prince George's County court on 28 March 1703/4 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Ann Congo," servant of William Smith, on 22 August 1704 when he paid her fine [Court Record 1699-1705, 289a, 309a]. ii. James2, taxable head of a Matapany Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household in 1727, and head of a household in Wicomoco Hundred from 1731 to 1740: taxable on Nathaniel Morris from 1737 to 1740 [List of Tithables]. He was called James Longer, Carpenter, on 5 June 1733 when he purchased 100 acres called Pole Hamilton on the southeast side of the south east arm of the Rockawakin River in Worcester County for 15 pounds [DB:AZ:108]. On 17 June 1735 the Somerset County court bound out Nathaniel Morris, orphan son of George Morris, to him to make linen and woolen wheels and chairs and to read and write. James was called wheelwright in November 1737 when he sued blacksmith John Farlo for 7 pounds. On 20 March 1738/9 the court allowed him 90 pounds of tobacco for three day testimony in the case of His Lordship against Isaac Saddler and granted him a licence to keep an ordinary. In March 1740/1 Thomas and William Selby were indicted by the Somerset County court for stealing seven turkeys from him [Judicial Record 1735-7, 14; 1737-8, 152; 1738-40, 75, 110; 1740-2, 92, 96]. iii. Elizabeth, living in Stepney Parish in March 1737/8 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by Richard Jones. James Longo was her security [Judicial Record 1737-8, 208]. iv. Mary Hutton, born about 1708. Her descendants were John Hutton, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 1 "other free" in 1800 and Sarah Hutton, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:198]. One of their Longo descendants was i. Daniel, "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1797 and 1798 [Assessments, frames 7, 483].
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Family Name McDaniel/McDonald
Family History Notes 1. Johanna McDaniel/ McDonald, born say 1720, confessed in Dorchester County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate "Mollatta" child by a "Negroe" on 10 May 1745. Her unnamed son was bound apprentice to Joseph Sherwood until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1744-5, 474]. On 25 March 1751 she was the spinster servant of Henry Fidderman of Queen Anne's County when she confessed to having a child by a "Negroe." The court sold her son Daniel to Thomas Dockey for 16 shillings. She was called Joanna McDonald admitted to having another child named William by a "Negro" in court in June 1753. He was sold to John Emory for 620 pounds of tobacco. In June 1757 and November 1759 she was convicted of having other children for which she received only a fine [Criminal Record 1751-9, 13-4, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. Daniel McDaniel, "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790, called Daniel McDonald, when he was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:355]. ii. William, born about 1753.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties Queen Anne
Family Name McDaniel/McDonald
Family History Notes 1. Johanna McDaniel/ McDonald, born say 1720, confessed in Dorchester County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate "Mollatta" child by a "Negroe" on 10 May 1745. Her unnamed son was bound apprentice to Joseph Sherwood until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1744-5, 474]. On 25 March 1751 she was the spinster servant of Henry Fidderman of Queen Anne's County when she confessed to having a child by a "Negroe." The court sold her son Daniel to Thomas Dockey for 16 shillings. She was called Joanna McDonald admitted to having another child named William by a "Negro" in court in June 1753. He was sold to John Emory for 620 pounds of tobacco. In June 1757 and November 1759 she was convicted of having other children for which she received only a fine [Criminal Record 1751-9, 13-4, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. Daniel McDaniel, "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790, called Daniel McDonald, when he was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:355]. ii. William, born about 1753.
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Family Name Madden
Family History Notes 1. Margaret Madden, born say 1705, the servant of Edward Needles of St. Peter's Parish, was convicted by the Talbot County court in March 1724/5 of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." The following year in March 1725/6 she confessed to having another child by Sampson, the slave of Aaron Parrot. In November 1727 she confessed to having another illegitimate child by a "Negroe," and the court bound her daughter Grace to her master until the age of thirty-one. In November 1730 the court sold her to her master for twenty-eight years for four convictions and sold her son Isaac, born 29 May 1730, to her master for 4,000 pounds of tobacco. She was convicted and sold for another term of seven years in June 1733, and was called Margaret Maddin a white woman in June 1742 when she was convicted of the same offence and ordered to serve a sixth term of seven years and the court sold her daughter Rose until the age of thirty one [Judgment Record 1725-6, 64-5, 480-1; 1726 (reverse), 44, 56, 62; 1727-8, 345; 1728-31, 312; 1731-3, 673; 1742, 93-4]. She was the mother of 2 i. Grace, born about 1727. ii. Isaac, born 29 May 1730, a "Mulatto" servant for whom Edward Needles posted 40 pounds security in Talbot County in August 1755 for his appearance to answer charges of having a child by a white woman named Rachel Dee. Charles Manslip and Patrick McQuay were Rachel's security. Isaac and Rachel were found guilty and each paid a fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 12-14]. 3 iii. Rachel1, born say 1735. iv. Sampson, born about 1738, a fourteen-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of thirty-one when he was listed in the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. 4 v. Rose, born say 1742. 2. Grace Madden, born about 1727, confessed to the Talbot County court in March 1744/5 that she had an illegitimate child for which she received ten lashes. She was called Grace Madden, Junr., in November 1747 when she was ordered to serve Edward Needles for the trouble of his house. In August 1748 the court ordered that she receive 10 lashes for fornication and bound her son John to Edward Needles until the age of twenty-one [Judgment Record 1744-5, 230-1; Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the "Mulatto" servant of Edward Needles in November 1750 when she was ordered to serve another seven years for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court sold her daughter Sarah to Needles until the age of thirty-one [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.]. In March 1752 the Talbot County court convicted her of having two illegitimate "Mullato" children by a "Negroe" slave. The court ordered her sold for seven years for each offense and sold her daughters Margaret and Elizabeth to Edward Needles until the age of thirty-one. In August 1753 she was convicted of the same offense, and the court sold her son Daniel to Needles until the age of thirty-one for 5 shillings. In November 1755 she had another child by a "Negro," was sold for another seven years, and the court sold her eight-month-old daughter Rachel to Elizabeth Needles for 5 shillings. And she admitted to the same offense in November 1758 and November 1761 when the court sold her daughter Jane to Edward Needles. In November 1770 the court convicted her of having a child by a free person, ordered that she pay a fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings for having a child named Levin [Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.; 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 15-16, 255; 1761-7, 13; 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. John, born about 1748. ii. Sarah, born about 1750. iii. Margaret, born about 1751. iv. Elizabeth, born about 1752. v. Daniel, born about 1753. vi. Rachel2, born about March 1755, paid a 60 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in August 1777 for having an illegitimate child and refusing to identify the father. John Needles was security for her maintenance of her daughter Martha [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.]. vii. Jane, born about 1761. viii. Levin, born about 1770, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:531]. 3. Rachel1 Madden, born say 1735, was the spinster "Mulatto" servant of Elizabeth Needles of St. Peter's Parish, Talbot County, in November 1752 when the court convicted her of having a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe" person. The court ordered her sold for seven years after the completion of her service and sold her son Martin to her mistress for 5 shillings. In June 1755 she was convicted of the same offense and the court sold her daughter Sarah to William Weathers until the age of thirty-one for 30 shillings. She had another daughter Ruth by a "Negroe" which she admitted to in Talbot County court in November 1756 [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 70-1]. She was the mother of i. Martin, born about September 1752, a four-year-old "Mollatto" boy listed in the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756, with twenty-seven years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:444], head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:506]. ii. Sarah, born about January 1755, paid a 30 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in June 1780 for having an illegitimate child [Criminal Record 1777, n.p.]. iii. Ruth, born about 1756. 4. Rose Madden, born say 1742, was a fifteen-year-old "Mollatto" girl listed in the inventory of the the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 with sixteen more years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. She was the spinster servant of Edward Needles in March 1765 when she admitted in Talbot County court that she had a child by a "Negro." The court sold her son Dick to her master until the age of thirty one for 7 shillings. She admitted to the same offense in August 1766. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and sold her son Jim to Thomas Cannon until the age of thirty one for 12 shillings [Criminal Record 1761-7, 334-5, 468]. She was the mother of i. Dick, born about 1764. ii. James, born about 1766. They were the ancestors of i. Wm Tiz, born about 1740, an eight-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. Will was a twelve-year-old "Mollatto" boy bound until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. ii. John1, born about 1749, a four-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of twenty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. Jack was an eight-year-old "Mollatto" bound until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. iii. Benjamin, born about 1751, a three-year-old "Melator" serving to the age of twenty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. iv. Esther, born say 1757, paid a 60 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in November 1777 for having an illegitimate child and refusing to identify the father. George Burgess was security for her maintenance of her daughter Sophia [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.]. v. Ruth, born say 1758, paid a 30 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in August 1777 for having an illegitimate child. Elizabeth Broadway was security for her maintenance of the child [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.]. vi. Rebecca Maden, born say 1767, head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. 5 vii. John2, born say 1770. viii. Levin, born say 1773, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:531]. ix. Jenney, born say 1775, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:536]. x. George, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. xi. William, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830. xii. Toby, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 9 September 1815: a light Black man ... about 28 years of age, 5 feet 6 1/2 inches high [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 13]. xiii. John3, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 28 August 1811: a black man ... about twenty three years of age, five feet Seven Inches and Three quarters ... rather of a bright Complexion was born free and that he was raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 53]. xiv. William, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 27 July 1813: born free and raised in the County ... about 23 years of age, five feet 4 3/4 inches high of a dark Mullatto Colour [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 72]. 5. John2 Madan, born say 1770, and his wife, Elizabeth, "free Mulattoes," baptized their children in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland, on 17 September 1797. John Madden was head of a Baltimore County household of 2 "free colored" in in 1830. They were the parents of i. William, born 24 July 1791, baptized 17 September 1797. ii. George, born 5 February 1797, baptized 17 September 1797 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:111].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Madden
Family History Notes 1. Margaret Madden, born say 1705, the servant of Edward Needles of St. Peter's Parish, was convicted by the Talbot County court in March 1724/5 of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." The following year in March 1725/6 she confessed to having another child by Sampson, the slave of Aaron Parrot. In November 1727 she confessed to having another illegitimate child by a "Negroe," and the court bound her daughter Grace to her master until the age of thirty-one. In November 1730 the court sold her to her master for twenty-eight years for four convictions and sold her son Isaac, born 29 May 1730, to her master for 4,000 pounds of tobacco. She was convicted and sold for another term of seven years in June 1733, and was called Margaret Maddin a white woman in June 1742 when she was convicted of the same offence and ordered to serve a sixth term of seven years and the court sold her daughter Rose until the age of thirty one [Judgment Record 1725-6, 64-5, 480-1; 1726 (reverse), 44, 56, 62; 1727-8, 345; 1728-31, 312; 1731-3, 673; 1742, 93-4]. She was the mother of 2 i. Grace, born about 1727. ii. Isaac, born 29 May 1730, a "Mulatto" servant for whom Edward Needles posted 40 pounds security in Talbot County in August 1755 for his appearance to answer charges of having a child by a white woman named Rachel Dee. Charles Manslip and Patrick McQuay were Rachel's security. Isaac and Rachel were found guilty and each paid a fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 12-14]. 3 iii. Rachel1, born say 1735. iv. Sampson, born about 1738, a fourteen-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of thirty-one when he was listed in the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. 4 v. Rose, born say 1742. 2. Grace Madden, born about 1727, confessed to the Talbot County court in March 1744/5 that she had an illegitimate child for which she received ten lashes. She was called Grace Madden, Junr., in November 1747 when she was ordered to serve Edward Needles for the trouble of his house. In August 1748 the court ordered that she receive 10 lashes for fornication and bound her son John to Edward Needles until the age of twenty-one [Judgment Record 1744-5, 230-1; Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the "Mulatto" servant of Edward Needles in November 1750 when she was ordered to serve another seven years for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court sold her daughter Sarah to Needles until the age of thirty-one [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.]. In March 1752 the Talbot County court convicted her of having two illegitimate "Mullato" children by a "Negroe" slave. The court ordered her sold for seven years for each offense and sold her daughters Margaret and Elizabeth to Edward Needles until the age of thirty-one. In August 1753 she was convicted of the same offense, and the court sold her son Daniel to Needles until the age of thirty-one for 5 shillings. In November 1755 she had another child by a "Negro," was sold for another seven years, and the court sold her eight-month-old daughter Rachel to Elizabeth Needles for 5 shillings. And she admitted to the same offense in November 1758 and November 1761 when the court sold her daughter Jane to Edward Needles. In November 1770 the court convicted her of having a child by a free person, ordered that she pay a fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings for having a child named Levin [Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.; 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 15-16, 255; 1761-7, 13; 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. John, born about 1748. ii. Sarah, born about 1750. iii. Margaret, born about 1751. iv. Elizabeth, born about 1752. v. Daniel, born about 1753. vi. Rachel2, born about March 1755, paid a 60 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in August 1777 for having an illegitimate child and refusing to identify the father. John Needles was security for her maintenance of her daughter Martha [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.]. vii. Jane, born about 1761. viii. Levin, born about 1770, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:531]. 3. Rachel1 Madden, born say 1735, was the spinster "Mulatto" servant of Elizabeth Needles of St. Peter's Parish, Talbot County, in November 1752 when the court convicted her of having a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe" person. The court ordered her sold for seven years after the completion of her service and sold her son Martin to her mistress for 5 shillings. In June 1755 she was convicted of the same offense and the court sold her daughter Sarah to William Weathers until the age of thirty-one for 30 shillings. She had another daughter Ruth by a "Negroe" which she admitted to in Talbot County court in November 1756 [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 70-1]. She was the mother of i. Martin, born about September 1752, a four-year-old "Mollatto" boy listed in the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756, with twenty-seven years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:444], head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:506]. ii. Sarah, born about January 1755, paid a 30 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in June 1780 for having an illegitimate child [Criminal Record 1777, n.p.]. iii. Ruth, born about 1756. 4. Rose Madden, born say 1742, was a fifteen-year-old "Mollatto" girl listed in the inventory of the the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 with sixteen more years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. She was the spinster servant of Edward Needles in March 1765 when she admitted in Talbot County court that she had a child by a "Negro." The court sold her son Dick to her master until the age of thirty one for 7 shillings. She admitted to the same offense in August 1766. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and sold her son Jim to Thomas Cannon until the age of thirty one for 12 shillings [Criminal Record 1761-7, 334-5, 468]. She was the mother of i. Dick, born about 1764. ii. James, born about 1766. They were the ancestors of i. Wm Tiz, born about 1740, an eight-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. Will was a twelve-year-old "Mollatto" boy bound until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. ii. John1, born about 1749, a four-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of twenty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. Jack was an eight-year-old "Mollatto" bound until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. iii. Benjamin, born about 1751, a three-year-old "Melator" serving to the age of twenty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. iv. Esther, born say 1757, paid a 60 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in November 1777 for having an illegitimate child and refusing to identify the father. George Burgess was security for her maintenance of her daughter Sophia [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.]. v. Ruth, born say 1758, paid a 30 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in August 1777 for having an illegitimate child. Elizabeth Broadway was security for her maintenance of the child [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.]. vi. Rebecca Maden, born say 1767, head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. 5 vii. John2, born say 1770. viii. Levin, born say 1773, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:531]. ix. Jenney, born say 1775, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:536]. x. George, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. xi. William, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830. xii. Toby, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 9 September 1815: a light Black man ... about 28 years of age, 5 feet 6 1/2 inches high [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 13]. xiii. John3, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 28 August 1811: a black man ... about twenty three years of age, five feet Seven Inches and Three quarters ... rather of a bright Complexion was born free and that he was raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 53]. xiv. William, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 27 July 1813: born free and raised in the County ... about 23 years of age, five feet 4 3/4 inches high of a dark Mullatto Colour [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 72]. 5. John2 Madan, born say 1770, and his wife, Elizabeth, "free Mulattoes," baptized their children in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland, on 17 September 1797. John Madden was head of a Baltimore County household of 2 "free colored" in in 1830. They were the parents of i. William, born 24 July 1791, baptized 17 September 1797. ii. George, born 5 February 1797, baptized 17 September 1797 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:111].
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Family Name Magee
Family History Notes 1. Fortune Magee, born say 1687, was a servant of Mrs. Mary Day, called "Fortune a Mallatto girl," in March 1698/9 when she was convicted by the Somerset County court of stealing goods from James Maxwell, a merchant. The court also charged her mistress with encouraging her to steal the goods but found Mrs. Day guilty only of concealing the goods. On 15 June 1705 the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County who was married to George Magee at the time. On 7 March 1710/11 the court presented her for having four illegitimate children: one about seven years old, one five, one three and one three months old. On 8 August 1711 she confessed that Penny, "negroe" servant to Mr. Benjamin Wailer was the father of her child. On 6 August 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 129, 134, 167; 1702-5, 212, 251; 1707-11, 454; 1711-13, 40, 220]. Fortune was taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, in 1735 [List of Tithables]. Her children were i. Rose, born in March 1703. ii. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, a "mulatto" woman living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1745 to 1755 when her "mulatto" children, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were born. iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in August 1712 when she was bound apprentice. Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were i. Robert McGee, head of an Allegany County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:3]. ii. Susannah Megee, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391]. iii. Job Mcey, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:384]. iv. George, born before 1776, head of a Northwest Fork, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:242].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Magee
Family History Notes 1. Fortune Magee, born say 1687, was a servant of Mrs. Mary Day, called "Fortune a Mallatto girl," in March 1698/9 when she was convicted by the Somerset County court of stealing goods from James Maxwell, a merchant. The court also charged her mistress with encouraging her to steal the goods but found Mrs. Day guilty only of concealing the goods. On 15 June 1705 the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County who was married to George Magee at the time. On 7 March 1710/11 the court presented her for having four illegitimate children: one about seven years old, one five, one three and one three months old. On 8 August 1711 she confessed that Penny, "negroe" servant to Mr. Benjamin Wailer was the father of her child. On 6 August 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 129, 134, 167; 1702-5, 212, 251; 1707-11, 454; 1711-13, 40, 220]. Fortune was taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, in 1735 [List of Tithables]. Her children were i. Rose, born in March 1703. ii. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, a "mulatto" woman living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1745 to 1755 when her "mulatto" children, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were born. iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in August 1712 when she was bound apprentice. Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were i. Robert McGee, head of an Allegany County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:3]. ii. Susannah Megee, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391]. iii. Job Mcey, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:384]. iv. George, born before 1776, head of a Northwest Fork, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:242].
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Family Name Malavery
Family History Notes 1. Richard Malavery, born say 1695, was taxable in Manokin Hundred of Somerset County in Charles Revell's household in 1725 [List of Tithables, 1725]. He married Dinah Mongom (nee Harmon?), widow of Philip3 Mongom, about 1728 when she was a taxable in his Northampton County, Virginia, household. They were called Richard and Dinah Munlavery in the Northampton County list for 1731 [L.P. 1728-31]. They were probably the parents ofof 2 i. Dorcas, born say 1720. ii. Thomas, born say 1727, taxable in Manokin Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland in 1743 in the household of Isaac Baston. He was sued in Somerset County court by Smith Hersey in August 1747 for 13 pounds which he had signed a promissory note for on 11 May 1745. Thomas claimed that he should not have had to pay the note because he had signed it under duress while in prison. The court found in his favor and ordered Hersey to pay him 1,288 pounds of tobacco for his court costs [Judicial Record 1747-9, 17]. 2. Dorcas Malavery, born say 1720, was living in Coventry Parish on 20 March 1738/9 when the Somerset County court indicted her for having an illegitimate child. She confessed and named the father Jonas Miller who was called "Jonas Hogskin (Hodgskin) a "Mallatto" on 19 August 1739 when he confessed and was fined 30 shillings. She was apparently identical to the "mollatto woman Dorcas" named in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County will of Robert Boyer on 27 March 1746 which was proved on 12 April 1746: To negro man Harry, on my wife's decease, 50 acres and his freedom...To my mollatto woman Dorcas & all her children, on my wife's decease, their freedom & 4 head of good cattle [Prerogative Court Wills 24:397]. Dorcas sued James Ottley in Somerset County court on 18 August 1747 for detaining her as a servant. She was apparently identical to Dorcas "wife of Negro Harry" whose "Malatto" children were bound to Ottley by the same court [Judicial Record 1738-40, 74, 128, 171; 1747-49, 6, 10]. She was called Darkes Melavery when she was taxable in Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County, in 1749 and 1750 [List of Tithables, 1749, 1750] and called Dorcas Malavery in August 1750 when she petitioned the court saying that Ottley had sold one of her children to someone in Accomack County and was mistreating the other two. The case was dismissed with each party paying their own costs [Judicial Record 1749-51, 178]. The children of "Negro Harry and his wife Dorcas" were i. David, born in November 1739, "Malatto son of Negro Harry and Dorcas his wife," eight years old when he was bound apprentice to James Ottley on 18 August 1747. ii. Harry, born in November 1741, six years old when he was bound to James Ottley. iii. Elijah, born in October 1745, two years old when he was bound to James Ottley.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Malavery
Family History Notes 1. Richard Malavery, born say 1695, was taxable in Manokin Hundred of Somerset County in Charles Revell's household in 1725 [List of Tithables, 1725]. He married Dinah Mongom (nee Harmon?), widow of Philip3 Mongom, about 1728 when she was a taxable in his Northampton County, Virginia, household. They were called Richard and Dinah Munlavery in the Northampton County list for 1731 [L.P. 1728-31]. They were probably the parents ofof 2 i. Dorcas, born say 1720. ii. Thomas, born say 1727, taxable in Manokin Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland in 1743 in the household of Isaac Baston. He was sued in Somerset County court by Smith Hersey in August 1747 for 13 pounds which he had signed a promissory note for on 11 May 1745. Thomas claimed that he should not have had to pay the note because he had signed it under duress while in prison. The court found in his favor and ordered Hersey to pay him 1,288 pounds of tobacco for his court costs [Judicial Record 1747-9, 17]. 2. Dorcas Malavery, born say 1720, was living in Coventry Parish on 20 March 1738/9 when the Somerset County court indicted her for having an illegitimate child. She confessed and named the father Jonas Miller who was called "Jonas Hogskin (Hodgskin) a "Mallatto" on 19 August 1739 when he confessed and was fined 30 shillings. She was apparently identical to the "mollatto woman Dorcas" named in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County will of Robert Boyer on 27 March 1746 which was proved on 12 April 1746: To negro man Harry, on my wife's decease, 50 acres and his freedom...To my mollatto woman Dorcas & all her children, on my wife's decease, their freedom & 4 head of good cattle [Prerogative Court Wills 24:397]. Dorcas sued James Ottley in Somerset County court on 18 August 1747 for detaining her as a servant. She was apparently identical to Dorcas "wife of Negro Harry" whose "Malatto" children were bound to Ottley by the same court [Judicial Record 1738-40, 74, 128, 171; 1747-49, 6, 10]. She was called Darkes Melavery when she was taxable in Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County, in 1749 and 1750 [List of Tithables, 1749, 1750] and called Dorcas Malavery in August 1750 when she petitioned the court saying that Ottley had sold one of her children to someone in Accomack County and was mistreating the other two. The case was dismissed with each party paying their own costs [Judicial Record 1749-51, 178]. The children of "Negro Harry and his wife Dorcas" were i. David, born in November 1739, "Malatto son of Negro Harry and Dorcas his wife," eight years old when he was bound apprentice to James Ottley on 18 August 1747. ii. Harry, born in November 1741, six years old when he was bound to James Ottley. iii. Elijah, born in October 1745, two years old when he was bound to James Ottley.
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Family Name Miller
Family History Notes 1. Susannah Miller, born say 1684, was presented by the Somerset County court on 13 March 1704/5 for having an illegitimate "Mallato" child, William Hickman informer [Judicial Record 1702-5, 212].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties
Family Name Miller
Family History Notes 1. Susannah Miller, born say 1684, was presented by the Somerset County court on 13 March 1704/5 for having an illegitimate "Mallato" child, William Hickman informer [Judicial Record 1702-5, 212].
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Family Name Mitchell
Family History Notes 1. Anne Mitchell, born say 1705, the servant of John Edmondson of St. Peter's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in March 1724/5 that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." In November 1725 the court sold her daughter Esther to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was convicted of having a second mixed-race child in March 1726/7. In March 1727/8 the court sold her to her master for fourteen years. In March 1730/1 she was fined six hundred pounds of tobacco for having a child by Benjamin Guy alias Williams. Benjamin was ordered to serve Edmonson for one year to pay for their fines. She was fined for fornication again in March 1732/3 [Judgment Record 1723-4, 277; 1724, 38; 1725-6, 73-4; 1727-8, 23, 454; 1728-31, 349; 1731-3, 631]. She was the mother of i. Esther, born before 3 March 1723/4, bound to serve John Edmondson in November 1725 until the age of thirty-one. In November 1741 she was called a spinster "Mulatto" woman of St. Peter's Parish when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had two illegitimate children and paid a thirty shillings fine for each [Judgment Record 1740-2, 318-9].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Mitchell
Family History Notes 1. Anne Mitchell, born say 1705, the servant of John Edmondson of St. Peter's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in March 1724/5 that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." In November 1725 the court sold her daughter Esther to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was convicted of having a second mixed-race child in March 1726/7. In March 1727/8 the court sold her to her master for fourteen years. In March 1730/1 she was fined six hundred pounds of tobacco for having a child by Benjamin Guy alias Williams. Benjamin was ordered to serve Edmonson for one year to pay for their fines. She was fined for fornication again in March 1732/3 [Judgment Record 1723-4, 277; 1724, 38; 1725-6, 73-4; 1727-8, 23, 454; 1728-31, 349; 1731-3, 631]. She was the mother of i. Esther, born before 3 March 1723/4, bound to serve John Edmondson in November 1725 until the age of thirty-one. In November 1741 she was called a spinster "Mulatto" woman of St. Peter's Parish when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had two illegitimate children and paid a thirty shillings fine for each [Judgment Record 1740-2, 318-9].
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Family Name Moluck/Molock
Family History Notes Members of the Moluck family in Dorchester County were i. Jimmimey Molix, a Black Man," head of a household of 5 "Negroes" in Transquakin Hundred in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 50]. ii. Roger, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. iii. Moses, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1790. iv. Isaac, purchased his wife Moriah and son Isaac from Reubin Wittgot by Dorchester County deed on 13 May 1810 for 25 pounds and set them free [DB HD 17:177-9]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. v. John, a "Negro" man purchased by George Ward from Levin Traverse for the purpose of manumitting him on 16 July 1792. On 29 July 1801 Peter Ferguson and John Reid sold John Molock a horse and colt, cow and calf, five sheep, eight hogs, a blacksmith bellows, anvil, vice, three pair of tongs and five hammers for 20 pounds [DB HD 3:493; 26:383]. vi. Rhody, purchased her husband Isaac Molluck from John Watson by Dorchester County for $1 on 26 January 1814 and set him free the same day [DB ER-2:627-8]. vii. Polly, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 22 May 1810: a Mulatto Girl about eighteen years of age ... with straight hair, was born free and raised in Dorchester County [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 12].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties
Family Name Moluck/Molock
Family History Notes Members of the Moluck family in Dorchester County were i. Jimmimey Molix, a Black Man," head of a household of 5 "Negroes" in Transquakin Hundred in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 50]. ii. Roger, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. iii. Moses, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1790. iv. Isaac, purchased his wife Moriah and son Isaac from Reubin Wittgot by Dorchester County deed on 13 May 1810 for 25 pounds and set them free [DB HD 17:177-9]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. v. John, a "Negro" man purchased by George Ward from Levin Traverse for the purpose of manumitting him on 16 July 1792. On 29 July 1801 Peter Ferguson and John Reid sold John Molock a horse and colt, cow and calf, five sheep, eight hogs, a blacksmith bellows, anvil, vice, three pair of tongs and five hammers for 20 pounds [DB HD 3:493; 26:383]. vi. Rhody, purchased her husband Isaac Molluck from John Watson by Dorchester County for $1 on 26 January 1814 and set him free the same day [DB ER-2:627-8]. vii. Polly, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 22 May 1810: a Mulatto Girl about eighteen years of age ... with straight hair, was born free and raised in Dorchester County [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 12].
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Family Name Morris
Family History Notes Mixed-race members of the Morris family in Maryland and Delaware may have been related to William Morris "Mallatto" of Accomack County, Virginia [Orders 1703-9, 38, 42a]. They were 1 i. Nathaniel, born say 1722. 2 ii. Elizabeth1, born about 1726. iii. Thomas, born say 1728, a "mulato" taxable in Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County in 1748 [List of Tithables, 1748]. 1. Nathaniel1 Morris, born in October 1720, orphan son of George Morris, was bound by the Somerset County court as an apprentice to James Longo to make linen and woolen wheels and chairs and to read and write on 17 June 1735 [Judicial Record 1735-7, 14]. He was taxable in the household of James Longo in Wicomoco Hundred, Somerset County, from 1736 to 1740. He was also listed in his own household with wife Eliza in 1740 [List of Tithables]. He registered the birth of his son, Levi, in St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Sussex County, Delaware, on 17 January 1747/8 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 93]. He may have been the Nathaniel Morres who owed the Worcester County estate of Peter Beckett 12 shillings on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89]. He was taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1774. He was the father of 3 i. Levi1, born 17 January 1747/8. ii. Elizabeth3, born say 1752, married Thomas Clerk (Clark) ("Mustees, free"), 1 July 1773 in Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286]. 2. Elizabeth1 Morris, born about 1726, was a "Molatto Girle" aged twelve years old, bound until the age of twenty-one, and valued at 18 pounds in the 25 July 1738 Talbot County estate of John Vickers [Prerogative Court Inventories 1737-9, 23:488]. She may have been the mother of i. John, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. ii. Elizabeth2, born say 1750, presented by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1770 for having an illegitimate child by a "negro." She was sold for seven years and her daughter Jane, born 7 January 1770, was sold for thirty-one years to William Robinson for a total of 2,600 pounds of tobacco [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1770-1772, 5]. 3. Levi1 Morris, born 17 January 1747/8, married Sarah Hanzer, in September 1768 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. He was a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundreds, Sussex County, in 1787, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 5 in 1810 [DE:456]. The Sussex County court fined him six pence for assault in February 1773 [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 132]. He may have been the father of i. Nathaniel2, born say 1775, married Alice Handsor, "Two free Mulatoes," on 24 December 1799 in Sussex County, Delaware, and second, Sarah Cornish, "free Mulattoes," on 5 December 1802 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315, 318]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220]. ii. Nancy, married Abel Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310, 318]. iii. Levy2, born 1776-1794, married ___ Oakey in May 1805 and second, Eunice Johnson, "Mulattoes," on 19 December 1810 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 322]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:416] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. iv. Simon, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:308]. v. Isaac, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214]. vi. Minty, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Gabriel, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Worcester, Sussex
Family Name Morris
Family History Notes Mixed-race members of the Morris family in Maryland and Delaware may have been related to William Morris "Mallatto" of Accomack County, Virginia [Orders 1703-9, 38, 42a]. They were 1 i. Nathaniel, born say 1722. 2 ii. Elizabeth1, born about 1726. iii. Thomas, born say 1728, a "mulato" taxable in Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County in 1748 [List of Tithables, 1748]. 1. Nathaniel1 Morris, born in October 1720, orphan son of George Morris, was bound by the Somerset County court as an apprentice to James Longo to make linen and woolen wheels and chairs and to read and write on 17 June 1735 [Judicial Record 1735-7, 14]. He was taxable in the household of James Longo in Wicomoco Hundred, Somerset County, from 1736 to 1740. He was also listed in his own household with wife Eliza in 1740 [List of Tithables]. He registered the birth of his son, Levi, in St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Sussex County, Delaware, on 17 January 1747/8 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 93]. He may have been the Nathaniel Morres who owed the Worcester County estate of Peter Beckett 12 shillings on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89]. He was taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1774. He was the father of 3 i. Levi1, born 17 January 1747/8. ii. Elizabeth3, born say 1752, married Thomas Clerk (Clark) ("Mustees, free"), 1 July 1773 in Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286]. 2. Elizabeth1 Morris, born about 1726, was a "Molatto Girle" aged twelve years old, bound until the age of twenty-one, and valued at 18 pounds in the 25 July 1738 Talbot County estate of John Vickers [Prerogative Court Inventories 1737-9, 23:488]. She may have been the mother of i. John, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. ii. Elizabeth2, born say 1750, presented by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1770 for having an illegitimate child by a "negro." She was sold for seven years and her daughter Jane, born 7 January 1770, was sold for thirty-one years to William Robinson for a total of 2,600 pounds of tobacco [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1770-1772, 5]. 3. Levi1 Morris, born 17 January 1747/8, married Sarah Hanzer, in September 1768 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. He was a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundreds, Sussex County, in 1787, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 5 in 1810 [DE:456]. The Sussex County court fined him six pence for assault in February 1773 [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 132]. He may have been the father of i. Nathaniel2, born say 1775, married Alice Handsor, "Two free Mulatoes," on 24 December 1799 in Sussex County, Delaware, and second, Sarah Cornish, "free Mulattoes," on 5 December 1802 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315, 318]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220]. ii. Nancy, married Abel Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310, 318]. iii. Levy2, born 1776-1794, married ___ Oakey in May 1805 and second, Eunice Johnson, "Mulattoes," on 19 December 1810 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 322]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:416] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. iv. Simon, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:308]. v. Isaac, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214]. vi. Minty, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. vii. Gabriel, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830
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Family Name Mosely
Family History Notes Members of the Mosely family were 1 i. William, born say 1725. 2 ii. Absolem1, born say 1730. 1. William Mosely, born say 1725, a "mulatto," registered the birth of his daughter, Elizabeth, on 17 January 1747/8 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 93]. He was the father of 3 i. ?John, born say 1746. ii. Elizabeth, born 17 January 1747/8. 2. Absolem1 Mosely, born say 1730, was indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1749. He posted 50 pounds bond and John Corwill was surety for another 50 pounds. The case was dismissed in August 1750 on his committment to pay all fees [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frames 448, 453, 470]. He purchased 104 acres called Oliver's Folly on the north side of Sow Bridge Branch in Sussex County from William Winsley for 12 pounds, 10 shillings on 4 May 1765 [DB K-10:270]. He was taxable in Slaughter Creek, Sussex County in 1770 [RG 2535, reel 1]. He left a 25 April 1795 Sussex County will, proved 30 April 1795, by which he named his sons Purnell, Absolem, Curnell and other unnamed children [WB E:33-4]. His land was listed as half cleared and worth about 30 shillings per acre in the 1796 tax list for Cedar Creek Hundred [RG 2535, reel 2]. He was the father of i. Purnell, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:463] and 10 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:334]. He was an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" laborer living with John Mosely in the 1850 Dover Hundred census [DE:345]. ii. Absolem2, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. iii. ?Cornelius1, married Alce Hanzer, "Blacks, freed" 29 June 1779 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 294]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1779 to 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 407, 429, 430, 452], a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1790 [RG 2535, roll 2] and head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:414]. iv. ?George, a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1790 [RG 2535, roll 2]. 3. John1 Mosely, born say 1746, and his wife, Elizabeth, had their son, Billy, baptized on 9 September 1770 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 100]. He purchased 50 acres in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, on the southwest side of the Raccoon Swamp that empties into the Nanticoke River for 50 pounds on 7 August 1786 [DB N-13:299]. He was taxable in Dagsborough Hundred in 1784 and in Nanticoke Hundred from 1789 to 1796 when he was listed as a "Molatto" [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2]. He was head of a Nanticoke Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342], 8 in 1810 [DE:462], and 5 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:330]. They were the parents of i. William2, born 1 October 17__, baptized 9 September 1770. ii. ?Solomon1, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1768 to 1772 when he was delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 23, 75, 119, 148], called "Solmon Mosely the elder," a yeoman of Kent County, in November 1772 when the grand jury indicted him for stealing two bushels of wheat from Risdon Bishop of Little Creek Hundred [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files November 1772 indictments]. He was head of a Cedar Creek, Sussex County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:307]. iii. ?Jacob, head of an Octararo, Cecil County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790. vi. ?John2, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 6 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:334]. Other members of the family in Delaware were i. Solomon2, born before 1776, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. ii. Emeline, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:445]. iii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:334]. iv. Hezekiah, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:410]. v. Cornelius2, born 1776-1794, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:6]. vi. John3, born 1776-1794, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:334]. vii. Isaac, head of an Appoquinimink Hundred, New Castle County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:156].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties New Castle
Family Name Mosely
Family History Notes Members of the Mosely family were 1 i. William, born say 1725. 2 ii. Absolem1, born say 1730. 1. William Mosely, born say 1725, a "mulatto," registered the birth of his daughter, Elizabeth, on 17 January 1747/8 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 93]. He was the father of 3 i. ?John, born say 1746. ii. Elizabeth, born 17 January 1747/8. 2. Absolem1 Mosely, born say 1730, was indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1749. He posted 50 pounds bond and John Corwill was surety for another 50 pounds. The case was dismissed in August 1750 on his committment to pay all fees [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frames 448, 453, 470]. He purchased 104 acres called Oliver's Folly on the north side of Sow Bridge Branch in Sussex County from William Winsley for 12 pounds, 10 shillings on 4 May 1765 [DB K-10:270]. He was taxable in Slaughter Creek, Sussex County in 1770 [RG 2535, reel 1]. He left a 25 April 1795 Sussex County will, proved 30 April 1795, by which he named his sons Purnell, Absolem, Curnell and other unnamed children [WB E:33-4]. His land was listed as half cleared and worth about 30 shillings per acre in the 1796 tax list for Cedar Creek Hundred [RG 2535, reel 2]. He was the father of i. Purnell, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:463] and 10 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:334]. He was an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" laborer living with John Mosely in the 1850 Dover Hundred census [DE:345]. ii. Absolem2, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. iii. ?Cornelius1, married Alce Hanzer, "Blacks, freed" 29 June 1779 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 294]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1779 to 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 407, 429, 430, 452], a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1790 [RG 2535, roll 2] and head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:414]. iv. ?George, a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1790 [RG 2535, roll 2]. 3. John1 Mosely, born say 1746, and his wife, Elizabeth, had their son, Billy, baptized on 9 September 1770 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 100]. He purchased 50 acres in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, on the southwest side of the Raccoon Swamp that empties into the Nanticoke River for 50 pounds on 7 August 1786 [DB N-13:299]. He was taxable in Dagsborough Hundred in 1784 and in Nanticoke Hundred from 1789 to 1796 when he was listed as a "Molatto" [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2]. He was head of a Nanticoke Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342], 8 in 1810 [DE:462], and 5 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:330]. They were the parents of i. William2, born 1 October 17__, baptized 9 September 1770. ii. ?Solomon1, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1768 to 1772 when he was delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 23, 75, 119, 148], called "Solmon Mosely the elder," a yeoman of Kent County, in November 1772 when the grand jury indicted him for stealing two bushels of wheat from Risdon Bishop of Little Creek Hundred [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files November 1772 indictments]. He was head of a Cedar Creek, Sussex County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:307]. iii. ?Jacob, head of an Octararo, Cecil County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790. vi. ?John2, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 6 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:334]. Other members of the family in Delaware were i. Solomon2, born before 1776, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. ii. Emeline, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:445]. iii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:334]. iv. Hezekiah, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:410]. v. Cornelius2, born 1776-1794, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:6]. vi. John3, born 1776-1794, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:334]. vii. Isaac, head of an Appoquinimink Hundred, New Castle County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:156].
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Family Name Norwood
Family History Notes Members of the Norwood family in Delaware were 1 i. Nathaniel1, born about 1735. ii. Daniel1, born about 1739, a nineteen-year-old farmer born in Angola Hundred (no race or complexion indicated) who enlisted in the French and Indian War on 19 April 1758 and was listed in the 17 May 1758 muster of Captain McClughan's company for the campaign in the Lower Counties [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He pled guilty and was fined 5 shillings for trespass in Sussex County court in May 1758. He confessed judgment of 6 pounds, 19 shillings to Jacob Kollock, Esq., in April 1764. He was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred in 1773 and 1774 [Delaware State Archives, RG 2535, reel 1]. The State charged him with felony in May 1786 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frame 423; 1761-71, frame 154; 1771-93, 385, 391, 404]. 1. Nathaniel1 Norwood, born about 1735, was a twenty-three year-old nineteen planter born in Indian River Hundred (no race or complexion indicated) who enlisted in the French and Indian War on 19 April 1758 and was listed in the 17 May 1758 muster of Captain McClughan's company for the campaign in the Lower Counties [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-4]. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for trespass in May 1758 for which he submitted to the mercy of the court. In February 1759 he was adjudged to serve the estate of Joseph Warrington, deceased, at the rate of 30 shillings per month to pay off his debts [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frame 423; 1761-71, frame 319]. He and his wife, Jemimy, registered the 17 June 1769 birth of their "Melatto" son, Bowen, and their son Nathan at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 99, 103]. Nathan was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1774 to 1784 [Delaware State Archives RG 2535, reels 1&2]. Administration on his Sussex County estate was granted to (his wife) Jemima Norwood on 10 March 1786 [de Valinger, Calendar of Sussex County Probate Records, 173; A 91:116]. Nathaniel and Jemima were the parents of 2 i. ?Eli, born say 1768. ii. Bowan, born 17 June 1769 (perhaps identical to Eli Norwood). 3 iii. ?Noble, born say 1775. iv. Nathan2, born 15 February 1777, baptized 27 September 1777 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1797 to 1801 [Delaware State Archives, RG 4200.027, reel 2, frames 176, 258]. v. ?John1, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:354], 2. Eli1 Norwood, born say 1768, married Anna Rust on 4 December 1789 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 304]. Anna was probably related to George Rust, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:388]. Eli was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1789, 1790 and 1796 [Delaware State Archives RG 2535, reel 2; RG 4200.027, reel 2, frame 115], head of a Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 (Eli Nord) [DE:437] and head of a Sussex County household 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:412]. On 13 March 1819 he and his wife Elon made a Sussex County deed for a half acre to the trustees of Harmony Meeting House: Purnall Johnson, Burton Johnson, William Hayes, John Cornish and Mitchell Johnson, for the building of a house of worship for the use of the members of the Methodist Episcopal Church [DB 45:124]. He left a 2 January 1838 Sussex County will, proved 23 May 1838, witnessed by Whittington Johnson, naming his widow Elon and seven children: Eli, Stephen M., William D., Wingate P., Samuel B, Mary Jane N., and Ann Johnson, wife of Whittington. He was the father of i. John2, born 1 January 1794, son of Eli and Anna Norwood, baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 111]. 3. Noble Norwood, born say 1775, was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, in 1796 and 1801 [Delaware State Archives, RG 4200.027, reel 2, frames 115, 258] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437] and 10 in 1810 [DE:405]. Noble and Lydia Norwood were the parents of i. Polly, "free Mulatto," daughter of Noble and Lydia Norwood, baptized at Indian River, Sussex County, on 12 February 1797. ii. Betsey, "free Mulatto," daughter of Noble and Lydia Norwood, baptized at Indian River, Sussex County, on 17 August 1799 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 391, 399].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties
Family Name Norwood
Family History Notes Members of the Norwood family in Delaware were 1 i. Nathaniel1, born about 1735. ii. Daniel1, born about 1739, a nineteen-year-old farmer born in Angola Hundred (no race or complexion indicated) who enlisted in the French and Indian War on 19 April 1758 and was listed in the 17 May 1758 muster of Captain McClughan's company for the campaign in the Lower Counties [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He pled guilty and was fined 5 shillings for trespass in Sussex County court in May 1758. He confessed judgment of 6 pounds, 19 shillings to Jacob Kollock, Esq., in April 1764. He was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred in 1773 and 1774 [Delaware State Archives, RG 2535, reel 1]. The State charged him with felony in May 1786 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frame 423; 1761-71, frame 154; 1771-93, 385, 391, 404]. 1. Nathaniel1 Norwood, born about 1735, was a twenty-three year-old nineteen planter born in Indian River Hundred (no race or complexion indicated) who enlisted in the French and Indian War on 19 April 1758 and was listed in the 17 May 1758 muster of Captain McClughan's company for the campaign in the Lower Counties [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-4]. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for trespass in May 1758 for which he submitted to the mercy of the court. In February 1759 he was adjudged to serve the estate of Joseph Warrington, deceased, at the rate of 30 shillings per month to pay off his debts [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frame 423; 1761-71, frame 319]. He and his wife, Jemimy, registered the 17 June 1769 birth of their "Melatto" son, Bowen, and their son Nathan at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 99, 103]. Nathan was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1774 to 1784 [Delaware State Archives RG 2535, reels 1&2]. Administration on his Sussex County estate was granted to (his wife) Jemima Norwood on 10 March 1786 [de Valinger, Calendar of Sussex County Probate Records, 173; A 91:116]. Nathaniel and Jemima were the parents of 2 i. ?Eli, born say 1768. ii. Bowan, born 17 June 1769 (perhaps identical to Eli Norwood). 3 iii. ?Noble, born say 1775. iv. Nathan2, born 15 February 1777, baptized 27 September 1777 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1797 to 1801 [Delaware State Archives, RG 4200.027, reel 2, frames 176, 258]. v. ?John1, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:354], 2. Eli1 Norwood, born say 1768, married Anna Rust on 4 December 1789 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 304]. Anna was probably related to George Rust, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:388]. Eli was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1789, 1790 and 1796 [Delaware State Archives RG 2535, reel 2; RG 4200.027, reel 2, frame 115], head of a Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 (Eli Nord) [DE:437] and head of a Sussex County household 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:412]. On 13 March 1819 he and his wife Elon made a Sussex County deed for a half acre to the trustees of Harmony Meeting House: Purnall Johnson, Burton Johnson, William Hayes, John Cornish and Mitchell Johnson, for the building of a house of worship for the use of the members of the Methodist Episcopal Church [DB 45:124]. He left a 2 January 1838 Sussex County will, proved 23 May 1838, witnessed by Whittington Johnson, naming his widow Elon and seven children: Eli, Stephen M., William D., Wingate P., Samuel B, Mary Jane N., and Ann Johnson, wife of Whittington. He was the father of i. John2, born 1 January 1794, son of Eli and Anna Norwood, baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 111]. 3. Noble Norwood, born say 1775, was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, in 1796 and 1801 [Delaware State Archives, RG 4200.027, reel 2, frames 115, 258] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437] and 10 in 1810 [DE:405]. Noble and Lydia Norwood were the parents of i. Polly, "free Mulatto," daughter of Noble and Lydia Norwood, baptized at Indian River, Sussex County, on 12 February 1797. ii. Betsey, "free Mulatto," daughter of Noble and Lydia Norwood, baptized at Indian River, Sussex County, on 17 August 1799 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 391, 399].
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Family Name Nutt/Nutts
Family History Notes 1. Jane Nutt, born say 1700, was living at the house of Joseph Venable in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, in June 1721 when she was confessed that she had a "Mulatto" child in the month of January 1719/20. The court ordered her sold for seven years [Judicial Record 1719-22, 82, 100]. She may have been the ancestor of the members of the Nutts family in Accomack and Northampton counties: i. William, born say 1750, an Indian living in Accomack County on 25 October 1774 when he and Nathan Addison's slave Jacob were charged with felony [Orders 1774-7, 270, 277]. ii. Daniel, born December 1760, a four-year-old "Mulattoe" bound to Major Joyne by the Northampton County, Virginia court on 11 September 1765 [Minutes 1765-71, 11]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:45]. iii. Edmund, born Christmas 1774, bound by the Northampton County court to Margaret Addison on 12 February 1782 [Minutes 1777-83, 336]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 251, 270, 312, 353]. He married Mary Bibbins, 18 June 1800 Northampton County bond, Southy Collins security, consent of Nanny Bibbins. He was head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:45]. He was called an Indian when his wife Mary was counted as a "free negro" in Accomack County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 833]. iv. Thomas, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:158]. v. Bridget, married Toby Stephens, 7 September 1804 Northampton County bond, Ben Dunton security. vi. Sabra, married Isaac Stephens, 16 August 1809 Northampton County bond, Isaac Stevens, Sr., security. vii. Ariena, born say 1779, married Peter Beckett, 10 January 1800 Accomack County bond, Babel Major, surety. Babel Major was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:43]. Ariena may have been the Arena Becket who married Thomas Bibbins, 2 August 1800 Accomack County bond, Peter Bibbins surety.
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Accomack, Northampton
Family Name Nutt/Nutts
Family History Notes 1. Jane Nutt, born say 1700, was living at the house of Joseph Venable in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, in June 1721 when she was confessed that she had a "Mulatto" child in the month of January 1719/20. The court ordered her sold for seven years [Judicial Record 1719-22, 82, 100]. She may have been the ancestor of the members of the Nutts family in Accomack and Northampton counties: i. William, born say 1750, an Indian living in Accomack County on 25 October 1774 when he and Nathan Addison's slave Jacob were charged with felony [Orders 1774-7, 270, 277]. ii. Daniel, born December 1760, a four-year-old "Mulattoe" bound to Major Joyne by the Northampton County, Virginia court on 11 September 1765 [Minutes 1765-71, 11]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:45]. iii. Edmund, born Christmas 1774, bound by the Northampton County court to Margaret Addison on 12 February 1782 [Minutes 1777-83, 336]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 251, 270, 312, 353]. He married Mary Bibbins, 18 June 1800 Northampton County bond, Southy Collins security, consent of Nanny Bibbins. He was head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:45]. He was called an Indian when his wife Mary was counted as a "free negro" in Accomack County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 833]. iv. Thomas, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:158]. v. Bridget, married Toby Stephens, 7 September 1804 Northampton County bond, Ben Dunton security. vi. Sabra, married Isaac Stephens, 16 August 1809 Northampton County bond, Isaac Stevens, Sr., security. vii. Ariena, born say 1779, married Peter Beckett, 10 January 1800 Accomack County bond, Babel Major, surety. Babel Major was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:43]. Ariena may have been the Arena Becket who married Thomas Bibbins, 2 August 1800 Accomack County bond, Peter Bibbins surety.
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Family Name Okey
Family History Notes The Okey family probably has some connection to John Okey and his wife Mary Vincent, early residents of Sussex County, Delaware. Before marrying John Okey, Mary had a mixed-race son (Aminadab Hanser) by a slave in Accomack County, Virginia [see the Hanser history]. It appears that there was another member of the Okey family who was named Aminadab, and he was probably mixed-race as well. However, his origin has not yet been identified. Perhaps he was another mixed-race child of Mary Okey. John Okey owned 400 acres in Sussex County called "Mollattoe Hall" in 1686 [DB A:31, 49; Horle, Records of Sussex County, 412-3]. 1. Aminadab Okey, born say 1680, may have been the "strang Child ... which is not Certainly known Whose it is" who was living at John Okey's house in March 1682 when the Sussex County court bound him to Henry Bowman. Aminadab Okey was sued by Aminadab Hanser in Sussex County court on 3 May 1704 [Horle, Records of Sussex County, 155, 1191]. He and Aminadab Hanser were apparently neighbors because on 9 April 1713 he was required to give 100 pounds security to Aminadab Handsor in Sussex County court to guarantee that he would abide by the arbitrators' decision regarding the removal of a fence [DB D-4:225-6]. And Aminadab Hanser's wife Rose mentioned Aminadab Okey's land adjoining hers in her 8 December 1725 deed of sale [DB F-6:220-2]. Aminadab Okey died before 1734 when the account of his estate was recorded in Sussex County court. The account totalled 44 pounds and included 22 pounds for the sale of land [Orphans Court 1728-44, 65a]. He was most likely the ancestor of 2 i. Robert1, born say 1698. 3 ii. Joseph, born say 1725. iii.Thomas, born say 1726, recorded his ear mark in Sussex County court on 18 November 1747 [Q-16:301]. He submitted to the Sussex County court on the charge of assault and paid a 2 shilling fine in November 1754 [RG 4815.017, 1753-1760, frame 118]. He died before 4 February 1784 when is widow Elizabeth sold half of 106 acres in the forest of Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, which she had purchased on 3 May 1780. She sold the remainder on 10 January 1793 [DB N-13:254, 511]. iv. Alexander1, born say 1732, charged with grand larceny in Sussex County court in May 1754 [RG 4815.017, 1753-60, p.134, frame 71]. 4 v. Saunders2, born say 1750. vi. Sinai, made to post security in Sussex County court in November 1784 to keep the peace. William Jackson and Cornelius Molsely were securities [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frame 349]. vii. Robert2, born say 1746, was sued by Jesse Mackemmy in Sussex County court in May 1768 and agreed with the plaintiff in May 1769. He sued Alexander Stockley in August 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frames 417, 435, 509, 555]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1774. He was called a tanner on 2 February 1789 when he and Jennett Okey, spinster, purchased as tenants-in-common four acres in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on the edge of the Rehoboth Road [DB O-14:161]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 11 in 1810 [DE:462]. viii. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1757, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1774. ix. Jonathan1, born say 1757, perhaps the John Okey, Jr., who was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundrds in 1774. Jonathan was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:41]. 5 x. William1, born say 1763. xi. Jonathan2, head of a Saint Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:416]. xii. Robert3, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40] and 9 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:468]. xiii. Robert4, born 1776-1794, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:415] and 8 "free colored" in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:306]. xiv. William2, born 1776-1794, head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306]. xv. Levin, taxable in Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, in 1784. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for petit larceny in November 1783 with Elizabeth Oaky as his security [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frame 321]. He purchased 6-1/2 acres in Broadkiln Hundred at the sheriff's sale for 15 pounds, made additions to the dwelling, added other buildings and improvements and sold it about two years later about 1789 for 40 pounds [DB O-14:154, 622]. xvi. Betty Okey, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:117]. 2. Robert1 Okey, born say 1698, was living on 111 acres of land adjoining Samuel and Ann Hanser on 20 May 1733 when they sold 124 acres near Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County. He was mentioned in the 11 June 1742 Sussex County, Delaware deed of his son Samuel who sold land which had formerly belonged to Aminadab Okey and Robert Okey [DB G-7:34-5; H-8:14]. He died before 3 September 1745 when his daughter Sabria and her husband John Parsons petitioned the Sussex County court to divide his land among his heirs [Orphans Court 1744-51, 17]. He was the father of i. Samuel, born say 1719, called son of Robert Okey on 11 June 1742 when he sold 60 acres in Sussex County which was formerly owned by Robert and Aminadab Okey and by Aminadab Hanzor before them [DB H-8:14]. He was sued by William Taft in Sussex County court in November 1742, but the case was settled out of court, and he sued David McCracken in court in November 1762 but withdrew the suit before it came to trial [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 45; 1761-71, 118]. He was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Cord Hazard, Jr., on 12 March 1750 [Orphans Court 1744-51, 80]. ii. Richard, born say 1721, called brother of Samuel Okey in Samuel's 11 June 1742 Sussex County deed by which Samuel sold land adjoining Richard's [DB H-8:14]. iii. Sabria, born say 1725, wife of John Parsons. 3. Joseph1 Okey, born say 1725, and Elizabeth Oakey sold 89 acres, part of Ebenezer to John Barker for 11 pounds, 10 shillings on 8 August 1744 [DB H-8:66]. He and his wife Arcada Okey were administrators of the Worcester County estate of her father Peter Beckett on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 48:98-100; 60:89; Accounts 37:65]. He purchased 212 acres in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on Indian River Branch from the sheriff on 5 August 1762 [DB I-9:390]. He sued James Pettyjohn in Sussex County court for assault in February 1759 but he discontinued the suit in February 1760 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 510, 526, 585]. He was a "Molatto" taxable in William Burford's District, Granville County, North Carolina, in 1765. He was taxable on two tithes in 1769 and 1771 and was taxed on an assessment of 329 pounds in Nap of Reeds District, Granville County, in 1780. In 1786 he was called Joseph Oakey, Sr., in Nap of Reeds District of Granville County when he was head of a household of 2 "white" men over 60 or under 21 years and 4 "white" women in the state census. He was taxable on 250 acres from 1786 to 1804 and taxable on one poll in 1786 but not free from poll tax by 1790. He was called Joseph Oakley in 1800 when he was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free." Perhaps his widow was Sarah Oakey who was taxable on 50 acres in Ledge of Rock District, Granville County, from 1805 to 1808 [Tax List 1803-1811, 142, 199, 212, 268]. Joseph was probably the father of 6 i. Joseph2, Jr., born say 1750. ii. Micajah, head of a household of 1 "white" male under twenty-one years of age and 2 "white" females in Nap of Reeds District in the state census for Granville County in 1786. 4. Saunders Okey, born say 1742, was sued for debt by Robert and Mary Jackson in Sussex County court but the case was agreed to before coming to trial [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 106]. Saunders and his wife, Mary, "melattoes," registered the 20 October 1771 birth of their daughter, Rhoda, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth, Sussex County in 1774 and a delinquent taxable in 1787. He married, second, Johannah Hansor, widow of Nehemiah Hansor by 12 November 1787 when they were summoned to court to give an account of Nehemiah's estate [de Valinger, Court Records of Kent County, Delaware, 1680-1705, 89]. He was the father of i. Rhoda, born 20 October 1771. ii. ?Lina, married Shepherd Harmon on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware. iii. ?Nancy, married Peter Pride on 12 February 1803 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318, 319]. 5. William1 Oakey, born say 1763, and his wife Sarah registered the 5 April 1785 birth of their daughter Polley at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1784 to 1790. William and Sarah were the parents of i. Polly, born 5 April 1785, baptized 5 October 1785. 6. Joseph2 Okey, born say 1750, was taxable on an assessment of 1,810 pounds in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1780. He was called Joseph Oakey, Jr. in 1790 when he was taxable in Dutch District, Granville County and called "Joseph Oakley, Jr." in 1800 when he was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free." He was taxable on 447 acres in Dutch District, Granville County from 1786 to 1796 and taxable on 250 acres in Ledge of Rock District, Granville County from 1802 to 1804. His 8 August 1804 Granville County will was proved by his wife Elizabeth in August 1805. He (signing) left 100 acres to his son Aaron, 150 acres to his son Willie and daughter Selah, and named his other children: Joseph, Susanna, Elizabeth, and Deborah [Original at N.C. Archives, CR.044.801.29]. His widow Elizabeth Okey was taxable on 250 acres in Ledge of Rock District in 1805 [Tax List 1796-1802, p.283; 1803-1811, 89, 142, 199, 212], and head of a Ledge Neck, Granville County household of 3 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:18]. They were the parents of i. Aaron. ii. Selah. iii. William4/ Willie. iv. Joseph3. v. Susanna. vi. Elizabeth. vii. Deborah.
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties
Family Name Okey
Family History Notes The Okey family probably has some connection to John Okey and his wife Mary Vincent, early residents of Sussex County, Delaware. Before marrying John Okey, Mary had a mixed-race son (Aminadab Hanser) by a slave in Accomack County, Virginia [see the Hanser history]. It appears that there was another member of the Okey family who was named Aminadab, and he was probably mixed-race as well. However, his origin has not yet been identified. Perhaps he was another mixed-race child of Mary Okey. John Okey owned 400 acres in Sussex County called "Mollattoe Hall" in 1686 [DB A:31, 49; Horle, Records of Sussex County, 412-3]. 1. Aminadab Okey, born say 1680, may have been the "strang Child ... which is not Certainly known Whose it is" who was living at John Okey's house in March 1682 when the Sussex County court bound him to Henry Bowman. Aminadab Okey was sued by Aminadab Hanser in Sussex County court on 3 May 1704 [Horle, Records of Sussex County, 155, 1191]. He and Aminadab Hanser were apparently neighbors because on 9 April 1713 he was required to give 100 pounds security to Aminadab Handsor in Sussex County court to guarantee that he would abide by the arbitrators' decision regarding the removal of a fence [DB D-4:225-6]. And Aminadab Hanser's wife Rose mentioned Aminadab Okey's land adjoining hers in her 8 December 1725 deed of sale [DB F-6:220-2]. Aminadab Okey died before 1734 when the account of his estate was recorded in Sussex County court. The account totalled 44 pounds and included 22 pounds for the sale of land [Orphans Court 1728-44, 65a]. He was most likely the ancestor of 2 i. Robert1, born say 1698. 3 ii. Joseph, born say 1725. iii.Thomas, born say 1726, recorded his ear mark in Sussex County court on 18 November 1747 [Q-16:301]. He submitted to the Sussex County court on the charge of assault and paid a 2 shilling fine in November 1754 [RG 4815.017, 1753-1760, frame 118]. He died before 4 February 1784 when is widow Elizabeth sold half of 106 acres in the forest of Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, which she had purchased on 3 May 1780. She sold the remainder on 10 January 1793 [DB N-13:254, 511]. iv. Alexander1, born say 1732, charged with grand larceny in Sussex County court in May 1754 [RG 4815.017, 1753-60, p.134, frame 71]. 4 v. Saunders2, born say 1750. vi. Sinai, made to post security in Sussex County court in November 1784 to keep the peace. William Jackson and Cornelius Molsely were securities [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frame 349]. vii. Robert2, born say 1746, was sued by Jesse Mackemmy in Sussex County court in May 1768 and agreed with the plaintiff in May 1769. He sued Alexander Stockley in August 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frames 417, 435, 509, 555]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1774. He was called a tanner on 2 February 1789 when he and Jennett Okey, spinster, purchased as tenants-in-common four acres in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on the edge of the Rehoboth Road [DB O-14:161]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 11 in 1810 [DE:462]. viii. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1757, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1774. ix. Jonathan1, born say 1757, perhaps the John Okey, Jr., who was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundrds in 1774. Jonathan was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:41]. 5 x. William1, born say 1763. xi. Jonathan2, head of a Saint Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:416]. xii. Robert3, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40] and 9 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:468]. xiii. Robert4, born 1776-1794, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:415] and 8 "free colored" in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:306]. xiv. William2, born 1776-1794, head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306]. xv. Levin, taxable in Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, in 1784. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for petit larceny in November 1783 with Elizabeth Oaky as his security [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frame 321]. He purchased 6-1/2 acres in Broadkiln Hundred at the sheriff's sale for 15 pounds, made additions to the dwelling, added other buildings and improvements and sold it about two years later about 1789 for 40 pounds [DB O-14:154, 622]. xvi. Betty Okey, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:117]. 2. Robert1 Okey, born say 1698, was living on 111 acres of land adjoining Samuel and Ann Hanser on 20 May 1733 when they sold 124 acres near Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County. He was mentioned in the 11 June 1742 Sussex County, Delaware deed of his son Samuel who sold land which had formerly belonged to Aminadab Okey and Robert Okey [DB G-7:34-5; H-8:14]. He died before 3 September 1745 when his daughter Sabria and her husband John Parsons petitioned the Sussex County court to divide his land among his heirs [Orphans Court 1744-51, 17]. He was the father of i. Samuel, born say 1719, called son of Robert Okey on 11 June 1742 when he sold 60 acres in Sussex County which was formerly owned by Robert and Aminadab Okey and by Aminadab Hanzor before them [DB H-8:14]. He was sued by William Taft in Sussex County court in November 1742, but the case was settled out of court, and he sued David McCracken in court in November 1762 but withdrew the suit before it came to trial [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 45; 1761-71, 118]. He was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Cord Hazard, Jr., on 12 March 1750 [Orphans Court 1744-51, 80]. ii. Richard, born say 1721, called brother of Samuel Okey in Samuel's 11 June 1742 Sussex County deed by which Samuel sold land adjoining Richard's [DB H-8:14]. iii. Sabria, born say 1725, wife of John Parsons. 3. Joseph1 Okey, born say 1725, and Elizabeth Oakey sold 89 acres, part of Ebenezer to John Barker for 11 pounds, 10 shillings on 8 August 1744 [DB H-8:66]. He and his wife Arcada Okey were administrators of the Worcester County estate of her father Peter Beckett on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 48:98-100; 60:89; Accounts 37:65]. He purchased 212 acres in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on Indian River Branch from the sheriff on 5 August 1762 [DB I-9:390]. He sued James Pettyjohn in Sussex County court for assault in February 1759 but he discontinued the suit in February 1760 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 510, 526, 585]. He was a "Molatto" taxable in William Burford's District, Granville County, North Carolina, in 1765. He was taxable on two tithes in 1769 and 1771 and was taxed on an assessment of 329 pounds in Nap of Reeds District, Granville County, in 1780. In 1786 he was called Joseph Oakey, Sr., in Nap of Reeds District of Granville County when he was head of a household of 2 "white" men over 60 or under 21 years and 4 "white" women in the state census. He was taxable on 250 acres from 1786 to 1804 and taxable on one poll in 1786 but not free from poll tax by 1790. He was called Joseph Oakley in 1800 when he was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free." Perhaps his widow was Sarah Oakey who was taxable on 50 acres in Ledge of Rock District, Granville County, from 1805 to 1808 [Tax List 1803-1811, 142, 199, 212, 268]. Joseph was probably the father of 6 i. Joseph2, Jr., born say 1750. ii. Micajah, head of a household of 1 "white" male under twenty-one years of age and 2 "white" females in Nap of Reeds District in the state census for Granville County in 1786. 4. Saunders Okey, born say 1742, was sued for debt by Robert and Mary Jackson in Sussex County court but the case was agreed to before coming to trial [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 106]. Saunders and his wife, Mary, "melattoes," registered the 20 October 1771 birth of their daughter, Rhoda, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth, Sussex County in 1774 and a delinquent taxable in 1787. He married, second, Johannah Hansor, widow of Nehemiah Hansor by 12 November 1787 when they were summoned to court to give an account of Nehemiah's estate [de Valinger, Court Records of Kent County, Delaware, 1680-1705, 89]. He was the father of i. Rhoda, born 20 October 1771. ii. ?Lina, married Shepherd Harmon on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware. iii. ?Nancy, married Peter Pride on 12 February 1803 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318, 319]. 5. William1 Oakey, born say 1763, and his wife Sarah registered the 5 April 1785 birth of their daughter Polley at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1784 to 1790. William and Sarah were the parents of i. Polly, born 5 April 1785, baptized 5 October 1785. 6. Joseph2 Okey, born say 1750, was taxable on an assessment of 1,810 pounds in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1780. He was called Joseph Oakey, Jr. in 1790 when he was taxable in Dutch District, Granville County and called "Joseph Oakley, Jr." in 1800 when he was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free." He was taxable on 447 acres in Dutch District, Granville County from 1786 to 1796 and taxable on 250 acres in Ledge of Rock District, Granville County from 1802 to 1804. His 8 August 1804 Granville County will was proved by his wife Elizabeth in August 1805. He (signing) left 100 acres to his son Aaron, 150 acres to his son Willie and daughter Selah, and named his other children: Joseph, Susanna, Elizabeth, and Deborah [Original at N.C. Archives, CR.044.801.29]. His widow Elizabeth Okey was taxable on 250 acres in Ledge of Rock District in 1805 [Tax List 1796-1802, p.283; 1803-1811, 89, 142, 199, 212], and head of a Ledge Neck, Granville County household of 3 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:18]. They were the parents of i. Aaron. ii. Selah. iii. William4/ Willie. iv. Joseph3. v. Susanna. vi. Elizabeth. vii. Deborah.
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Family Name Oney
Family History Notes 1. Eleanor Oney, born say 1730, a "Negro," was living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, on 18 June 1751 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate child by "Negro Quamino," the slave of Henry Lewis. Thomas Moor was her security for payment of her fine. Her "Negro" daughter Levina Oney was bound to Thomas Moor by the court until the age of sixteen. She was convicted of having another illegitimate child on or about 1 February 1762 on the evidence of Thomas Dashiell. In August 1762 she was living in Stepney Parish when the court fined her 20 shillings for an assault on Elizabeth Hull on 22 July 1762 [Judicial Records 1749-51, 293-4; 1760-3, 145d, 151, 168]. She was the mother of i. Levina, born about 1750, a spinster living in Stepney Parish on 21 June 1768 when the court ordered her to pay a double fine when she refused to identify the father of her illegitimate child. Job Sirmon was her security [Judicial Records 1767-9, 149-150]. ii. ?Patience, born say 1752, a "Negro," of her own free will bound herself as an apprentice to Robert Brown until the age of sixteen in June 1762. On 18 November 1766 the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro" slave [Judicial Records 1760-3, 136; 1767-9, 36]. iii. ?Perlina, born say 1762, presented by the Somerset County court on 17 March 1772 for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Records 1769-72, 279]. They were apparently the ancestors of i. Daniel, head of a Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:244]. ii. Martin, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408]. iii. Horatio, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:394].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Somerset
Other Counties Sussex
Family Name Oney
Family History Notes 1. Eleanor Oney, born say 1730, a "Negro," was living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, on 18 June 1751 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate child by "Negro Quamino," the slave of Henry Lewis. Thomas Moor was her security for payment of her fine. Her "Negro" daughter Levina Oney was bound to Thomas Moor by the court until the age of sixteen. She was convicted of having another illegitimate child on or about 1 February 1762 on the evidence of Thomas Dashiell. In August 1762 she was living in Stepney Parish when the court fined her 20 shillings for an assault on Elizabeth Hull on 22 July 1762 [Judicial Records 1749-51, 293-4; 1760-3, 145d, 151, 168]. She was the mother of i. Levina, born about 1750, a spinster living in Stepney Parish on 21 June 1768 when the court ordered her to pay a double fine when she refused to identify the father of her illegitimate child. Job Sirmon was her security [Judicial Records 1767-9, 149-150]. ii. ?Patience, born say 1752, a "Negro," of her own free will bound herself as an apprentice to Robert Brown until the age of sixteen in June 1762. On 18 November 1766 the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro" slave [Judicial Records 1760-3, 136; 1767-9, 36]. iii. ?Perlina, born say 1762, presented by the Somerset County court on 17 March 1772 for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Records 1769-72, 279]. They were apparently the ancestors of i. Daniel, head of a Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:244]. ii. Martin, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408]. iii. Horatio, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:394].
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Family Name Parkinson
Family History Notes 1. Moses Parkinson, born say 1750, married Sally Cornish ("Molattoes") on 7 January 1771 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 282]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1774 [DSA, RG 2535]. He was called "Moses Parkinson of Indian River Hundred a free Mulatto" in 1791 when the State summoned him to court for "making shooting matches and selling Liquor in smaller measure than allowed by law" [DSA, RG 4805.021, 1755-1791, MS case files]. Moses and Sally were the parents of i. Moses Cornish, born 29 August 1777, "son of Moses and Sarah Parkeson," whose birth was registered at St. George Protestant Episcopal Church of Indian River Hundred [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103]. He was head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:326]. ii. ?Major, head of an Accomack County, Virginia household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:47]. iii. ?John, married Sally Handzor, "Mulattoes," on 19 December 1810 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 322].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties Accomack
Family Name Parkinson
Family History Notes 1. Moses Parkinson, born say 1750, married Sally Cornish ("Molattoes") on 7 January 1771 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 282]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1774 [DSA, RG 2535]. He was called "Moses Parkinson of Indian River Hundred a free Mulatto" in 1791 when the State summoned him to court for "making shooting matches and selling Liquor in smaller measure than allowed by law" [DSA, RG 4805.021, 1755-1791, MS case files]. Moses and Sally were the parents of i. Moses Cornish, born 29 August 1777, "son of Moses and Sarah Parkeson," whose birth was registered at St. George Protestant Episcopal Church of Indian River Hundred [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103]. He was head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:326]. ii. ?Major, head of an Accomack County, Virginia household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:47]. iii. ?John, married Sally Handzor, "Mulattoes," on 19 December 1810 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 322].
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Family Name Parsons
Family History Notes 1 i. John, born say 1722. ii. Catherine, born say 1724, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate child by an Indian named William Asquash. The court ordered that she receive ten lashes [Judgment Record 1745-6, 246-7]. (A William Asquash was one of the Choptank Indians who sold land in Dorchester County in 1727 [Land Records 1720-32, Liber old 8, 153]). 2 iii. Thomas, born say 1726. 1. John Parsons, born say 1722, married Sabria Okey, daughter of Robert Okey, before 3 September 1745 when they petitioned the Sussex County, Delaware Orphans Court to divide her father's land among his heirs [Orphans Court 1744-51, 17]. John was called a "mulatto" on 16 May 1747 when his daughter Ann was baptized on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County in 1774. He was the father of i. Ann, born 16 May 1747. 2. Thomas Parsons, born say 1726, a "mulatto," registered the 18 March 1749 birth of his son John at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. He was the father of i. John2, born 18 March 1749.
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties Dorchester
Family Name Parsons
Family History Notes 1 i. John, born say 1722. ii. Catherine, born say 1724, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate child by an Indian named William Asquash. The court ordered that she receive ten lashes [Judgment Record 1745-6, 246-7]. (A William Asquash was one of the Choptank Indians who sold land in Dorchester County in 1727 [Land Records 1720-32, Liber old 8, 153]). 2 iii. Thomas, born say 1726. 1. John Parsons, born say 1722, married Sabria Okey, daughter of Robert Okey, before 3 September 1745 when they petitioned the Sussex County, Delaware Orphans Court to divide her father's land among his heirs [Orphans Court 1744-51, 17]. John was called a "mulatto" on 16 May 1747 when his daughter Ann was baptized on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County in 1774. He was the father of i. Ann, born 16 May 1747. 2. Thomas Parsons, born say 1726, a "mulatto," registered the 18 March 1749 birth of his son John at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. He was the father of i. John2, born 18 March 1749.
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Family Name Peck
Family History Notes 1. Mary Peck, born about 1712, was a spinster white servant of Solomon Horney in March 1758 when she acknowledged in Talbot County court that she had a child by a "Negro." The court ordered her to serve her master another twelve months for his damages and then be sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1755-61, 161]. She was about fifty years old and still had four years to serve on 10 November 1762 when she was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Solomon Horney [Prerogative Inventories 79:453]. She was the mother of 2 i. Frances, born say 1738. 3 ii. Simon, born say 1750. iii. Patrick, born about 1757, a five-year-old "Mulatto" boy with twenty-six years to serve when he was listed in the 10 November 1762 Talbot County estate of Solomon Horney [Prerogative Inventories 79:453]. 2. Frances Peck, born say 1738, won her freedom in Talbot County in 1769 by proving that her mother was a white woman. She was probably identical to Frank Peck who was head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, Fanny Peck who was head of a Baltimore City household of 12 "other free" in 1800 [MD:332], and F. Peck, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:77]. She may have been the mother of i. David3, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521]. 3. Simon Peck, born say 1750, was head of a Talbot County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:519]. He may have been the father of i. Louranah, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 24 June 1815: a dark mulatto Woman .. about 33 yrs. of age ... born free and raised in the County. ii. Henry, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 September 1815: a bright mulatto man about 28 years of age. iii. Charles, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 23 September 1815: a bright Mulatto man ... about 25 years of age ... born free & raised in the County. iv. George, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 July 1815: a Black man about five feet Seven Inches high about 21 years of age ... born and raised in the County afsd. and is free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 41, 49; 1815-28, 3].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties
Family Name Peck
Family History Notes 1. Mary Peck, born about 1712, was a spinster white servant of Solomon Horney in March 1758 when she acknowledged in Talbot County court that she had a child by a "Negro." The court ordered her to serve her master another twelve months for his damages and then be sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1755-61, 161]. She was about fifty years old and still had four years to serve on 10 November 1762 when she was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Solomon Horney [Prerogative Inventories 79:453]. She was the mother of 2 i. Frances, born say 1738. 3 ii. Simon, born say 1750. iii. Patrick, born about 1757, a five-year-old "Mulatto" boy with twenty-six years to serve when he was listed in the 10 November 1762 Talbot County estate of Solomon Horney [Prerogative Inventories 79:453]. 2. Frances Peck, born say 1738, won her freedom in Talbot County in 1769 by proving that her mother was a white woman. She was probably identical to Frank Peck who was head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, Fanny Peck who was head of a Baltimore City household of 12 "other free" in 1800 [MD:332], and F. Peck, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:77]. She may have been the mother of i. David3, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521]. 3. Simon Peck, born say 1750, was head of a Talbot County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:519]. He may have been the father of i. Louranah, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 24 June 1815: a dark mulatto Woman .. about 33 yrs. of age ... born free and raised in the County. ii. Henry, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 September 1815: a bright mulatto man about 28 years of age. iii. Charles, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 23 September 1815: a bright Mulatto man ... about 25 years of age ... born free & raised in the County. iv. George, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 July 1815: a Black man about five feet Seven Inches high about 21 years of age ... born and raised in the County afsd. and is free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 41, 49; 1815-28, 3].
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Family Name Pennington
Family History Notes i. Mahala, born say 1780, mother of Kitty Danby who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 8 September 1829: bright yellow ... born free in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Mahala Pennington who was also born free about 29 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 64]. Kitty Danby was probably related to Mary Dansby, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:530] and Andrew Danberry, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:510]. ii. James, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790, 4 "other free" and 1 white woman 26-46 years old in 1800 [MD:522], 5 "other free" in New Castle County, Delaware, in 1810, and 8 "free colored" in Red Lion Hundred, New Castle County, in 1820 [DE:168]. iii. Philip, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:303].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Dorchester
Other Counties New Castle
Family Name Pennington
Family History Notes i. Mahala, born say 1780, mother of Kitty Danby who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 8 September 1829: bright yellow ... born free in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Mahala Pennington who was also born free about 29 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 64]. Kitty Danby was probably related to Mary Dansby, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:530] and Andrew Danberry, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:510]. ii. James, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790, 4 "other free" and 1 white woman 26-46 years old in 1800 [MD:522], 5 "other free" in New Castle County, Delaware, in 1810, and 8 "free colored" in Red Lion Hundred, New Castle County, in 1820 [DE:168]. iii. Philip, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:303].
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Family Name Perkins
Family History Notes The Perkins family originated in Accomack County, Virginia, where Esther Perkins had several mixed-race children in the 1730s. Her descendants were in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Louisiana before 1810. Her likely descendants in Maryland and Delaware were i. Caleb, perhaps the Caleb Perkins who was sued by James Fisher in Sussex County court in May 1742 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 75], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1785 to 1789 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1784-97], a delinquent taxable in Broadkill and Little Creek Hundreds, Sussex County, in 1790 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2], a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, and head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:18]. ii.Luke, taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County in 1790 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2].. iii. William, indicted in Sussex County court on an unspecified charge in February 1747/8 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 330], a taxable "Molatto" in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County on a cow and calf and 3 shoats in 1796. He was head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:343] and 6 in 1810 [DE:300]. Another William Perkins was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363]. iv. James, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:101] and 8 in 1810 [DE:363]. v. Aaron, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. vi. Peter, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363]. vii. Adam, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:62]. 1 viii. Frank, born say 1760. ix. Sampson, a "Molatto" taxable in Pitts Creek, Worcester County in 1783 [MdHR, MSA S1161-11-9, p.4]. 1. Frank Perkins, born say 1760, was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:514]. He was the father of i. James, born about March 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 4 August 1810: aged about 21 years last March, a light mulatto, 5' 3 3/4 inches high ... son of a free white woman who is lawfully married to a free mulatto man, and was raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 92].
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State Delaware
County (Primary) Sussex
Other Counties Worcester, Talbot, Accomack
Family Name Perkins
Family History Notes The Perkins family originated in Accomack County, Virginia, where Esther Perkins had several mixed-race children in the 1730s. Her descendants were in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Louisiana before 1810. Her likely descendants in Maryland and Delaware were i. Caleb, perhaps the Caleb Perkins who was sued by James Fisher in Sussex County court in May 1742 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 75], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1785 to 1789 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1784-97], a delinquent taxable in Broadkill and Little Creek Hundreds, Sussex County, in 1790 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2], a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, and head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:18]. ii.Luke, taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County in 1790 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2].. iii. William, indicted in Sussex County court on an unspecified charge in February 1747/8 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 330], a taxable "Molatto" in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County on a cow and calf and 3 shoats in 1796. He was head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:343] and 6 in 1810 [DE:300]. Another William Perkins was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363]. iv. James, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:101] and 8 in 1810 [DE:363]. v. Aaron, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. vi. Peter, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363]. vii. Adam, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:62]. 1 viii. Frank, born say 1760. ix. Sampson, a "Molatto" taxable in Pitts Creek, Worcester County in 1783 [MdHR, MSA S1161-11-9, p.4]. 1. Frank Perkins, born say 1760, was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:514]. He was the father of i. James, born about March 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 4 August 1810: aged about 21 years last March, a light mulatto, 5' 3 3/4 inches high ... son of a free white woman who is lawfully married to a free mulatto man, and was raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 92].
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Family Name Phillips
Family History Notes 1. Elizabeth Phillips, born say 1700, was the servant of Eliza Stevens of Saint Peter's Parish in March 1720 when the Talbot County court ordered that she serve her mistress an additional year for stealing petticoats and a bonnet from her mistress. In March 1724/5 she confessed to the court that she had an illegitimate child by "Negroe Will, the slave of Elizabeth Phillips." The court ordered that she be sold as a servant for seven years. She confessed to having another child by William in March 1725/6. She was the servant of William Stevens in November 1731 when she was convicted of fornication and given thirty lashes [Judgment Record 1720, 14; 1725-6, 64-5; 485-6; 1731-3, 463]. Elizabeth may have been the ancestor of 2 i. Jane, born say 1748. 3 ii. Richard, born say 1760. iii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. iv. Henry, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:165] and 6 in 1810 (H. Phillips) [MD:871]. v. Robert, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:845]. 2. Jane Phillips, born say 1748, was the servant of Moses Alford in August 1767 when she was convicted by the Kent County court of having a "Molatto" child. The court sold her son Anthony Phillips until the age of thirty one to her master for 5 shillings [Criminal Docket 1766-71, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. Antony, head of a Harford County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:800]. 3. Richard Phillips, born say 1760, was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 13 in 1800 [MD:471], and 8 in 1810 [MD:178]. He was probably the father of i. Daniel, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 31 October 1809: yellow complexion, free born and raised in the said county [Certificates of Freedom, 33].
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State Maryland
County (Primary) Talbot
Other Counties Kent, Caroline
Family Name Phillips
Family History Notes 1. Elizabeth Phillips, born say 1700, was the servant of Eliza Stevens of Saint Peter's Parish in March 1720 when the Talbot County court ordered that she serve her mistress an additional year for stealing petticoats and a bonnet from her mistress. In March 1724/5 she confessed to the court that she had an illegitimate child by "Negroe Will, the slave of Elizabeth Phillips." The court ordered that she be sold as a servant for seven years. She confessed to having another child by William in March 1725/6. She was the servant of William Stevens in November 1731 when she was convicted of fornication and given thirty lashes [Judgment Record 1720, 14; 1725-6, 64-5; 485-6; 1731-3, 463]. Elizabeth may have been the ancestor of 2 i. Jane, born say 1748. 3 ii. Richard, born say 1760. iii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. iv. Henry, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:165] and 6 in 1810 (H. Phillips) [MD:871]. v. Robert, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:845]. 2. Jane Phillips, born say 1748, was the servant of Moses Alford in August 1767 when she was convicted by the Kent County court of having a "Molatto" child. The court sold her son Anthony Phillips until the age of thirty one to her master for 5 shillings [Criminal Docket 1766-71, n.p.]. She was the mother of i. Antony, head of a Harford County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:800]. 3. Richard Phillips, born say 1760, was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 13 in 1800 [MD:471], and 8 in 1810 [MD:178]. He was probably the father of i. Daniel, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 31 October 1809: yellow complexion, free born and raised in the said county [Certificates of Freedom, 33].
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Family Name Priss/Press
Family History Notes 1. Priscilla, born say 1688, was called "Priss alias Priscilla a Malatta or Mustee bigg with a bastard Child got in Somerset County in Maryland" in Accomack County court on 7 August 1706 when Edward Bagwell, "Indian," appeared in court and agreed to have her child bound to him [Orders 1703-9, 75]. Her child was 2 i. William, born in 1706. 2. William Priss/ Press, born in 1706, was called "an Indian who was born in Accomack (County) of the body of a free Negro called Priscilla" in March 1730/1 when he was fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco for failing to list himself as a tithable in Northampton County, Virginia. Thomas Fisherman, who was also an Indian, was paid 1,000 pounds of tobacco for informing on him [Mihalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 239]. William was apparently the ancestor of the following members of the Press family: i. Littleton, married Molly Fisherman 14 December 179? Northampton County bond, Reubin Reed security. ii. Elsey, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:160]. iii. Tabby, married Thomas Francis, 26 December 1796 Northampton County bond, Edmund Press security. iv. Molly, married Sam Beavans, 19 August 1797 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security. v. Edmund, security for the 24 September 1796 Northampton County marriage of Solomon Beavans and Esther Casey. vi. ?John, head of a Sussex County, Delaware family of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:375].
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State Virginia
County (Primary) Accomack
Other Counties Northampton, Somerset
Family Name Priss/Press
Family History Notes 1. Priscilla, born say 1688, was called "Priss alias Priscilla a Malatta or Mustee bigg with a bastard Child got in Somerset County in Maryland" in Accomack County court on 7 August 1706 when Edward Bagwell, "Indian," appeared in court and agreed to have her child bound to him [Orders 1703-9, 75]. Her child was 2 i. William, born in 1706. 2. William Priss/ Press, born in 1706, was called "an Indian who was born in Accomack (County) of the body of a free Negro called Priscilla" in March 1730/1 when he was fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco for failing to list himself as a tithable in Northampton County, Virginia. Thomas Fisherman, who was also an Indian, was paid 1,000 pounds of tobacco for informing on him [Mihalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 239]. William was apparently the ancestor of the following members of the Press family: i. Littleton, married Molly Fisherman 14 December 179? Northampton County bond, Reubin Reed security. ii. Elsey, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:160]. iii. Tabby, married Thomas Francis, 26 December 1796 Northampton County bond, Edmund Press security. iv. Molly, married Sam Beavans, 19 August 1797 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security. v. Edmund, security for the 24 September 1796 Northampton County marriage of Solomon Beavans and Esther Casey. vi. ?John, head of a Sussex County, Delaware family of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:375].
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